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A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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Clinical epidemiologic first-episode psychosis: 1-year outcome and predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163098
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2007 Jul;116(1):54-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
E. Simonsen
S. Friis
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
I. Melle
S. Opjordsmoen
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T. McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Roskilde Psychiatric University Hospital Fjorden, Roskilde, Denmark. rfes@ra.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2007 Jul;116(1):54-61
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Behavior
Abstract
To describe 1-year outcome in a large clinical epidemiologic sample of first-episode psychosis and its predictors.
A total of 301 patients with first-episode psychosis from four healthcare sectors in Norway and Denmark receiving common assessments and standardized treatment were evaluated at baseline, at 3 months, and at 1 year.
Substantial clinical and social improvements occurred within the first 3 months. At 1-year 66% were in remission, 11% in relapse, and 23% continuously psychotic. Female gender and better premorbid functioning were predictive of less severe negative symptoms. Shorter DUP was predictive for shorter time to remission, stable remission, less severe positive symptoms, and better social functioning. Female gender, better premorbid social functioning and more education also contributed to a better social functioning.
This first-episode sample, being well treated, may be typical of the early course of schizophrenia in contemporary centers.
PubMed ID
17559601 View in PubMed
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A comparative analysis of burn injuries at two burns centres in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35836
Source
Burns. 1994 Apr;20(2):173-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
B E Lindblad
S S Mikkelsen
T K Larsen
M S Steinke
Author Affiliation
University Departments of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Aarhus County Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Burns. 1994 Apr;20(2):173-5
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Burns - etiology - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In order to compare the epidemiology of burns and predisposing factors to burns at two burn centres representing the cities of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark, a prospective study was set up at the University Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Aarhus and the Centre of Plastic Surgery and Burns Unit, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. Several significant differences in the epidemiology of burns in the two populations were found. Considering the social circumstances, the situation in Aarhus was characterized by the fact that most patients lived in their own houses, had a larger family and a larger family income. At the Hvidovre Hospital, the patients more often lived in a flat, had a smaller family and a lower family income than the average.
PubMed ID
8198725 View in PubMed
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Early detection of psychosis: positive effects on 5-year outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140097
Source
Psychol Med. 2011 Jul;41(7):1461-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
T K Larsen
I. Melle
B. Auestad
U. Haahr
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
S. Opjordsmoen
B R Rund
J I Rossberg
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
S. Friis
T. McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Stavanger University Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, Stavanger, Norway. tkmaclarsen@mac.com
Source
Psychol Med. 2011 Jul;41(7):1461-9
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
During the last decades we have seen a new focus on early treatment of psychosis. Several reviews have shown that duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is correlated to better outcome. However, it is still unknown whether early treatment will lead to a better long-term outcome. This study reports the effects of reducing DUP on 5-year course and outcome.
During 1997-2000 a total of 281 consecutive patients aged >17 years with first episode non-affective psychosis were recruited, of which 192 participated in the 5-year follow-up. A comprehensive early detection (ED) programme with public information campaigns and low-threshold psychosis detection teams was established in one healthcare area (ED-area), but not in a comparable area (no-ED area). Both areas ran equivalent treatment programmes during the first 2 years and need-adapted treatment thereafter.
At the start of treatment, ED-patients had shorter DUP and less symptoms than no-ED-patients. There were no significant differences in treatment (psychotherapy and medication) for the 5 years. Mixed-effects modelling showed better scores for the ED group on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative, depressive and cognitive factors and for global assessment of functioning for social functioning at 5-year follow-up. The ED group also had more contacts with friends. Regression analysis did not find that these differences could be explained by confounders.
Early treatment had positive effects on clinical and functional status at 5-year follow-up in first episode psychosis.
Notes
Comment In: Psychol Med. 2012 Mar;42(3):669-7022099925
PubMed ID
20942996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71893
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2001
Author
J O Johannessen
T H McGlashan
T K Larsen
M. Horneland
I. Joa
S. Mardal
R. Kvebaek
S. Friis
I. Melle
S. Opjordsmoen
E. Simonsen
H. Ulrik
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Rogaland Psychiatric Hospital, P.O. Box 1163, Hillevåg, 4095, Stavanger, Norway. joj@rps.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Date
Aug-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Ethics, Medical
Female
Health education
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Abstract
Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing of treatment in first-episode psychosis. One health care sector (Rogaland, Norway) is experimental and has developed an early detection (ED) system to reduce DUP. Two other sectors (Ullevål, Norway, and Roskilde, Denmark) are comparison sectors and rely on existing detection and referral systems for first-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis.System variables and first results from the four-year inclusion period (1997-2000) are described. It includes targeted information towards the general public, health professionals and schools, and ED teams to recruit appropriate patients into treatment as soon as possible. This plus easy access to psychiatric services via ED teams systematically changed referral patterns of first-episode schizophrenia. DUP was reduced by 1.5 years (mean) from before the time the ED system was instituted (to 0.5 years). The ED strategies appear to be effective and to influence directly the community's help-seeking behaviour.
