Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

The association between childhood fractures and adolescence bone outcomes: a population-based study, the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287091
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2017 Nov 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-2017
Author
T. Christoffersen
N. Emaus
E. Dennison
A-S Furberg
L. Gracia-Marco
G. Grimnes
O A Nilsen
D. Vlachopoulos
A. Winther
L A Ahmed
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2017 Nov 16;
Date
Nov-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Childhood fracture may predict persistent skeletal fragility, but it may also reflect high physical activity which is beneficial to bone development. We observe a difference in the relationship between previous fracture and bone outcome across physical activity level and sex. Further elaboration on this variation is needed.
Childhood fracture may be an early marker of skeletal fragility, or increased levels of physical activity (PA), which are beneficial for bone mineral accrual. This study investigated the association between a previous history of childhood fracture and adolescent bone mineral outcomes by various PA levels.
We recruited 469 girls and 492 boys aged 15-18 years to this study. We assessed PA levels by questionnaire and measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at arm, femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH), and total body (TB) and calculated bone mineral apparent density (BMAD, g/cm(3)). Fractures from birth to time of DXA measurements were retrospectively recorded. We analyzed differences among participants with and without fractures using independent sample t test. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association between fractures and aBMD and BMC measurements according to adolescent PA.
Girls with and without a previous history of fracture had similar BMC, aBMD, and BMAD at all sites. In multiple regression analyses stratified by physical activity intensity (PAi), there was a significant negative association between fracture and aBMD-TH and BMC-FN yet only in girls reporting low PAi. There was a significant negative association between forearm fractures, BMAD-FN, and BMAD-arm among vigorously active boys.
Our findings indicate a negative association between childhood fractures and aBMD/BMC in adolescent girls reporting low PAi. In boys, such an association appears only in vigorously active participants with a history of forearm fractures.
PubMed ID
29147750 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between childhood fractures and adolescence bone outcomes: a population-based study, the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298131
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 02; 29(2):441-450
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
T Christoffersen
N Emaus
E Dennison
A-S Furberg
L Gracia-Marco
G Grimnes
O A Nilsen
D Vlachopoulos
A Winther
L A Ahmed
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Forskningsparken, Sykehusveien 21, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. tore.christoffersen@uit.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 02; 29(2):441-450
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adolescent
Bone Density - physiology
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Femur Neck - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Childhood fracture may predict persistent skeletal fragility, but it may also reflect high physical activity which is beneficial to bone development. We observe a difference in the relationship between previous fracture and bone outcome across physical activity level and sex. Further elaboration on this variation is needed.
Childhood fracture may be an early marker of skeletal fragility, or increased levels of physical activity (PA), which are beneficial for bone mineral accrual. This study investigated the association between a previous history of childhood fracture and adolescent bone mineral outcomes by various PA levels.
We recruited 469 girls and 492 boys aged 15-18 years to this study. We assessed PA levels by questionnaire and measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at arm, femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH), and total body (TB) and calculated bone mineral apparent density (BMAD, g/cm3). Fractures from birth to time of DXA measurements were retrospectively recorded. We analyzed differences among participants with and without fractures using independent sample t test. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association between fractures and aBMD and BMC measurements according to adolescent PA.
Girls with and without a previous history of fracture had similar BMC, aBMD, and BMAD at all sites. In multiple regression analyses stratified by physical activity intensity (PAi), there was a significant negative association between fracture and aBMD-TH and BMC-FN yet only in girls reporting low PAi. There was a significant negative association between forearm fractures, BMAD-FN, and BMAD-arm among vigorously active boys.
Our findings indicate a negative association between childhood fractures and aBMD/BMC in adolescent girls reporting low PAi. In boys, such an association appears only in vigorously active participants with a history of forearm fractures.
PubMed ID
29147750 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer and oral contraceptives: patterns of risk among parous and nulliparous women--further analysis of the Swedish-Norwegian material.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25533
Source
Contraception. 1989 May;39(5):471-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
O. Meirik
T M Farley
E. Lund
H O Adami
T. Christoffersen
P. Bergsjö
Author Affiliation
World Health Organization, Geneva 27, Switzerland.
Source
Contraception. 1989 May;39(5):471-5
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish-Norwegian case-control study comprising 473 women less than 45 years old with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 1984-85, and 722 age-matched control women, was reanalyzed to evaluate if nulliparous women who had used oral contraceptives (OCs) were at particular risk for breast cancer. The relative risk for nulliparous women who had used OCs for eight years or more was 4.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.4-13.1), and parous women with the same duration of use had relative risk 1.7 (0.7-4.2) as compared to nulliparous and parous women, respectively, who had never used OCs. Parous women who had used OCs for twelve years or more after their first full-term pregnancy had a relative risk of 3.0 (1.3-7.4). The findings from the study suggest that nulliparous women may be particularly susceptible to the risk for breast cancer with long-term OC use.
PubMed ID
2721197 View in PubMed
Less detail

