Skip header and navigation

Refine By

30 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:77-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
M U Jakobsen
T. Berentzen
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Centre for Health And Society, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. muj@dce.au.dk
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:77-87
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Denmark
Fatty Liver - metabolism
Humans
Obesity - metabolism
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that visceral fat releases free fatty acids and adipokines and thereby exposes the liver to fat accumulation. The authors aimed to evaluate current epidemiologic evidence for an association between abdominal fat and liver fat content. Clinical and epidemiologic studies with data on abdominal fat and liver fat content were reviewed. Studies using waist circumference to estimate abdominal fat mass suggested a direct association between abdominal fat and liver fat content. Studies using imaging methods suggested a direct association between intraabdominal fat and liver fat content, but not between subcutaneous abdominal fat and liver fat content. In conclusion, clinical and epidemiologic studies of abdominal fat and liver fat content suggest a direct association between abdominal fat and liver fat content which is probably accounted for by visceral fat. However, results from the included studies do not allow strong conclusions regarding the temporal sequence of events. Future longitudinal studies are recommended to obtain additional information on associations and mechanisms. Both abdominal fat depots and other body compartments of interest should be included to further investigate the association between specific fat depots and liver fat content. Biomarkers may provide insight into underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
17478441 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between nutritional conditions during World War II and childhood anthropometric variables in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30273
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2004 May-Jun;31(3):342-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Angell-Andersen
S. Tretli
R. Bjerknes
T. Forsén
T I A Sørensen
J G Eriksson
L. Räsänen
T. Grotmol
Author Affiliation
Department of Heredity, Hormones, and Lifestyle, Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. elisabeth.andersen@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2004 May-Jun;31(3):342-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Supply
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia - epidemiology
War
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to examine the height and weight in Nordic children during the years around World War II (WWII), and compare them with the nutritional situation during the same period. METHODS: Information on food consumption and energy intake were obtained from the literature. Anthropometric data were collected from the Nordic capitals and cover the period from 1930 to 1960 for ages 7-13 years. RESULTS: The greatest energy restriction took place in Norway (20%), followed by Finland (17%), while Sweden and Denmark had a restriction of 4-7% compared to pre-war levels. The most pronounced effect of WWII on height and weight is seen in Norwegian children, while some effect is observed for the youngest children in Finland. Little or no effect is seen in Sweden and Denmark. CONCLUSION: The Nordic children were affected by WWII in terms of a transient reduction in temporal trends in height and weight, and the magnitude of this decrease was associated with the severity of the energy restriction prevailing in the respective country during the war. These findings warrant further studies of the chronic diseases associated with height and weight for cohorts being in their growth periods during WWII.
PubMed ID
15204349 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body composition and body fat distribution in relation to later risk of acute myocardial infarction: a Danish follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137399
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
J G Stegger
E B Schmidt
T. Obel
T L Berentzen
A. Tjønneland
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Jakob.Stegger@rn.dk
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but lean body mass (LBM) may also be an important factor. Low LBM may increase the risk of MI and LBM may modify the effect of obesity on MI. Thus, the inability of the classical anthropometric measures to evaluate LBM may lead to misclassification of MI risk in both lean and obese persons. We investigated the associations between incident MI and bioelectrical impedance analyses (BIA) derived measures of body composition in combination with body mass index (BMI) and anthropometric measures of body fat distribution.
From 1993 to 1997, 27?148 men and 29?863 women, aged 50 to 64 year, were recruited into the Danish prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health. During 11.9 years of follow-up we identified 2028 cases of incident MI (1487 men and 541 women). BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and BIA of body composition including body fat mass (BFM), body fat percentage and LBM were measured at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazard models with age as time axis and performed extensive control for confounding. Weight, BMI, classical estimates of abdominal obesity and BIA estimates of obesity showed significant positive associations with incident MI. However, BFM adjusted for WC showed no association. Low LBM was associated with a higher risk of incident MI in both genders, and high LBM was associated with a higher risk in men.
Obesity was positively associated with MI. Estimates of obesity achieved by BIA seemed not to add additional information to classical anthropometric measures regarding MI risk. Both high and low LBM may be positively associated with MI.