PubMed ID
11479064 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early identification of non-remission in first-episode psychosis in a two-year outcome study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141450
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Erik Simonsen
S. Friis
S. Opjordsmoen
E L Mortensen
U. Haahr
I. Melle
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Roskilde University and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. es@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Remission Induction
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify predictors of non-remission in first-episode, non-affective psychosis.
During 4 years, we recruited 301 patients consecutively. Information about first remission at 3 months was available for 299 and at 2 years for 293 cases. Symptomatic and social outcomes were assessed at 3 months, 1 and 2 years.
One hundred and twenty-nine patients (43%) remained psychotic at 3 months and 48 patients (16.4%) remained psychotic over 2 years. When we compared premorbid and baseline data for the three groups, the non-remitted (n = 48), remitted for
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):49421219270
PubMed ID
20722632 View in PubMed
Less detail

First-episode schizophrenia: I. Early course parameters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52772
Source
Schizophr Bull. 1996;22(2):241-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
T K Larsen
T H McGlashan
L C Moe
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Schizophr Bull. 1996;22(2):241-56
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Disease Progression
Episode of Care
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Research - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Terminology
Time Factors
Abstract
Concepts and definitions pertaining to the early course of schizophrenia are reviewed, along with recent illustrative studies of first-episode schizophrenia. Early course parameters of a Norwegian first-episode sample are presented. This sample (n = 43) demonstrated strong gender differences, with male patients having significantly higher frequency of single marital status, lower educational status, schizophrenia, early age at onset, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores the last year before hospitalization. The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was long (mean = 114 weeks), as in other studies. Longer DUP was associated with poorer work, social, and global functioning in the year before admission, with more insidious onset of psychosis, and with more negative symptoms at first clinical presentation. Longer DUP was not associated with the age at onset of psychosis. These findings were mostly gender independent. The data help to frame questions about why patients can be psychotic for so long before getting help. Finally, suggestions are offered for the definition and measurement of early course parameters for schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
8782284 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Relapse as quality indicator in psychiatric treatment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197144
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 10;120(18):2144-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2000
Author
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
Author Affiliation
Rogaland psykiatriske sjukehus, Stavanger. jo.johannessen@rps.netpower.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 10;120(18):2144-7
Date
Aug-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards
Norway
Patient Readmission
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Recurrence
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
Efficiency and productivity expressed by length of hospitalisation, number of admissions, treated patients per time unit, and cost in NOK are incomplete measures for quality in a medical context. These measures should be supplemented by measures of results based on the course of illness for specific diagnostic categories. Few psychiatric institutions, including outpatient units, record the course of illness on a regular basis.
A review of the literature shows that rough measures of results, for instance readmission rates, often form the basis for evaluation of course/treatment results. The article gives examples of measures like readmission rates and more scientific measures such as Positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) used to measure results in a Norwegian psychiatric hospital.
Of all first time admitted patients to Rogaland Psychiatric Hospital in 1985 and 1990, 40% of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were readmitted after one year. For first time admitted patients from 1993 and 1994, the remission rate was 56% measured by PANSS.
The results of the treatment of first time admitted patients with a schizophrenia diagnosis were poorer than what is suggested possible through studies of optimal treatment, where the remission percentage is estimated to be 80% after one year. Rough measures of results, like readmission, do not seem to differ considerably from the results measured by PANSS. Norwegian psychiatric institutes are recommended to monitor the quality of treatment through a systematic recording of relapse among patients with a first time schizophrenia diagnosis.
PubMed ID
11006734 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Student nurse education in psychiatry and psychiatric health and nursing care: more attention to needs of students provides a more diversified education].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244759
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1981 Feb 4;81(5):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-4-1981

9 records – page 1 of 1.