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Intraoperative bacterial contamination of the aqueous humor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220987
Source
Ophthalmic Surg. 1993 Jun;24(6):367-73; discussion 373-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
R G Ariyasu
T. Nakamura
M D Trousdale
R E Smith
Author Affiliation
Doheny Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles 90033.
Source
Ophthalmic Surg. 1993 Jun;24(6):367-73; discussion 373-4
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Eye Segment - surgery
Aqueous Humor - drug effects - microbiology
Conjunctiva - microbiology
Eye Diseases - surgery
Eyelids - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - isolation & purification
Humans
Intraoperative Period
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Abstract
Indigenous ocular flora has been presumed to be a source of infectious organisms in postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis. While bacteria have been recovered from the anterior chamber at the time of cataract wound closure in a significant percentage of cases, and bacteria from the vitreous of endophthalmitis cases have appeared genetically to be very similar to bacteria recovered from the adnexa and/or nares at the time of vitrectomy for endophthalmitis, no study has examined the relationship between organisms isolated from the eyelid and conjunctiva, and organisms recovered from the aqueous humor at the time of wound closure. This study examined 59 eyes undergoing cataract and other intraocular surgeries. Cultures of the eyelids and conjunctiva were taken before and after routine preparation with povidone-iodine solution. Cultures also were taken of the aqueous humor at the time of incision into the anterior chamber and at the time of wound closure. No organisms grew from aqueous humor samples taken at the time of incision. However, 13 eyes (22%) grew gram-positive organisms from samples taken at the time of wound closure. Eight of the 13 eyes (62%) had organisms with identical typing and antibiotic sensitivities to organisms isolated from the eyelids and conjunctiva before or after disinfection. This study suggests that a significant number of cases had inoperative bacterial contamination of the aqueous humor by the time of wound closure and that organisms from the eyelids and conjunctiva are an important source of contamination in these cases.
PubMed ID
8336886 View in PubMed
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Low molecular weight immunosuppressive factors found in elevated amounts in cancer ascitic fluids of mice. 1. Isolation, identification and immunosuppressive effects of uric acid and uracil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26470
Source
J Immunopharmacol. 1986;8(1):39-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
S. Sami
S. Takano
T. Majima
H. Aso
T. Nakamura
N. Ishida
Source
J Immunopharmacol. 1986;8(1):39-58
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ascitic Fluid - immunology - metabolism
Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor - analysis - metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic - drug effects
Immunosuppressive Agents - metabolism
Killer Cells, Natural - drug effects
Liver - enzymology
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains
Neoplasm Transplantation
Ribonucleosides - analysis
Uracil - immunology - isolation & purification
Urate Oxidase - metabolism
Uric Acid - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
A definite increase in two low molecular weight factors, G10-2 and G10-3 was found in Ehrlich ascitic fluids, parallel to tumor growth. The isolation and identification of the two factors were attempted through gel filtration and reversed phase column chromatography, using ascitic fluids obtained 13 days after intraperitoneal implantation of Ehrlich tumor cells. As a result, two highly purified factors were observed upon examination by high performance liquid chromatography. Additional analytical data, collected by UV spectrum, NMR spectrum and mass analysis, allowed us to identify G10-2 as uric acid and G10-3 as uracil. Detailed immunological analysis of uric acid and uracil revealed that the augmenting activities of mouse and human NK cells by mouse IFN alpha/beta or human rIFN alpha A/D were impaired in the presence of either compound at concentrations of 0.07 mM, the concentration detectable in the ascitic fluid of tumor bearing mice.
PubMed ID
3711673 View in PubMed
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Low ocean-floor rises regulate subpolar sea surface temperature by forming baroclinic jets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290625
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 Mar 22; 9(1):1190
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-22-2018
Author
H Mitsudera
T Miyama
H Nishigaki
T Nakanowatari
H Nishikawa
T Nakamura
T Wagawa
R Furue
Y Fujii
S Ito
Author Affiliation
Pan Okhotsk Research Center, Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0819, Japan. humiom@lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 Mar 22; 9(1):1190
Date
Mar-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Sea surface temperature (SST) fronts in mid- to high-latitude oceans have significant impacts on extratropical atmospheric circulations and climate. In the western subarctic Pacific, sharp SST fronts form between the cold subarctic water and the recently found quasi-stationary jets that advect warm waters originating in the Kuroshio northeastward. Here we present a new mechanism of the jet formation paying attention to the propagation of baroclinic Rossby waves that is deflected by eddy-driven barotropic flows over bottom rises, although their height is low (~500?m) compared with the depth of the North Pacific Ocean (~6000?m). Steered by the barotropic flows, Rossby waves bring a thicker upper layer from the subtropical gyre and a thinner upper layer from the subarctic gyre, thereby creating a thickness jump, hence a surface jet, where they converge. This study reveals an overlooked role of low-rise bottom topography in regulating SST anomalies in subpolar oceans.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2008 Mar 13;452(7184):206-9 PMID 18337820
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 Dec 04;5:17785 PMID 26635077
PubMed ID
29568009 View in PubMed
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Purification and properties of a bacteriocin of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from dental plaque.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203503
Source
Oral Microbiol Immunol. 1998 Dec;13(6):387-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
T. Nakamura
K. Hirai
Y. Shibata
S. Fujimura
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Microbiology, Matsumoto Dental University School of Dentistry, NAGANO-Ken, Japan.
Source
Oral Microbiol Immunol. 1998 Dec;13(6):387-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Bacteriocins - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Dental Plaque - microbiology
Ecosystem
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Staphylococcus - drug effects
Staphylococcus epidermidis - chemistry - isolation & purification - physiology
Streptococcus - drug effects
Abstract
An extracellular bacteriocin of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from dental plaque was purified and characterized. Its molecular mass was 3500 Da and pI was 10.5. This bacteriocin inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus mitis, but Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis and other oral indigenous bacterial species examined were not inhibited. The mode of inhibition was found to be bacteriostatic.
