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The associations of endogenous testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin with glycosylated hemoglobin levels, in community dwelling men. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47274
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2004 Feb;30(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
J. Svartberg
T. Jenssen
J. Sundsfjord
R. Jorde
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, N-9038 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2004 Feb;30(1):29-34
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body constitution
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood
Health Surveys
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Smoking
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Low levels of endogenous testosterone have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis in men. Long-term hyperglycemia, as measured by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), is related to cardiovascular mortality, and HbA1c across its normal range is also positively related to coronary heart and cardiovascular disease mortality in men. We therefore undertook an analysis of the cross-sectional associations of total testosterone and SHBG levels with HbA1c levels, in a general population of 1419 men aged 25-84.METHODS: Total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and HbA1c were measured by immuno-assay. Partial correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to estimate the associations between total testosterone and SHBG with HbA1c. Analyses of variance and covariance were used to compare men with or without diabetes.RESULTS: In age-adjusted partial correlation HbA1c was inversely associated with total testosterone (p
PubMed ID
15029095 View in PubMed
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Baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in the Tromsø Study 1994-95 and risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus during 11 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140666
Source
Diabet Med. 2010 Oct;27(10):1107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
G. Grimnes
N. Emaus
R M Joakimsen
Y. Figenschau
T. Jenssen
I. Njølstad
H. Schirmer
R. Jorde
Author Affiliation
Medical Clinic, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. guri.grimnes@unn.no
Source
Diabet Med. 2010 Oct;27(10):1107-15
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - blood - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
We wanted to test the hypothesis that low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations are associated with increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in a population-based cohort during 11 years of follow-up.
The analyses included 4157 non-smokers and 1962 smokers from the Tromsø Study 1994-95 without diabetes at baseline. Subsequent Type 2 DM was defined using a hospital journal-based end-point registry, completed through the year 2005. Participants were allocated into quartiles of serum 25(OH)D within each month to account for seasonal variation, and serum 25(OH)D values both as a continuous variable and in quartiles were used in Cox regression models. The analyses were stratified by smoking. Adjustments were made for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), physical activity and, in non-smokers, former smoking.
Type 2 DM was registered in 183 non-smoking and 64 smoking participants. Using the fourth (highest) quartile of serum 25(OH)D as the reference, non-smoking participants in the third, second and first quartiles had age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of incident Type 2 DM of 1.00 (0.62-1.61), 1.50 (0.97-2.31) and 1.89 (1.25-2.88), respectively, whereas the corresponding values for smokers were 1.79 (0.77-4.19), 2.33 (1.02-5.35) and 2.68 (1.18-6.08). Adjustment for BMI attenuated the hazard ratios, and they were no longer significant.
Baseline serum 25(OH)D was inversely associated with subsequent Type 2 DM in a population-based 11 year follow-up study, but not after adjustment for BMI. Randomized trials are needed to define the possible role of serum 25(OH)D status, and thereby the role of supplementation, in the prevention of Type 2 DM.
PubMed ID
20854377 View in PubMed
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[Invasive pneumococcal infections in children from Troms, Nordland and Sor-Trondelag 1980-95]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32774
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 30;120(3):308-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2000
Author
K T Jenssen
L D Selnes
P E Haereid
B B Ellingsen
T. Flaegstad
Author Affiliation
Det medisinske fakultet Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 30;120(3):308-11
Date
Jan-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Meningitis, Pneumococcal - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Risk factors
Abstract
Invasive pneumococcal infections may be severe. We have examined epidemiology, risk factors and outcome of these infections. In the years 1980-95, 76 children below the age of 15 with invasive pneumococcal infections were admitted to the hospitals in the counties of Troms, Nordland and Sør-Trøndelag in Norway. The incidence rate in children 0-2 years old was 10.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year, and 1.8 in children 3-14 years. Of the patients 24 had meningitis and 52 bacteraemia. All bacteriological isolates were sensitive to benzylpenicillin. Seven patients died and five developed sequelae. Thirty-one of the children had risk factors prior to the infection. Children with hypo- or hyperventilation at the time of arrival, and/or impaired circulation fared worse than those with normal findings. Children with underlying risk factors have a much higher frequency of invasive pneumococcal infections than other children. Patients who had impaired circulation or ventilation on admission have a bad prognosis for healthy survival.
