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29 records – page 1 of 3.

Adapting the Jalowiec Coping Scale in Norwegian adult psoriasis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200970
Source
Qual Life Res. 1999 Aug;8(5):435-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A. Wahl
T. Moum
B R Hanestad
I. Wiklund
M H Kalfoss
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. astrid.klopstad.wahl@hib.no
Source
Qual Life Res. 1999 Aug;8(5):435-45
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psoriasis - psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to adapt the Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS) to accommodate adult patients with psoriasis. The sample comprised 334 patients who were treated consecutively at three dermatology departments in the eastern Norway. A total number of 273 hospitalised patients (20%) and out-patients (80%) completed the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 82%. The study assessed the reliability and the face, content and construct validity of the Norwegian version of the JCS. In addition, researchers investigated the most frequently used/effective coping strategies, the relationships between demographic/clinical variables, self-reported physical symptoms and the use of coping strategies. The results (correlational coefficients and interitem alpha s) indicated that there was an overlap in substantive content among the original JCS subscales, due either to measurement error (bias or response style) and/or because the patients in the present study were in a demanding situation in relation to their disease, which may have activated a variety of coping strategies. A factor analysis resulted in a three-factor solution (confrontive problem-solving, normalising/optimistic and combined emotive) with satisfactory internal consistency. This factor solution comprised 31 items with an explained variance of 37% of the total pool of items. The most frequently used and effective coping strategies could be labelled as emotion-focused (optimistic/maintain control). Significant correlations were found between age, hospital setting, self-reported physical symptoms and different coping subscales. However, further studies are needed to assess the validity and reliability of the JCS among different population groups in Norway.
PubMed ID
10474285 View in PubMed
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The association between maternal education and postneonatal mortality. Trends in Norway, 1968-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34777
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):578-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
A. Arntzen
T. Moum
P. Magnus
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):578-84
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND. This study examines whether the association between maternal educational level and postneonatal death has changed over time. METHODS. All single survivors of the neonatal period in Norway in three periods, 1968-1971, 1978-1981 and 1989-1991 were studied. There were 582 046 births and 1717 postneonatal deaths. Logistic regression analyses were applied. RESULTS. There has been an increasing inverse relationship between maternal educational level and postneonatal mortality in recent years. There was no statistically significant association between educational level and postneonatal mortality in the late 1960s. In the second period (1978-1981) the association is statistically significant for first-born children. In the third period (1989-1991) postneonatal mortality for first-born and later-born children was associated with maternal educational level, with adjusted odds ratios of 2.5 and 2.1 respectively. The overall level of education has increased tremendously, and the proportion of women with the lowest level of education has decreased from 56.3 to 10.7% in the period under study. CONCLUSIONS. The underlying causes of changes in the impact of educational level are hard to determine and are indicative of the complexity of using maternal educational level as an indicator of social status over time. Possible mechanisms by which certain variables may covary with educational level, and thus have an adverse effect on postneonatal mortality, are discussed. The fact that the inverse association between educational level and postneonatal mortality has increased over time should be a matter for concern. It may indicate that the growth of the welfare state has not reached all segments of the population.
PubMed ID
8671559 View in PubMed
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Compliance to drug treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a 3 year longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14141
Source
J Rheumatol. 1999 Oct;26(10):2114-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
F. Viller
F. Guillemin
S. Briançon
T. Moum
T. Suurmeijer
W. van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Nancy, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, France.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1999 Oct;26(10):2114-22
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Patient compliance is considered necessary for the success of drug treatment in chronic diseases. We document compliance with drug treatment and the factors affecting it in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 556 patients with RA followed for 3 years in 4 counties: Oslo, Norway; Groningen, The Netherlands; and Nancy and Reims, France. Compliance to treatment was assessed annually by interview in terms of adherence to the dose and timing of the prescribed drug regimen. RESULTS: Of the 556 subjects, 429 (77.2%) were taking medication for RA throughout the observation period. Consistent behavior was recorded in 59.5% of cases: 35.7% were consistently compliant, and 23.8% consistently noncompliant. Factors significantly associated with good compliance were older age (p = 0.00), female sex (p = 0.03), decreased disability (p = 0.04), very satisfactory contacts with health care professionals (p = 0.03), and more personal knowledge about the disease and its treatment (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: This longitudinal study identified compliance behavior as consistent over time in 60% of patients, determined by quality of contact with professionals and the amount of patient information available.