PubMed ID
21285940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277400
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;34:64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
H J Sørensen
M. Gamborg
T I A Sørensen
J L Baker
E L Mortensen
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;34:64-9
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Birth weight
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Abstract
Childhood leanness is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the effects of gender, age at anthropometric measurements and age at first diagnosis on this relationship are unclear. The present study aimed at elucidating these associations.
Population-based cohort study with childhood anthropometric measures obtained annually from the age of 7 to 13 years in 253,353 Danes born 1930-1976 and followed to 31 December 2010. During this period, 4936 were registered with schizophrenia. The associations of childhood BMI with risk of schizophrenia were estimated with Cox regression models.
Childhood BMI was significantly inversely associated with risk of schizophrenia, however with different patterns among boys and girls. In boys, childhood BMI had an inverse non-linear association with schizophrenia risk dependent on age at diagnosis; in particular, a surprisingly strong association was found between leanness and later onset of schizophrenia. In girls, the risk of schizophrenia decreased linearly with increasing BMI z-score (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88-0.98). In both boys and girls, birth weight was inversely associated with later risk. In girls, but not in boys, birth weight appeared to significantly modify the associations; there was a somewhat stronger inverse association in the lowest birth weight category.
Birth weight as well as childhood BMI at ages 7 through 13 years is associated with risk of schizophrenia in both genders, but with a particular high risk of late-onset in lean boys irrespective of birth weight, and in lean girls with low birth weight. If replicated, these observations may inform preventive efforts build on schizophrenia trajectories rooted in early life.
PubMed ID
26967349 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood body mass index and the risk of prostate cancer in adult men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257932
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Jul 8;111(1):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2014
Author
J. Aarestrup
M. Gamborg
M B Cook
T I A Sørensen
J L Baker
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, The Capital Region, Nordre Fasanvej 5, Frederiksberg, 2000 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Jul 8;111(1):207-12
Date
Jul-8-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prostate cancer aetiology is poorly understood. It may have origins early in life; previously we found a positive association with childhood height. The effects of early life body mass index (BMI; kg m(-2)) on prostate cancer remain equivocal. We investigated if childhood BMI, independently and adjusted for height, is positively associated with adult prostate cancer.
Subjects were a cohort of 125208 boys formed from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, born 1930-1969 with height and weight measurements at 7-13 years. Cases were identified through linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed.
Overall, 3355 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Body mass index during childhood was positively associated with adult prostate cancer. The hazard ratio of prostate cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-1.10) per BMI z-score at age 7, and 1.05 (95% CI: 1.01-1.10) per BMI z-score at age 13. Estimates were similar and significant at all other ages. However, adjustment for childhood height attenuated the associations at all but the youngest ages as most estimates became nonsignificant.
These results suggest that at most childhood ages, BMI does not confer an additional risk for prostate cancer beyond that of height.
PubMed ID
24867696 View in PubMed
Less detail

Combined influence of leisure-time physical activity and hip circumference on all-cause mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116365
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jan;21(1):E78-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J N Østergaard
M. Grønbaek
L. Angquist
P. Schnohr
T I A Sørensen
B L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. jnos@soci.au.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jan;21(1):E78-85
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Size
Cause of Death
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Hip
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology
Muscular Atrophy - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Hip circumference has been shown to be inversely associated with mortality. Muscle atrophy in the gluteofemoral region may be a possible explanation and thus physical activity is likely to play an important role.
To estimate the combined effects of hip circumference and physical activity on mortality.
From the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 3,358 men and 4,350 women aged 21 to 93 years without pre-existing diagnosis of diabetes, stroke, ischemic heart disease, or cancer in 1991-1994 and with complete information on the variables of interest were included in the analyses. The participants were followed to 2009 in the Danish Civil Registration System, with 1.3% loss to follow-up and 2,513 deaths. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for combinations of physical activity and hip circumference.