PubMed ID
10827518 View in PubMed
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[New diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus--why?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47836
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 20;120(16):1876-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2000
Author
V. Grill
T. Claudi
I. Følling
T. Jenssen
K. Hanssen
J. Jervell
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 20;120(16):1876-7
Date
Jun-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis
English Abstract
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Reference Values
United States
World Health Organization
Abstract
In 1997, the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus were changed in the USA; the WHO has also proposed changes in its criteria. The main difference from the previous set of WHo criteria is a lowering of the cut-off level of fasting plasma glucose to > or = 7.0 mmol/l. This article discusses the implications of new diagnostic criteria and recommends that the level of fasting plasma glucose for diagnosing diabetes is decreased to > or = 7.0 mmol/l in Norway as well.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 10;120(18):219311006749
PubMed ID
10925616 View in PubMed
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Plasma levels of marine n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular risk markers in renal transplant recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289343
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 07; 70(7):824-30
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2016
Author
I A Eide
D O Dahle
M Svensson
A Hartmann
A Åsberg
K S Bjerve
J H Christensen
E B Schmidt
M E Lauritsen
K Lund
T Jenssen
Author Affiliation
Section of Nephrology, Department Transplant Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 07; 70(7):824-30
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Fats - blood - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood - pharmacology
Female
Fish Oils - blood
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Kidney - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Phospholipids - metabolism
Pulse Wave Analysis
Risk factors
Seafood
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of death after renal transplantation. Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert potential cardio-protective metabolic effects and might reduce CV morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients (RTRs).
In this cross-sectional study of 1990 Norwegian RTRs, transplanted between 1999 and 2011, associations between plasma phospholipid marine n-3 PUFA levels and various CV risk markers at 10 weeks after transplant were evaluated.
Higher plasma marine n-3 PUFA levels were associated with lower resting heart rate (rHR), lower fasting plasma glucose (fPG) levels, lower plasma triglyceride levels and higher plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, but not docosahexaenoic acid, showed a positive association with plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Plasma marine n-3 PUFA levels were not associated with plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, pulse wave velocity or systolic and diastolic blood pressure. A negative association between plasma marine n-3 PUFA levels and CV mortality was weakened by additional adjustment for plasma triglyceride levels and rHR. The ratio of n-6 to n-3 PUFAs showed similar associations with CV risk markers as absolute plasma marine n-3 PUFA levels.
This is the first study in RTRs showing that marine n-3 PUFAs are negatively associated with rHR and fPG in addition to beneficial effects on plasma HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Especially, effects on autonomic nervous function and triglyceride metabolism might contribute to explain the lower CV mortality risk with higher plasma marine n-3 PUFA levels previously shown in this cohort.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26931669 View in PubMed
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[Revised national budget and peritoneal dialysis--all that glitters is not gold].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191196
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jun 30;121(17):2094
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2001
Author
T. Jenssen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jun 30;121(17):2094
Date
Jun-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Financing, Government
Hemodialysis, Home - economics
Humans
Norway
Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory - economics
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jun 10;121(15):177111464676
PubMed ID
11875911 View in PubMed
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[The need of special services in the future care of the mentally retarded].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229041
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 May 20;110(13):1721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1990
Author
T. Jenssen
W T Mørch
Author Affiliation
Oslo Vernepleierhøgskole.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 May 20;110(13):1721-7
Date
May-20-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Services Needs and Demand - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Health services research - trends
Humans
Intellectual Disability - nursing - rehabilitation
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
A proposal for deinstitutionalization of the mentally retarded in Norway passed the Norwegian Storting in May 1988. The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs has prepared guidelines for planning and implenting this reform. On 1 January 1991 the responsibility for providing the necessary services was transferred to the municipalities. Many problems have to be solved in order to ensure that the life of each mentally retarded person is qualitatively improved after normalization and integration into society. In July 1989 the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs issued a document which assumed that necessary specialists and special services for the mentally retarded already exist, and are being used. Our study has questioned this assumption as being incorrect or incomplete. We interviewed persons in charge of the system of health care in all 19 Norwegian counties. Our conclusions are as follows: The mentally retarded do receive specialist services in various areas of somatic medicine. Their needs as regards psychiatric care are not taken care of by psychiatric specialists in hospitals or at out-patient facilities. Data shows that the system of institutionalized health care for the mentally retarded provides unique services which are best described as systematically applied behaviour analyses. Such special competence is often lacking in the Norwegian health services otherwise. In order to ensure that the mentally retarded will receive the best possible care, this competence must be integrated into the future system of care. It is most importance to consider these problems without delay. This article also discusses organizing special training and treatment for the mentally retarded themselves and special training for the persons providing the care.
PubMed ID
2368058 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.