PubMed ID
10529126 View in PubMed
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Concordance between symptom screening and diagnostic procedure: the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46324
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Jul;33(7):345-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
I. Sandanger
T. Moum
G. Ingebrigtsen
O S Dalgard
T. Sørensen
D. Bruusgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Insurance Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Jul;33(7):345-54
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Data Collection - methods
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics - methods
ROC Curve
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The definition of case is a core issue in psychiatric epidemiology. Psychiatric symptom screening scales have been extensively used in population studies for many decades. Structured diagnostic interviews have become available during recent years to give exact diagnoses through carefully undertaken procedures. The aim of this article was to assess how well the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) predicted cases by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and find the optimal cut-offs on the HSCL-25 for each diagnosis and gender. Characteristics of concordant and discordant cases were explored. In a Norwegian two-stage survey mental health problems were measured by the HSCL-25 and the CIDI. Only 46% of the present CIDI diagnoses were predicted by the HSCL-25. Comorbidity between CIDI diagnoses was found more than four times as often in the concordant cases (case agreed upon by both instruments) than in the discordant CIDI cases. Concordant cases had more depression and panic/generalized anxiety disorders. Neither the anxiety nor the depression subscales improved the prediction of anxiety or depression. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves confirmed that the HSCL-25 gave best information about depression. Except for phobia it predicted best for men. Optimal HSCL-25 cut-off was 1.67 for men and 1.75 for women. Of the discordant HSCL-25 cases, one-third reported no symptoms in the CIDI, one-third reported symptoms in the CIDI anxiety module, and the rest had symptoms spread across the modules. With the exception of depression, the HSCL-25 was insufficient to select individuals for further investigation of diagnosis. The two instruments to a large extent identified different cases. Either the HSCL-25 is a very imperfect indicator of the chosen CIDI diagnoses, or the dimensions of mental illness measured by each of the instruments are different and clearly only partly overlapping.
PubMed ID
9689897 View in PubMed
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Coping and quality of life in patients with psoriasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72307
Source
Qual Life Res. 1999 Aug;8(5):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A. Wahl
B R Hanestad
I. Wiklund
T. Moum
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Qual Life Res. 1999 Aug;8(5):427-33
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health status
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psoriasis - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between coping dimensions and overall quality of life, disability and health status in patients' with psoriasis. Psoriasis is one of several chronic diseases which requires self-management in order to ensure an enhanced quality of life. The sample comprised 334 patients who were treated consecutively at three dermatology departments in eastern Norway. A total number of 273 patients completed the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 82% (20% in-patients and 80% out-patients). The following questionnaires were used: The Jalowiec Coping Scale, the Psoriasis Disability Index, the Quality of Life Scale, and the SF-36. Results showed that patients who used combined emotive coping strategies reported more disability, poorer mental health and worse overall quality of life. Furthermore, patients who more frequently used normalising/optimistic coping reported higher levels of mental health. However, the variance explained by coping effort was low to moderate. Coping explained the variance in mental health and overall quality of life to a greater extent than that in physical health. Knowledge about the relationships between coping and quality of life dimensions is important with regard to the establishment and implementation of appropriate psychosocial interventions for patients with psoriasis.
