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Beyond health care: from public health policy to healthy public policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238819
Source
Can J Public Health. 1985 May-Jun;76 Suppl 1:9-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Can J Public Health. 1985 May-Jun;76 Suppl 1:9-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Public Health - trends
PubMed ID
4027852 View in PubMed
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Creating a healthy community: the preferred role for hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236608
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1986 Sep;63(6):22-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1986
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1986 Sep;63(6):22-3
Date
Sep-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Environment
Health promotion
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals
Humans
Ontario
PubMed ID
3758522 View in PubMed
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Creating health and health promoting hospitals: a worthy challenge for the twenty-first century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200441
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 1999;12(2-3):viii-xix
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 1999;12(2-3):viii-xix
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Canada
Health Facility Environment
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Hospital-Patient Relations
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Life Style
Occupational Health
Plants
Social Responsibility
Abstract
States that it seems self-evident that a hospital should be a healing environment, a healthy place to work, should not harm the health of the environment and should contribute to and be a source of health in the community, but argues that hospitals have not paid a great deal of attention to many of these issues until recently. Suggests that in recent years, a new and broader understanding of health promotion has led to a re-examination of the ways in which hospitals can be both healthy and health-promoting. Begins by exploring the broader concepts of health promotion that lay the foundation for the creation of healthy and health-promoting hospitals and provides some examples of how these approaches are being applied.
PubMed ID
10537852 View in PubMed
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Developing healthy communities. A five year project report from The Community Health Development Centre. Presented at The International Healthy Cities Conference. September 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232216
Source
Can J Public Health. 1988 Nov-Dec;79(6):416-9
Publication Type
Article

Future directions in population health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199425
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S68-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hancock
Author Affiliation
thancock@yorku.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S68-70
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Climate
Economics
Environmental health
Forecasting
Humans
Public Health - trends
Abstract
The long-term health of the population will be influenced by a number of major forces in the next century. In this brief review, particular emphasis is placed on environmental and economic forces. Major global environmental changes include climate change and global warming, resource depletion, ecotoxicity and reduced biodiversity. We do not yet know the impact on longevity of lifetime exposure to a mix of persistent toxic chemicals in our environment, since it has only been widespread in the past 40-50 years. The health impacts of global warming are only just beginning to be understood and could be profound. But perhaps the most profound threat to population health is economic growth, to the extent that it undermines environmental and social sustainability. We need a new form of capitalism, one that simultaneously increases environmental, social, economic and human capital, if population health is to be maintained in the 21st century.
PubMed ID
10686767 View in PubMed
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Indicators that count! Measuring population health at the community level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199433
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S22-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hancock
R. Labonte
R. Edwards
Author Affiliation
thancock@yorku.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S22-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Public Health
Abstract
We begin with a discussion of some vitally important conceptual and methodological issues. These issues concern our understanding of community, of health, of population health and its determinants, of the concept of 'measurement' and the values that underlie it, and our reasons for wishing to measure these constructs. We then present a framework for indicator categories, propose some criteria for indicator selection and suggest an initial set of core indicators. This indicator set reflects not simply health status--no matter how broadly defined--but also the environmental, social and economic determinants of health and the "healthfulness" of the community itself. Our most important conclusion is that if the information that is contained in the data of the indicator set is to be transformed into knowledge that can empower and emancipate the community, it has to be developed in consultation with the local community and local users of the information.
PubMed ID
10686755 View in PubMed
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Lalonde and beyond: looking back at "A New Perspective on the Health of Canadians".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237163
Source
Health Promot. 1986 May;1(1):93-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Health Promot. 1986 May;1(1):93-100
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biology
Canada
Environment
Health Services Administration
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Lalonde Report was published in 1974, and was the first significant government report to suggest that health care services were not the most important determinant of health. After reviewing the evidence, the report suggested that there were four "health fields"--lifestyle, environment, health care organization, human biology--and that major improvements in health would result primarily from improvements in lifestyle, environment and our knowledge of human biology. Lalonde also indicated a broad understanding of the determinants of health in subsequent speeches. While the report was greeted sympathetically at the time, it did not have all that significant an impact in Canada. It was criticised on a number of grounds, in particular that it paid too much attention to lifestyle and too little attention to environment. Furthermore, because health is a provincial responsibility in Canada, while the report was a federal report, there was no mechanism readily available to implement the recommendations of the report. The report was nonetheless widely hailed outside Canada, and similar (and often better) reports were published in Britain, the USA, Sweden and elsewhere. The report remains a highly regarded contribution to the transformation in thinking about health that has occurred in the past decade.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
10286856 View in PubMed
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Moving beyond healthcare: the role of healthcare organizations in creating healthy people in healthy communities in a healthy world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192380
Source
Hosp Q. 2001;4(4):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001

People, partnerships and human progress: building community capital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193645
Source
Health Promot Int. 2001 Sep;16(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Health Promot Int. 2001 Sep;16(3):275-80
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation - trends
Ecosystem
Environment Design
Forecasting
Health Behavior
Health Education - trends
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Life Style
Preventive Health Services - trends
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Victorian-era journal The Sanitarian used on its masthead the slogan 'A nation's health is a nation's wealth'. Today, we are re-discovering that wisdom, recognizing that health is indeed a form of wealth. Moreover, we are beginning to understand that wealth is not merely our economic capital, but includes three other forms of capital--social, natural and human capital. Health is one key element of human capital. A healthy community is one that has high levels of social, ecological, human and economic 'capital', the combination of which may be thought of as 'community capital'. The challenge for communities in the 21st century will be to increase all four forms of capital simultaneously. This means working with suitable partners in the private sector, making human development the central purpose of governance, and more closely integrating social, environmental and economic policy. Community gardens, sustainable transportation systems and energy conservation programmes in community housing projects are some of the ways in which we can build community capital.
PubMed ID
11509464 View in PubMed
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Public health planning in the City of Toronto--Part 1. Conceptual planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237042
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 May-Jun;77(3):180-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 May-Jun;77(3):180-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health planning
Humans
Ontario
Public Health
Urban health
PubMed ID
3742400 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.