Hip circumference was inversely associated with mortality irrespective of being physically active or not. However, being physically active seemed to counterbalance some of the adverse health effects of a small hip circumference; when comparing inactive to active, the excess mortality at the 25th percentile of hip circumference is 40% in men (HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.14-1.72) and 33% in women (HR = 1.33, CI: 1.10-1.62). These associations were observed after adjustment for waist circumference and weight change in the 6 months before the examination.
Less effects of physical activity were found in individuals with greater hip circumferences. A small hip circumference appears hazardous to survival. However, being physically active may counterbalance some of the hazardous effects of a small hip circumference.
PubMed ID
23404691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Common variants near MC4R in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits and energy expenditure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147829
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jan;34(1):182-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
S I I Kring
C. Holst
S. Toubro
A. Astrup
T. Hansen
O. Pedersen
T I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Centre for Health and Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jan;34(1):182-9
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Cholesterol, HDL - blood - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Energy Metabolism - genetics
Genetic Variation - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Phenotype
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4 - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Common variants near melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) have been related to fatness and type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of rs17782313 and rs17700633 in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits, weight development and energy expenditure.
Obese young men (n = 753, BMI > or = 31.0 kg m(-2)) and a randomly selected group (n = 874) identified from a population of 174 800 men were re-examined in three surveys at mean ages 35, 46 and 49 years (S-35, S-46 and S-49). Measurements were available at upto eight times from birth to adulthood. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess odds ratio (OR) for the presence of the carrier allele for a given difference in phenotypic values.
Rs17782313 minor C-allele was associated with overall, abdominal and peripheral fatness (range of OR = 1.06-1.14 per z-score units) at all three surveys, although only consistently significant at S-35 and S-46. Rs17700633 minor A-allele was also associated with the fatness measures, but significantly so only at S-49 for overall and abdominal fatness (range of OR = 1.03-1.15 per z-score units), and peripheral fatness (OR = 1.15-1.20 per z-score units). There were only few significant associations with metabolic traits. The rs17782313 C-allele and the rs17700633 A-allele were both associated with lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (range of OR = 0.64-0.84 per mol l(-1)), significantly at S-46. The rs17700633 A-allele was significantly associated with insulin (OR = 1.25 per 50 pmol l(-1)), leptin (OR = 1.42 per 10 ng microl(-1)) and insulin sensitivity (OR = 0.81 per model unit). The rs17782313 C-allele and the rs17700633 A-allele were both associated with BMI in childhood and adolescence (range of OR = 1.04-1.17 per z-score units), significant for the rs17782313 C-allele at the age of 13-19 years and for rs17700633 A-allele at age 7, 10, 13 and 19 years. No significant associations were found for energy expenditure.
Near MC4R variants appear to contribute to body fat, body fat distribution, some metabolic traits, weight development during childhood, but not to energy expenditure.
PubMed ID
19844209 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contributions and potentials of Swedish twin research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188458
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Sep;252(3):181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002

Differences in gestational weight gain between pregnancies before and after maternal bariatric surgery correlate with differences in birth weight but not with scores on the body mass index in early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264961
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2014 Dec;9(6):427-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
D. Berglind
M. Willmer
E. Näslund
P. Tynelius
T I A Sørensen
F. Rasmussen
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2014 Dec;9(6):427-34
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - statistics & numerical data
Birth weight
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Large maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with increased birth weight and increased risk of obesity in offspring, but these associations may be confounded by genetic and environmental factors. The aim was to investigate the effects of differences in GWG in all three trimesters on differences in birth weight and in body mass index (BMI) scores at 4 and 6 years of age, within siblings born before and after bariatric surgery.
Women with at least one child born before and one after bariatric surgery were identified in national Swedish registers. Series of weight (and height) measurements were collected from antenatal medical records, with data on the nearest pregnancies before and after bariatric surgery.
The age-adjusted means of pre- and post-operative GWG of 124 women were 11.3 (standard deviation [SD] 7.2) and 8.3 (SD 6.4)?kg, respectively (P?=?0.01). Adjusted fixed effects regression models showed positive associations of differences in mean total GWG with differences in siblings' birth weight, 0.023?kg per 1-kg greater weight gain (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.014-0.069) and for second trimester 0.53?kg for each 1-kg greater weight per week (95% CI: 0.32-1.61), whereas no associations were found with BMI in pre-school age.