PubMed ID
10474284 View in PubMed
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Correlates of functional disability in early rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study of 706 patients in four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14293
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1996 Aug;35(8):746-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996

Diabetes mellitus and psychological well-being. Results of the Nord-Tr√łndelag health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48358
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1995 Sep;23(3):179-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
S. Naess
K. Midthjell
T. Moum
T. Sørensen
K. Tambs
Author Affiliation
Institute of Applied Social Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1995 Sep;23(3):179-88
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Abstract
The present study relies on questionnaire data from a diabetes and hypertension screening carried out on the entire adult population of a medium-sized Norwegian county (total number of participants = 74,977). Self-reported diabetic patients were compared with non-diabetics, and with patients with self-reported angina pectoris, previous cardiac infarction, and stroke. The psychological well-being of the known diabetic patients was found to be significantly poorer than that of those without diabetes, but better than that of those with angina and stroke. HbAl level was found to be significantly related to well-being, the low levels of HbAl (below 7.5%) scoring low on well-being and the high levels (above 15%) scoring high. Because of its special design, the present study allowed comparisons between diabetic patients undergoing treatment and newly detected patients who had not yet been treated. Treatment-related interpretations therefore could be rejected.
PubMed ID
8602488 View in PubMed
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[Does diagnosed hypertension change quality of life? Results from a medical population study in Nord-Tr√łndelag].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224515
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jan 10;112(1):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1992
Author
T. Moum
T. Sørensen
S. Naess
J. Holmen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for medisinske atferdsfag, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jan 10;112(1):18-23
Date
Jan-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Abstract
The authors report results from medical screening for hypertension carried out on the entire adult population (aged greater than 20 years) of the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway. Previously undiagnosed hypertensives in need of medical treatment (n = 173), false positives (n = 233) and patients in need of continued blood pressure monitoring (n = 474) were followed up 10 to 36 months after the screening. This group was compared with a random population sample of known hypertensives (n = 206), patients previously treated for hypertension (n = 118) and normotensives (n = 2,326). No significant differences in changes in quality of life (subjective well-being) were observed between the two groups from screening to follow-up. However, negative events in life and chronic stresses other than the fact of becoming sick induced a deterioration of quality of life. Positive events induced an improvement in quality of life.
PubMed ID
1553637 View in PubMed
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Drug consumption in the first years of rheumatoid arthritis in France, The Netherlands, and Norway. A longitudinal study in the early nineties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14067
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2000;29(6):352-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A. Ludig
F. Guillemin
I. Chary-Valckenaere
T P Suurmeijer
T. Moum
W J van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Rheumatology Unit, CHU Brabois, Nancy, France.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2000;29(6):352-7
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - surgery
Cohort Studies
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
France
Humans
Injections, Intra-Articular
Longitudinal Studies
Netherlands
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse drug consumption in the first years of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in France, the Netherlands, and Norway, in a longitudinal study between 1991 and 1993. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The EURIDISS cohort followed up over three years included 695 RA subjects with less than 5 years disease duration. Clinical and biological parameters, drug consumption according to ATC classification, and use of local treatment were recorded. RESULTS: In the Netherlands consumption of second-line treatment occurred early on, and remained constant over time. In France, it was consumed by half of the subjects and decreased during follow-up (p
PubMed ID
11132203 View in PubMed
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Genetic and environmental contributions to the variance of body height in a sample of first and second degree relatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64945
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1992 Jul;88(3):285-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
K. Tambs
T. Moum
L J Eaves
M C Neale
K. Midthjell
P G Lund-Larsen
S. Naess
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1992 Jul;88(3):285-94
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Family
Female
Genes, Dominant
Humans
Male
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Characteristics
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Height was measured in a health screening of the population in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway. Correlations were computed for 24,281 pairs of spouses, 43,613 pairs of parents and offspring, 19,168 pairs of siblings, 1,318 pairs of grandparents and grandchildren, 1,218 cognate avuncular pairs, 849 noncognate avuncular pairs, 175 pairs of same-sexed twins, and smaller groups of other types of relatives. Fitting of structural equation models showed proportions of additive genetic variance of approximately 0.8 for both sexes and small sex-specific effects that probably reflect genetic dominance or environmental sibling effects. The correlations between parents and offspring were significantly lower in old than young cohorts, seeming to imply some kind of interaction effect between genes and environment.
PubMed ID
1642316 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.