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Accidental and intentional violent deaths among British Columbia native Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234989
Source
Can J Public Health. 1987 Jul-Aug;78(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article

The association between population-based treatment guidelines and adjuvant therapy for node-negative breast cancer. British Columbia/Ontario Working Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210113
Source
Br J Cancer. 1997;75(10):1534-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
C. Sawka
I. Olivotto
A. Coldman
V. Goel
E. Holowaty
T G Hislop
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1997;75(10):1534-42
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
British Columbia
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cohort Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Tamoxifen - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
This study evaluated the impact of province-wide treatment guidelines on consistency of adjuvant therapy for node-negative breast cancer. A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, which has province-wide guidelines, and Ontario, which does not. All eligible 1991 incident cases of node-negative breast cancer in British Columbia (n = 942) and a similar number of randomly selected 1991 incident cases in Ontario (n = 938) were reviewed. Consistency of adjuvant therapy received was evaluated by stratifying cases into discrete diagnostic groups using several grouping systems, and by then comparing the distribution of treatments received within each diagnostic group in the two provinces. Recursive partitioning was also performed. We observed that patterns of pathology reporting were consistent with awareness of the factors used in the British Columbia guidelines to define indications for adjuvant therapy. Consistency of care was greater in British Columbia than in Ontario by all diagnostic grouping systems and by recursive partitioning (P
Notes
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1994 Sep;12(9):1783-88083701
Cites: Health Rep. 1993;5(2):157-778292756
Cites: Qual Health Care. 1995 Mar;4(1):55-6410142039
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Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1987 Mar;5(3):504-113819812
Cites: Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1988;4(1):27-3310287110
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1988;41(5):495-5013367181
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1988 Jul;6(7):1076-872856862
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Cites: Cancer. 1993 Nov 15;72(10):2986-928221566
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1995 Feb;13(2):502-127844612
PubMed ID
9166950 View in PubMed
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Barriers to cervical cytology screening in native women in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224853
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1992;16(5-6):337-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Deschamps
P R Band
T G Hislop
H F Clarke
J M Smith
V. To Yee Ng
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Biometry and Occupational Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Canada.
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1992;16(5-6):337-9
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis
Compliance
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
The British Columbia (BC) Cervical Cytology Screening Programme (CCSP), implemented since 1955, has resulted in a 75% decrease in both the mortality from and incidence of invasive squamous cervical carcinoma. However, despite this effect, the Native Indian population still present an overall mortality rate four times higher than that of the non-Native population. A demonstration project was initiated in four Native Indian Band communities of BC to determine the reasons underlying these findings. The participation patterns to the CCSP were investigated and revealed that the overall percentage of participation to the CCSP among Native Indian women was 30% lower than that of the non-Native population. Reasons for the under-participation to the CCSP were explored. A total of 36 women, 9 in each of the 4 communities, including current users, ex-users and never users, were interviewed. Reasons for not participating in the CCSP were due mainly to (1) the lack of knowledge about the Pap test and about its importance; (2) feelings of embarrassment and shamefulness; (3) lack of continuity of care due to the high turnover of physicians in the Native communities. Based on the study findings, a pilot CCSP clinic will be implemented in each community. In addition to taking cervical smears, this pilot project will include education sessions, notification about the results of the test, and recall for annual check up.
PubMed ID
1473122 View in PubMed
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Breast disease in nurses, a 30-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245227
Source
Can Nurse. 1980 Dec;76(11):38-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980

The British Columbia Mammography Screening Program: evaluation of the first 15 months.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225093
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992 Jan;158(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L J Burhenne
T G Hislop
H J Burhenne
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992 Jan;158(1):45-9
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
British Columbia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Mammography - economics
Mass Screening - economics - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Abstract
We report our experiences in the first 15 months of a government-funded pilot project begun in 1988 to study the feasibility of rapid throughput, low-cost screening mammography in British Columbia. The primary goals of the project were (1) to determine the unit cost of screening mammography within the context of the program; (2) to design and put into operation a centralized system of data collection, analysis, and quality control to enable calculations of cancer detection rates, biopsy rates, biopsy yield ratios, staging, and other specific cancer characteristics; and (3) to study compliance in the community where the program was offered. A total of 11,824 women had mammography at a unit cost of U.S. $32.66. Computerized analysis revealed that (1) 11% of women had known primary risk factors; (2) findings on mammograms were interpreted as abnormal in 9% of screening examinations; (3) breast cancers were confirmed in 47 (22%) of 211 patients who had biopsies, and 87% of these were stage 0-1. The overall cancer detection rate was four per 1000, with five per 1000 for women who had not had mammography in the preceding 2 years and one per 1000 for women who had had mammography in the past 2 years. The results show that screening mammography can be conducted at low cost. Data collection and analysis and compliance were sufficiently convincing to initiate province-wide expansion.