PubMed ID
9872117 View in PubMed
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Relationship between mutations in dihydropteroate synthase of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis isolates in Japan and resistance to sulfonamide therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7509
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Sep;38(9):3161-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
T. Takahashi
N. Hosoya
T. Endo
T. Nakamura
H. Sakashita
K. Kimura
K. Ohnishi
Y. Nakamura
A. Iwamoto
Author Affiliation
Departments of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Japan. takahata@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Sep;38(9):3161-4
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Adult
Aged
Antifungal Agents - pharmacology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - microbiology
Dihydropteroate Synthase - genetics - metabolism
Drug Resistance, Microbial - genetics
Female
Genes, Fungal
Humans
Japan
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Pneumocystis - drug effects - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Pneumonia, Pneumocystis - drug therapy - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
Treatment Failure
Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Combination - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
We examined mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) genes of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis (P. carinii) strains isolated from 24 patients with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) in Japan. DHPS mutations were identified at amino acid positions 55 and/or 57 in isolates from 6 (25.0%) of 24 patients. The underlying diseases for these six patients were human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (n = 4) or malignant lymphoma (n = 2). This frequency was almost the same as those reported in Denmark and the United States. None of the six patients whose isolates had DHPS mutations were recently exposed to sulfa drugs before they developed the current episode of PCP, suggesting that DHPS mutations not only are selected by the pressure of sulfa agents but may be incidentally acquired. Co-trimoxazole treatment failed more frequently in patients whose isolates had DHPS mutations than in those whose isolates had wild-type DHPS (n = 4 [100%] versus n = 2 [11.1%]; P = 0.002). Our results thus suggest that DHPS mutations may contribute to failures of co-trimoxazole treatment for PCP.
PubMed ID
10970350 View in PubMed
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Screening for variants of the uncoupling protein 2 gene in Japanese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47985
Source
Metabolism. 1999 May;48(5):581-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
T. Shiinoki
T. Suehiro
Y. Ikeda
M. Inoue
T. Nakamura
Y. Kumon
Y. Nakauchi
K. Hashimoto
Author Affiliation
Second Department of Internal Medicine, Kochi Medical School, Japan.
Source
Metabolism. 1999 May;48(5):581-4
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amino Acid Substitution - genetics
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - genetics
Female
Genetic Screening
Humans
Japan
Male
Membrane Transport Proteins
Middle Aged
Mitochondrial Proteins
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Proteins - genetics
Abstract
We examined genetic mutations in the coding regions of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) gene in 100 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The sequences of each exon-intron boundary were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primer pairs designed in the cDNA sequence of UCP2 and a cycle-sequence method. Using the specific primer pairs in the intron 5'- or 3'-untranslated region, each exon with its exon-intron boundaries was amplified with the PCR method, and the PCR products were analyzed using a single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method. One nucleotide substitution in exon 4 was found, which exchanged Ala (gcc) at position 55 of the amino acid sequence for Val (gtc), previously reported in Denmark by Urhammer et al in 1997. The polymorphism was reanalyzed in all patients and 120 normal subjects using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. There was no difference in the genotype distribution between patients and normal subjects, and our genotype distribution was similar to the Danish study. Furthermore, there were no clinical differences between genotype groups among the patients. No other mutation including the exon-intron boundary was found in these patients. Genetic mutations of UCP2 may not be commonly associated with obesity or diabetes in Japanese subjects.
PubMed ID
10337857 View in PubMed
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Thermodynamics of equilibria of hemoglobins M Milwaukee-I and Saskatoon and isolated chains of hemoglobin A with carbon monoxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251056
Source
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1976 May 17;70(2):567-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-1976

Variant ataxia-telangiectasia presenting as primary-appearing dystonia in Canadian Mennonites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126874
Source
Neurology. 2012 Feb 28;78(9):649-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2012
Author
R. Saunders-Pullman
D. Raymond
A J Stoessl
D. Hobson
K. Nakamura
T. Nakamura
S. Pullman
D. Lefton
M S Okun
R. Uitti
R. Sachdev
K. Stanley
M. San Luciano
J. Hagenah
R. Gatti
L J Ozelius
S B Bressman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. rsaunder@bethisraelny.org
Source
Neurology. 2012 Feb 28;78(9):649-57
Date
Feb-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Ataxia Telangiectasia - complications - genetics
Canada
Child
Dystonia - etiology - genetics
Dystonic Disorders - etiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Testing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Pedigree
Phenotype
Abstract
To compare the phenotype of primary-appearing dystonia due to variant ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) with that of other dystonia ascertained for genetics research.
Movement disorder specialists examined 20 Canadian Mennonite adult probands with primary-appearing dystonia, as well as relatives in 4 families with parent-child transmission of dystonia. We screened for the exon 43 c.6200 C>A (p. A2067D) ATM mutation and mutations in DYT1 and DYT6. Clinical features of the individuals with dystonia who were harboring ATM mutations were compared with those of individuals without mutations.
Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous founder mutation in ATM in 13 members from 3 of the families, and no one harbored DYT6 or DYT1 mutations. Dystonia in ATM families mimicked other forms of early-onset primary torsion dystonia, especially DYT6, with prominent cervical, cranial, and brachial involvement. Mean age at onset was markedly younger in the patients with variant A-T (n = 12) than in patients with other dystonia (n = 23), (12 years vs 40 years, p
Notes
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Erratum In: Neurology. 2012 Mar 27;78(13):1029Nakamura, T [corrected to Nakamura, K]
PubMed ID
22345219 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.