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160 records – page 1 of 16.

[Adjusting for studied districts can be useful]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24068
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Apr 28;90(17):1636-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1993
Author
G. Steineck
T. Hakulinen
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Apr 28;90(17):1636-7
Date
Apr-28-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1993 Feb 17;90(7):608-10; discussion 6117786323
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1993 Feb 24;90(8):6848437487
PubMed ID
8487602 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age dependence of the west/east gradient in cardiovascular mortality of Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239310
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(5):463-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
L. Tenkanen
L. Teppo
T. Hakulinen
E. Läärä
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(5):463-71
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Coronary Disease - mortality
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
A cohort of 4 475 Finnish men was followed up during 1964-80 in order to study regional differences in mortality from cardiovascular diseases, especially ischaemic heart disease (IHD). The west/east gradient in cardiovascular mortality recorded in several previous studies was greatly age-dependent. The excess eastern risk was a feature of younger age groups; with increasing age the risk pattern was reversed. The risk factors in IHD in eastern Finland have an element which somehow accelerates the process of this disease.
PubMed ID
4091046 View in PubMed
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[Association between cancer and exposure to chlorophenols in a county located in southern Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227775
Source
Duodecim. 1991;107(9):702-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Association between influenza during pregnancy and childhood leukaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254198
Source
Br Med J. 1973 Nov 3;4(5887):265-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-1973
Author
T. Hakulinen
L. Hovi
Karkinen-Jääskeläinen
K. Penttinen
L. Saxén
Source
Br Med J. 1973 Nov 3;4(5887):265-7
Date
Nov-3-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Orthomyxoviridae - isolation & purification
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Abstract
This report based on the data available from the Finnish Cancer Registry and from virus isolations gives further support to the association (P=0.04) between maternal influenza of the 1957 "Asian" type and subsequent later leukaemia in the infants. No such association was found from other influenza epidemics.
Notes
Cites: Ann Clin Res. 1969 Dec;1(4):291-3005371916
Cites: Lancet. 1971 Dec 18;2(7738):1346-74108264
Cites: Br Med J. 1972 May 27;2(5812):485-84337948
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1972 Sep 15;114(2):239-424628993
Cites: Br Med J. 1972 Dec 16;4(5841):631-44674941
Cites: Br Med J. 1973 Mar 24;1(5855):706-84348514
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1972;47(4):449-524540994
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1960;49:114-2614442130
PubMed ID
4753239 View in PubMed
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Avoidable deaths and random variation in patients' survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124949
Source
Br J Cancer. 2012 May 22;106(11):1846-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2012
Author
K. Seppä
T. Hakulinen
E. Läärä
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Pieni Roobertinkatu 9, FI-00130, Helsinki, Finland. karri.seppa@cancer.fi
Source
Br J Cancer. 2012 May 22;106(11):1846-9
Date
May-22-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Random error in the numbers of avoidable deaths among cancer patients has not been considered in earlier studies.
Methods to obtain valid confidence intervals (CIs) for numbers of avoidable deaths were developed. The excess mortality rates were estimated for patients diagnosed with colon cancer in five cancer control regions in Finland during 2000-2007 using a relative survival regression model. Numbers of avoidable deaths due to colon cancer and other causes, respectively, were estimated in different scenarios.
Altogether, 4139 and 1335 out of 10 772 patients under 90 years at diagnosis were estimated to have died due to colon cancer and other causes, respectively, during the first 5 years after diagnosis. If all the patients had shared the relative survival of the largest cancer control region to which the country capital belongs, the estimated number of avoidable deaths would have been 146 (95% CI 3-290).
Random error in numbers of avoidable deaths, often substantial, can be quantified by realistic error margins, based on appropriate statistical methods.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2008 Nov;44(17):2661-718819791
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2009 Apr;45(6):931-9119171476
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S115-2419956155
Cites: Stat Med. 2010 Mar 30;29(7-8):885-9520213719
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2010 Sep 28;103(7):1109-1420717112
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2010 Dec 1;127(11):2630-820162669
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):730-5618639491
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2011 Sep;47(14):2202-1021549589
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol. 2011 Dec;35(6):526-3321606014
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol. 2012 Feb;36(1):e7-1221907655
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Jul 15;19(13):1729-4010861774
Cites: Stat Med. 2004 Jan 15;23(1):51-6414695639
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Jun;51(3):289-989229059
Cites: Stat Med. 2010 Nov 30;29(27):2781-9320862662
PubMed ID
22531640 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Cancer. 1994 Feb 1;56(3):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1994
Author
P. Knekt
A. Reunanen
H. Takkunen
A. Aromaa
M. Heliövaara
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1994 Feb 1;56(3):379-82
Date
Feb-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Iron - blood - metabolism
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transferrin - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
A high level of available tissue iron may increase the risk of cancer through its contribution to the production of free oxygen radicals. Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation levels were studied for their prediction of different cancers in a cohort of 41,276 men and women aged 20-74 years and initially free from cancer. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 2,469 primary cancer cases were diagnosed. Excess risks of colorectal and lung cancers were found in subjects with transferrin saturation level exceeding 60%. The relative risks, adjusted for age, sex and smoking, were 3.04 for colorectal cancer and 1.51 for lung cancer, in comparison with subjects having lower levels. The risk of lung cancer was inversely related to serum TIBC, with a relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles of 0.69 for men and 0.19 for women. For the risk of stomach cancer, we detected inverse relationships with serum iron and with transferrin saturation and a positive relationship with TIBC, but these associations weakened when the cancer cases occurring during the 5 first years of follow-up were excluded. High iron stores may increase the risk of colorectal cancer, whereas low iron stores may be an early sign of occult stomach cancer.