Notes
Comment In: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992 Aug;159(2):430-1; author reply 431-21307858
Comment In: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992 Jan;158(1):55-71727358
PubMed ID
1307850 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer screening in Canadian Native women. Adequacy of the Papanicolaou smear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219112
Source
Acta Cytol. 1994 Jan-Feb;38(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
T G Hislop
P R Band
M. Deschamps
H F Clarke
J M Smith
V T Ng
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Biometry and Occupational Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Acta Cytol. 1994 Jan-Feb;38(1):29-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Mass Screening - standards
Middle Aged
Papanicolaou test
Quality Control
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - standards
Abstract
Cervical cancer mortality remains high in Canadian Native women in British Columbia. Underutilization of the Provincial Cytology Screening Program by Canadian Native women has been documented. Another potential factor is the quality of specimens obtained. Proportions of unsatisfactory smears and smears lacking endocervical cells, which reflect the sampling technique, were compared between Canadian Native and other British Columbian women. The findings suggest that differences in the quality of cytologic smears do not explain the observed discrepancy in cervical cancer mortality between Canadian Native and non-Native populations.
PubMed ID
8291352 View in PubMed
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Cervical cytology screening. How can we improve rates among First Nations women in urban British Columbia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211217
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 Sep;42:1701-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
T G Hislop
H F Clarke
M. Deschamps
R. Joseph
P R Band
J. Smith
N. Le
R. Atleo
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Cancer Prevention, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 Sep;42:1701-8
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Mass Screening - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Papanicolaou test
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Residence Characteristics
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - psychology - utilization
Abstract
To determine Pap smear screening rates among urban First Nations women in British Columbia; to identify facilitators and barriers; and to develop, implement, and evaluate specific interventions to improve Pap smear screening in Vancouver.
Computer records of band membership lists and the Cervical Cytology Screening Program registry were compared to determine screening rates; personal interviews and community meetings identified facilitators and barriers to urban screening programs. A community advisory committee and the project team collaborated on developing specific interventions.
Purposive sample of British Columbia First Nations women, focusing on women living in Vancouver.
Poster, art card, and follow-up pamphlet campaign; articles in First Nations community papers; community meetings; and Pap smear screening clinics for First Nations women.
Pap smear screening rates among BC First Nations women according to residence and reasons for not receiving Pap smears.
Pap smear screening rates were substantially lower among First Nations women than among other British Columbia women; older women had even lower rates. No clear differences were found among First Nations women residing on reserves, residing in Vancouver, or residing off reserves elsewhere in British Columbia. Facilitators and barriers to screening were similar among women residing on reserves and in Vancouver. Many First Nations women are greatly affected by health care providers' attitudes, abilities to provide clear information, and abilities to establish trusting relationships.
Family physicians are an important source of information and motivation for Pap smear screening among First Nations women.
