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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Adverse drug reaction reporting by nurses in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164305
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Jun;63(6):613-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
M. Bäckström
Elisabet Ekman
T. Mjörndal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Umeå, S-901 85, Umeå, Sweden. martin.backstrom@pharm.umu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Jun;63(6):613-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurses
Physicians
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate whether nurses could be a useful tool for improving the reporting rate of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Furthermore, we wanted to study how physicians working at the study departments would respond to nurses as reporters of ADRs and if the reporting from the nurses affected the reporting rate from the physicians.
Three departments of internal medicine and one unit for orthopaedics were selected for the study. Nurses with special drug responsibilities were invited to participate. At the start of the study period, the nurses received an introduction with background, objective, method and other practical issues concerning the study. After this, an education programme about ADR reporting, definitions, and ADR classification according to mechanism and organ system was given. To study their knowledge about and attitude towards ADRs, a questionnaire was handed out to the nurses. A questionnaire was also handed out to all physicians at the participating departments in order to investigate their attitude towards nurses as reporters of ADRs.
Fifty-four nurses participated in the study. During the study period, a total number of 23 reports with 39 ADRs were sent to the regional centres by the nurses. Seventeen (74%) of the reports were assessed as serious. Eight of the 39 ADRs were unlabelled and all reports were considered appropriate. The reporting rate from the physicians during the study period was similar to the previous year, indicating that the nurses contributed with additional reports. At the end of the study, the nurses thought that they had enough knowledge to report ADRs. Sixty-eight percent of the physicians did not object to nurses being included as reporters of suspected ADRs.
Adverse drug reaction reporting by nurses could improve the overall safety of drugs.
PubMed ID
17404719 View in PubMed
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[A regional center for reporting adverse drug reactions in Umeå. Prompt handling results in quick feedback].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215986
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jan 18;92(3):148-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1995
Author
M. Bäckström
R. Dahlqvist
T. Mjörndal
O. Spigset
K. Hedenmalm
K. Granberg
U. Oqvist
B E Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jan 18;92(3):148-50
Date
Jan-18-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Drug Information Services
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
7837847 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72003
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2000 Dec;56(9-10):729-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Bäckström
T. Mjörndal
R. Dahlqvist
T. Nordkvist-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2000 Dec;56(9-10):729-32
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to investigate attitudes of general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians in Sweden towards spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). METHOD: Two areas in the northern region of Sweden were selected for the study. A knowledge and attitude questionnaire followed by a reminder letter 2 weeks later was addressed to all GPs and hospital physicians in the study areas. RESULT: The total response rate from the study areas was 748 of the 1274 questionnaires sent out (58.7%). Of those who responded, 236 were GPs, 433 were hospital physicians and 79 had other positions. Of the responders, 252 stated that they had never reported any ADR and 488 that they had reported at least once in their career. Issues that came out as important in the decision to report or not to report were whether the reaction was considered well-known or not, the severity of the reaction, hesitance to report only on suspicion, lack of knowledge of existing rules, giving priority to other matters and lack of time to report ADRs. Only minor differences in these regards were observed between male and female physicians. CONCLUSION: Our investigation shows that the physicians in northern Sweden have a fairly good knowledge about the existing rules for reporting ADRs in Sweden. However, the attitudes leave room for considerable under-reporting due to matters related mainly to the medical impact of the reaction and of reporting it, but also to the scientific "paradox" of reporting only on suspicion and of course due to lack of time in the health care setting.
PubMed ID
11214784 View in PubMed
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Drug prescription patterns for rheumatic disorders in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240285
Source
J Rheumatol. 1984 Aug;11(4):493-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984
Author
A. Bjelle
T. Mjörndal
Source
J Rheumatol. 1984 Aug;11(4):493-9
Date
Aug-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Chloroquine - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - therapeutic use
Hospitals, University
Humans
Ibuprofen - therapeutic use
Indomethacin - therapeutic use
Naproxen - therapeutic use
Penicillamine - therapeutic use
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Phenylbutazone - therapeutic use
Rheumatic Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Rheumatology - trends
Suppositories
Sweden
Abstract
Drug prescription patterns, expressed in defined daily doses (DDD), were registered during the 1970s for disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID). An increased prescription of DMARD was found at a national level (Sweden), starting with chloroquine, followed by penicillamine and finally by gold. This same tendency was seen at a county (Västerbotten) and a university hospital level (Umeå). Among NSAID for oral use, the prescription of indomethacin and phenylbutazone gradually decreased in Sweden. Naproxen and ibuprofen increased rapidly, surpassing the others from 1975. This increase was far less marked at the county level and at the rheumatology department of Umeå in which the overall prescription of NSAID for inpatients decreased during the 70s.