PubMed ID
8314326 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer after radiotherapy for skin hemangioma in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22784
Source
Radiat Res. 1996 Feb;145(2):225-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
M. Lundell
A. Mattsson
T. Hakulinen
L E Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Radiat Res. 1996 Feb;145(2):225-30
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gamma Rays
Hemangioma - radiotherapy
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Time Factors
X-rays
Abstract
Between 1920 and 1959, 9675 women were irradiated in infancy for skin hemangioma at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. They were exposed to low to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The mean age at first exposure was 6 months and the mean absorbed dose to the breast anlage was 0.39 Gy (range or = 50 years after exposure the ERR at 1 Gy was 2.25 (95% CI 0.59-5.62). The fitted excess absolute risk (EAR) was 22.9 per 10(4) breast-year gray. The breast absorbed dose and time after exposure were important risk determinants for breast cancer excess risk. Forty to 50 years of follow-up was necessary for the excess risk to be expressed. The study confirms previous findings that the breast anlage of female infants is sensitive to ionizing radiation.
PubMed ID
8606933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer and use of rauwolfia and other antihypertensive agents in hypertensive patients: a nationwide case-control study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250489
Source
Int J Cancer. 1976 Dec 15;18(6):727-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1976
Author
A. Aromaa
M. Hakama
T. Hakulinen
E. Saxén
L. Teppo
J. Idä lan-Heikkilä
Source
Int J Cancer. 1976 Dec 15;18(6):727-38
Date
Dec-15-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Carcinogens
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Insurance, Health
Middle Aged
Phytotherapy
Plants, Medicinal
Rauwolfia - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Registries
Risk
Abstract
Two nationwide registers, the Finnish Cancer Registry and a register of persons entitled to free drugs for hypertension, were linked in a case-control study of the association of breast cancer and use of rauwolfia. Cases were all hypertensive patients in whom breast cancer was diagnosed in 1973. To test the association specifically with rauwolfia, controls were hypertensive women matched with the cases for age and geographic area and approximately matched for duration of treatment for hypertension. There were 109 case-control pairs. Use of any physician-prescribed drugs during the year prior to diagnosis of breast cancer was ascertained from original prescriptions. In the first set of analyses the patients were classified according to the drug used during most days of the year ("main antihypertensive agent"). In the second set a person qualified as a user of the respective drug regardless of the amount taken. The relative risks in the use of rauwolfia, methyldopa, another synthetic antihypertensive or a diuretic as main antihypertensive agent all ranged between 0.90 and 1.11. The results based on use of a drug in any amount were similar. Next, pairs in which duration of treatment for hypertension was different for cases and controls were excluded. The relative risk associated with use of rauwolfia as main antihypertensive agent then increased from 1.00 to 1.30 and the risk associated with use of any amount of rauwolfia from 1.16 to 2.14. Simultaneously, the relative risk in the use of digitalis was raised from 1.33 to 2.67 and of nitroglycerin from 1.00 to 1.71. Cases also used more types of antihypertensive agents simultaneously than controls. There was no association between rauwolfia-use and breast cancer in analyses limited to pairs in which neither case nor control used digitalis. Thus, there was not a consistent drug-specific association between rauwolfia-use and breast cancer in hypertensive patients. An underlying association of hypertension, heart disease or its treatment (digitalis) and breast cancer may have confounded some of the results of this and earlier studies. In conclusion, it is unlikely that use of rauwolfia increases the risk of breast cancer.
PubMed ID
992904 View in PubMed
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CA 125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213328
Source
J Med Screen. 1996;3(1):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Hakama
U H Stenman
P. Knekt
J. Järvisalo
T. Hakulinen
J. Maatela
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Liisankatu 21, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Med Screen. 1996;3(1):40-2
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
CA-125 Antigen - blood
Case-Control Studies
False Positive Reactions
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sensitivity and specificity
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND - Screening for ovarian cancer is based on ultrasound, colour Doppler, and tumour markers. There is only limited evidence on their discriminatory performance and no evidence on their effectiveness in reducing mortality. OBJECTIVE - To investigate the discriminatory performance of CA 125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer. METHODS - A registry of 15 093 serum samples drawn in 1968-72 was linked to the cancer registry. During follow up between 1968 and 1980 24 ovarian cancers were identified. One or two matched case-control design nested within the sample bank was applied and the concentrations of CA 125 were assessed. RESULTS - Case-control differences (relative risk 4-0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 15.5 at 20 kU/1) were found. Detection rate of the CA 125 test was 21-33% and the true negative rate was 75-98% depending on the cut off level and interval between drawing of the blood sample and diagnosis of the cancer. CONCLUSION - CA 125 is not a valid screening test if used alone. Case-control differences of borderline significance were found in CA 125 before diagnosis of ovarian cancer, but they were not large enough to provide a sufficient detection rate.
PubMed ID
8861050 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence following chlorophenol exposure in a community in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223846
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Lampi
T. Hakulinen
T. Luostarinen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute-Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chlorophenols
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sarcoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Water Pollution, Chemical - adverse effects
Water Supply - standards
Wood
Abstract
Chlorophenols have contaminated the drinking water system and the local lake in the village of Järvelä in southern Finland. Local geology, ground water streams, and chemical analyses incriminated a local sawmill as the only plausible source of exposure. Cancer incidence in the municipality of Kärkölä (half of the population lives in Järvelä), compared with the rest of the local health-care district and with the greater cancer control region, indicated an excess of soft-tissue sarcomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A case-control study, which focused on cancers of the colon, bladder and soft tissues, lymphomas, and leukemia, demonstrated a significantly elevated risk ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas among persons who consumed fish from the local lake, which was contaminated with chlorophenols. Probable exposure to chlorophenol-contaminated drinking water played a role in the increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and possibly was a factor in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma.
PubMed ID
1596099 View in PubMed
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160 records – page 1 of 16.