Notes
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 Apr 2;296(6627):975-83129115
Cites: Prev Med. 1989 Jan;18(1):133-462710757
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 1992;16(5-6):337-91473122
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Dec 15;147(12):1802-41458421
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;83(5):344-51473059
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Nov 15;145(10):1301-251933712
PubMed ID
8828873 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and risk of prostate cancer: a population-based case-control study in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207762
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1997 Aug;6(4):382-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
T E Rohan
T G Hislop
G R Howe
R P Gallagher
C Z Teh
P. Ghadirian
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1997 Aug;6(4):382-8
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Rate
Abstract
The relationship between cigarette smoking and risk of prostate cancer was examined in a case-control study conducted in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada. In each centre, cases were men with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the prostate notified to the provincial cancer registry. In Ontario, controls were selected randomly from assessment lists maintained by the Ontario Ministry of Revenue and were frequency matched to the cases on age. In British Columbia, controls were also frequency matched to the cases on age and were selected randomly from a roster maintained by the Medical Services Plan of British Columbia. The study in Ontario was conducted between April 1990 and April 1992, and that in British Columbia was conducted between January 1989 and December 1991. In all, the study included 408 cases (207 in Ontario and 201 in British Columbia) and 407 controls (207 in Toronto and 200 in British Columbia (one case was unmatched). Overall, there was little variation in risk of prostate cancer with pack-years of cigarette consumption (filter and non-filter cigarettes combined), and there was no evidence for an effect confined to filter or non-filter cigarettes. There was some evidence for a positive association with non-filter cigarettes in British Columbia, but on formal testing for heterogeneity, this finding was not inconsistent with the absence of an association in Ontario. There was also little variation in risk by years since first smoked or (for ex-smokers) by years since quitting. These data provide little support for an association between cigarette smoking and prostate cancer risk.
PubMed ID
9370102 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and the risk of anogenital cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224507
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jan 15;135(2):180-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1992
Author
J R Daling
K J Sherman
T G Hislop
C. Maden
M T Mandelson
A M Beckmann
N S Weiss
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98104.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jan 15;135(2):180-9
Date
Jan-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Penile Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Precipitating Factors
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between cigarette smoking and cervical cancer has been demonstrated in numerous prior studies. As part of population-based case-control studies of cancers of the vulva, vagina, cervix, anus, and penis in relation to infection with human papillomavirus, conducted in western Washington State and the province of British Columbia from the mid 1980s until the present time, the authors have collected detailed information on smoking history. The proportion of subjects who were current smokers of cigarettes ranged from slightly over 40% among incident cases of vaginal and cervical cancer to 60% among cases of vulvar and anal cancer. In contrast, only about 25% of controls were current smokers. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) associated with current smoking were substantially elevated (OR = 1.9-14.6) for all cancer sites except cancer of the vagina (OR = 1.3). The risks tended to increase in proportion to the number of cigarettes smoked. For most cancer sites, the odds ratios associated with former smoking were substantially less than those associated with current smoking and diminished with increasing time since cessation of smoking. The authors' data and those of other investigators suggest that cigarette smoking plays a role in the etiology of anogenital cancers and that smoking has a late-stage or promotional effect.
PubMed ID
1311142 View in PubMed
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Compliance with practice guidelines for node-negative breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210296
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1997 Jan;15(1):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
A. Olivotto
A J Coldman
T G Hislop
C H Trevisan
J. Kula
V. Goel
C. Sawka
Author Affiliation
Division of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. iolivotto@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1997 Jan;15(1):216-22
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology - therapy
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Referral and Consultation
Tamoxifen - therapeutic use
Abstract
Practice guidelines for cancer management have been in use in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada, since the mid 1970s. To evaluate practice guideline compliance, treatment received was compared with treatment recommended in a population-based cohort of women with breast cancer.
All incident cases (n = 939) of invasive, pathologically node-negative breast cancer diagnosed in 1991 were identified from the BC Cancer Registry. Treatment details were abstracted from cancer clinic records for cases referred to the BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) (n = 661) and original source documents for nonreferred cases. Management decisions were considered compliant if the patient received the recommended treatment or was entered onto a randomized trial of the modality being assessed.
Overall compliance with adjuvant therapy guidelines was 97% for radiotherapy, 96% for chemotherapy, and 89% for tamoxifen. An oncology specialist was consulted by 94% of patients with an indication for adjuvant treatment and by 58% of those without an indication (odds ratio [OR] = 10.7; 95% confidence interval, 7.0 to 16.4). Compliance with a guideline to deliver radiotherapy was 95%; with chemotherapy, 77%; and with tamoxifen, 68%. Compliance with a guideline that stated no adjuvant treatment was indicated was 99% for radiotherapy, 98% for chemotherapy, and 92% for tamoxifen. Noncompliance among patients with an indication for treatment was related to nonreferral to an oncology specialist and less complete implementation of guideline changes in the community as compared with cancer center practices.
Compliance was high, but scheduled updating and more effective community implementation could further improve consistency of care.
PubMed ID
8996145 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.