PubMed ID
6434737 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a computer-based decision support system for treatment of hypertension with drugs: retrospective, nonintervention testing of cost and guideline adherence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15610
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Jan;247(1):87-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
M. Persson
T. Mjörndal
B. Carlberg
J. Bohlin
L H Lindholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Umeâ, Department of Pharmacology, Sweden. mats.persson@fammed.umu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Jan;247(1):87-93
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Drug Costs
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - economics - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a computerized decision support system (DSS) for drug treatment of hypertension, regarding quality, safety, and cost compared to actual antihypertensive drug treatment. DESIGN: The medical profiles of 338 hypertensive patients treated with drugs against hypertension were processed by the DSS. The drug treatment proposed by the system was then compared to actual treatment given by their physician. SETTING: Four health centres in the county of Västerbotten, in Sweden. SUBJECTS: A list of hypertensive patients was extracted from the computerized medical records of each health centre and every fifth patient's medical profile was assessed by the system. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Drug used, drug used in relation to certain major diseases such as diabetes mellitus, asthma, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and previous myocardial infarction. Adherence to hypertension guidelines, safety, and cost. RESULTS: The DSS suggested significantly more thiazides and significantly fewer calcium antagonists than the physicians had prescribed, with a total cost reduction of 33-40%, depending on doses chosen. The DSS drug profile was more adherent to guidelines in patients with major complicating diseases, suggesting an improvement in treatment quality for these patients by the DSS. CONCLUSION: The DSS which fully implements current guidelines may improve the quality of antihypertensive treatment, concurrently leading to a considerable reduction in drug costs.
PubMed ID
10672135 View in PubMed
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Interaction between the Drug Information Centre and the Regional Centre for Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208843
Source
Pharm World Sci. 1997 Apr;19(2):114-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997

Leptin concentrations are increased in subjects treated with clozapine or conventional antipsychotics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47623
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;62(11):843-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
S. Hägg
S. Söderberg
B. Ahrén
T. Olsson
T. Mjörndal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. staffan.hagg@pharm.umu.se
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;62(11):843-8
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Body mass index
Clozapine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delayed-Action Preparations - pharmacokinetics - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - blood
Leptin - blood - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - chemically induced
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy
Radioimmunoassay
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Overweight is a considerable clinical problem in patients treated with antipsychotic agents. Recent results suggest that insulin resistance with increased insulin levels is also associated with treatment with the atypical antipsychotic agent clozapine. Leptin is important for the control of body weight and has been proposed to be a link between obesity and the insulin resistance syndrome. This study examined if clozapine-treated subjects and subjects treated with conventional antipsychotics had increased leptin levels compared with the general population and whether there was a gender difference in this respect. METHOD: Clozapine-treated patients (N = 41), patients treated with conventional antipsychotic drugs (N = 62), and healthy subjects from the Northern Sweden Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) project (N = 189) were investigated with a cross-sectional study design. Weight, body mass index (BMI), and plasma leptin concentrations were measured, and all study subjects were investigated for the presence of diabetes mellitus. Drug treatment, health status, and smoking habits were registered. RESULTS: After adjustment for gender, BMI, smoking habits, age, and diabetes, hyperleptinemia was independently (p
PubMed ID
11775042 View in PubMed
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Management of vitamin B12 deficiency in outpatient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221516
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Mar;11(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
T. Mjörndal
B. Norberg
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Mar;11(1):1-2
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Humans
Sweden
Vitamin B 12 - metabolism - therapeutic use
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency - therapy
PubMed ID
8484073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in patients treated with clozapine compared with patients treated with conventional depot neuroleptic medications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48081
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 1998 Jun;59(6):294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
S. Hägg
L. Joelsson
T. Mjörndal
O. Spigset
G. Oja
R. Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 1998 Jun;59(6):294-9
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Clozapine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Delayed-Action Preparations
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - chemically induced - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent case reports suggest the association of the emergence of diabetes mellitus with clozapine treatment, although conventional neuroleptics have also been implicated. This study was conducted to determine if there is an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) during clozapine treatment compared with treatment with conventional depot neuroleptics. METHOD: In a district hospital in northern Sweden, blood glucose tests and, if necessary an oral glucose tolerance test were used to assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus or IGT in 63 patients treated with clozapine compared with 67 patients treated with conventional depot neuroleptics (haloperidol, zuclopenthixol, fluphenazine, perphenazine, or flupenthixol). Diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance were classified according to World Health Organization criteria. RESULTS: There were 3 dropouts in the clozapine group and 4 in the control group. Of subjects treated with clozapine, 12% (7/60) had type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 10% (6/60) had IGT. Of subjects treated with depot injections of neuroleptics, 6% (4/63) had type 2 diabetes mellitus and 3% (2/63) had IGT. None in either group had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subjects in the clozapine group were significantly (p
PubMed ID
9671341 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.