High prevalence of myopia among medical students?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220954
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Jun;71(3):429
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
C. Hansen
T. Kristiansen
T. Christoffersen
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Jun;71(3):429
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Middle Aged
Myopia - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Students, Medical
Notes
Comment On: Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1992 Jun;70(3):317-221636390
PubMed ID
8362650 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of osteoporotic fracture type and subsequent fracture on mortality: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308485
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2020 Jan; 31(1):119-130
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
D Alarkawi
D Bliuc
T Tran
L A Ahmed
N Emaus
A Bjørnerem
L Jørgensen
T Christoffersen
J A Eisman
J R Center
Author Affiliation
Bone Biology Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. dunia.ark@gmail.com.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2020 Jan; 31(1):119-130
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Hip Fractures - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Spinal Fractures
Abstract
Less is known about the impact of non-hip non-vertebral fractures (NHNV) on early death. This study demonstrated increased risk of dying following hip and NHNV fractures which was further increased by a subsequent fracture. This highlights the importance of early intervention to prevent both initial and subsequent fractures and improve survival.
Osteoporotic fractures are a major health concern. Limited evidence exists on their impact on mortality in ageing populations. This study examined the contribution of initial fracture type and subsequent fracture on mortality in a Norwegian population that has one of the highest rates of fractures.
The Tromsø Study is a prospective population-based cohort in Norway. Women and men aged 50+ years were followed from 1994 to 2010. All incident hip and non-hip non-vertebral (NHNV) fractures were registered. NHNV fractures were classified as either proximal or distal. Information on self-reported co-morbidities, lifestyle factors, general health and education level was collected. Multivariable Cox models were used to quantify mortality risk with incident and subsequent fractures analysed as time-dependent variables.
Of 5214 women and 4620 men, 1549 (30%) and 504 (11%) sustained a fracture, followed by 589 (38%) and 254 (51%) deaths over 10,523 and 2821 person-years, respectively. There were 403 (26%) subsequent fractures in women and 68 (13%) in men. Hip fracture was associated with a two-fold increase in mortality risk (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.73-2.42 in women and 2.49, 95% CI 2.00-3.11 in men). Proximal NHNV fractures were associated with 49% and 81% increased mortality risk in women and men (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.21-1.84 and 1.81, 95% CI 1.37-2.41), respectively. Distal NHNV fractures were not associated with mortality. Subsequent fracture was associated with 89% and 77% increased mortality risk in women and men (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.52-2.35 and 1.77, 95% CI 1.16-2.71), respectively.
Hip, proximal NHNV and subsequent fractures were significantly associated with increased mortality risk in the elderly, highlighting the importance of early intervention.
PubMed ID
31654084 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injury to the cornea due to fish bile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51194
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Oct;19(5):358-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
T. Christoffersen
E G Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Tromsl, Norway.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Oct;19(5):358-9
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Bile Acids and Salts - adverse effects
Burns, Chemical - etiology
Cornea - drug effects - injuries
Corneal Edema - chemically induced
Corneal Opacity - chemically induced
Eye Burns - chemically induced
Female
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Male
Norway
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Visual Acuity - drug effects
Abstract
A retrospective study of 207 patients with chemical eye injuries in northern Norway revealed that fish bile was the causal agent in 14%. Fish bile caused superficial corneal erosions in 28 of 29 cases. All but one of the patients were professional fishermen or fish industry workers. In one case delayed medical care led to serious corneal opacity. Provided that there was immediate and abundant rinsing of the affected eye and good medical care, the prognosis of fish bile injuries was fairly good. The mechanisms for corneal damage due to fish bile are not clear.
PubMed ID
8296186 View in PubMed
Less detail

Oral contraceptive use and breast cancer in young women. A joint national case-control study in Sweden and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236545
Source
Lancet. 1986 Sep 20;2(8508):650-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1986
Author
O. Meirik
E. Lund
H O Adami
R. Bergström
T. Christoffersen
P. Bergsjö
Source
Lancet. 1986 Sep 20;2(8508):650-4
Date
Sep-20-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Norway
Risk
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The possible association between oral contraceptive (OC) use and the risk of breast cancer developing before the age of 45 was investigated by means of a population based case-control study in Sweden and Norway. Information was obtained by personal interview from 422 (89.2%) of all eligible patients with a newly diagnosed breast cancer from May, 1984, to May, 1985, and from 722 (80.6%) of all contacted age-matched controls. A multivariate analysis, which accounted for several possible confounding factors, revealed a significant (p = 0.03) association between total duration of OC use and breast cancer risk. The relative risk (RR) of breast cancer after 12 or more years of OC use was 2.2 (1.2-4.0). OC use for more than 7 years before first full-term pregnancy entailed an increased breast cancer risk (RR = 2.0 [1.0-4.2]) which was of borderline significance. When total duration of use was considered, the risk of breast cancer was virtually unrelated to age at first OC use and latency from first use. The results suggest that long-term use of OCs may increase the risk of breast cancer in young women.
PubMed ID
2876135 View in PubMed
Less detail

Oral contraceptive use and premenopausal breast cancer in Sweden and Norway: possible effects of different pattern of use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25450
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1989 Sep;18(3):527-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
E. Lund
O. Meirik
H O Adami
R. Bergstrøm
T. Christoffersen
P. Bergsjø
Author Affiliation
Institutt for Samfunnsmedisin, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1989 Sep;18(3):527-32
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Different use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in relation to reproductive histories and age might explain the conflicting results found in studies from different countries of OC use and premenopausal breast cancer. A population-based case-control study in Sweden and Norway has been analysed separately for the two countries. The study consists of 317 Swedish and 105 Norwegian cases diagnosed 1984-1985 with 317 Swedish and 210 Norwegian controls. The results for each country separately are consistent with the joint analysis showing increased risk for breast cancer with increased duration of OC use with the exception of that for women with more than 15 years since first use. The relative risk of breast cancer for more than four years of use among Norwegian women was 0.6 (95% confidence internal (Cl), 0.2-1.8). In both countries there was a non-significant higher risk associated with increasing duration of use before first full-term pregnancy. Analyses for surveillance bias show no evidence of bias as explanation for the association between total duration of OC use and breast cancer.
PubMed ID
2807653 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.