This study showed positive associations between differences in total and second trimester maternal GWG and differences in children's birth weight, but no association with BMI scores in pre-school age. Maternal genetic, social and lifestyle factors fixed from one pregnancy to the next were taken into account in the analyses by the study design.
PubMed ID
24339139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early child care and obesity at 12 months of age in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266330
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jan;39(1):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
S E Benjamin Neelon
C. Schou Andersen
C. Schmidt Morgen
M. Kamper-Jørgensen
E. Oken
M W Gillman
T I A Sørensen
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jan;39(1):33-8
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Play and Playthings
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Socioeconomic Factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
Evidence suggests that the child care environment may be more obesogenic than the family home, and previous studies have found that child care use may be associated with obesity in children. Few studies, however, have focused on child care during infancy, which may be an especially vulnerable period. This study examined child care use in infancy and weight status at 12 months of age in a country where paid maternity leave is common and early child care is not as prevalent as in other developed countries.
We studied 27,821 children born to mothers participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort, a longitudinal study of pregnant women enrolled between 1997 and 2002, who were also included in the Childcare Database, a national record of child care use in Denmark. The exposure was days in child care from birth to 12 months. The outcomes were sex-specific body mass index (BMI) z-score and overweight/obesity (BMI ? 85th percentile based on the World Health Organization classification) at 12 months. We conducted multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses examining child care use and weight outcomes.
A total of 17,721 (63.7%) children attended child care during their first year of life. After adjustment for potential confounders, a 30-day increment of child care was associated with a modestly higher BMI z-score at 12 months (0.03 units; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.01, 0.05; P=0.003). Similarly, child care use was associated with increased odds of being overweight/obese at 12 months of age (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.10; P=0.047).
Child care in the first year of life was associated with slightly higher weight at 12 months, suggesting that child care settings may be important targets for obesity prevention in infancy.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e6986023894553
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(3):323-917530555
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Jan;38(1):53-924080793
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2014 Feb;50(2):514-2523772818
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2014 Mar-Apr;28(4):e92-10324200332
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2014 Jul;18(5):1246-5724065371
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2013 Jan;9 Suppl 1:105-1923167588
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Oct;34(10):1480-620498654
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1257-6420861173
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2010 Nov;99(11):1675-820528793
Cites: Child Care Health Dev. 2011 May;37(3):385-9321276039
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Jul;35(7):891-820975725
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Mar;36(2):153-6018519279
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1587-918541543
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1769-7518541567
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1776-8418541568
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008 Jul;162(7):627-3318606933
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Aug;122(2):322-3018676550
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Oct;35(4):352-618701236
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Aug;124(2):555-6219651579
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Oct;45(4):344-5019766938
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Jun;164(6):567-7120530308
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 May;11(5):389-9819619261
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jul;34(7):1160-820142828
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Sep;111(9):1343-6221872698
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;40(5):1238-4621624932
Cites: Int Rev Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;24(3):176-8822724639
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Oct;36(10):1306-1122907690
Cites: Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Dec;33(1):1-1123294916
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):e24-823239621
Cites: J Pediatr. 2013 Apr;162(4):753-758.e123140878
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):300-711775787
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Jan 1;155(1):95-10011772790
Cites: J Intern Med. 2002 Jan;251(1):35-4311851863
Cites: Obes Rev. 2001 May;2(2):73-8612119665
Cites: Child Dev. 2003 Jul-Aug;74(4):1006-2012938695
Cites: Lancet. 2004 May 15;363(9421):1642-515145640
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;80(1):199-20315213049
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jan;29(1):60-615534612
Cites: J Pediatr. 2005 May;146(5):618-2515870664
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):324-3016469991
Cites: Future Child. 2006 Spring;16(1):143-6816532662
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Apr;15(4):977-8517426333
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 May;8(3):187-917444960
Cites: Pediatrics. 2013 Dec;132(6):1006-1324276843
PubMed ID
25233894 View in PubMed
Less detail

30 records – page 1 of 3.