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Case management in vocational rehabilitation: a case study with promising results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174654
Source
Work. 2005;24(3):297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
John Selander
Sven-Uno Marnetoft
Author Affiliation
Centre for Studies on National Social Insurance, Department of Health Science, Mid-Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden. john.selander@mh.se
Source
Work. 2005;24(3):297-304
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Case Management
Female
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Rehabilitation, Vocational - methods
Sick Leave
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Unemployment
Abstract
The aim of the current study was to investigate whether Case Management and the strengths model could be a successful method in vocational rehabilitation of unemployed people on long term sick leave in Sweden. An additional aim was to further highlight the actual rehabilitation process.
Ten clients, five men and five women aged between 35 and 40, were included in the project. All ten were at the project start both long-term unemployed (2-13 years) and on long term sick leave (2-6 years). The project was evaluated from four perspectives: Quality of life (SF 36), sickness absence, and contact with working life were investigated before and after the project. The rehabilitation process was investigated during and after the project.
The result from the study was positive. Of the 10 clients who participated in the project, six have improved their quality of life, seven have a diminished sickness absence and seven have a closer contact to working life after the project than before. With regards to the rehabilitation process, the results here also impart a positive picture. It should be noted, however, that the study is small and not based on a random sample. The results should not be generalized, but recognized instead as a positive indication.
PubMed ID
15912019 View in PubMed
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Experiences of working from a freestanding position as a case manager when supporting clients in the Swedish welfare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279772
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2016 Jun;39(2):123-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Carolina Klockmo
Sven-Uno Marnetoft
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2016 Jun;39(2):123-9
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case Managers
Decision Making
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
National Health Programs
Professional Autonomy
Professional Role
Public Relations
Social Welfare
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish state uses a case management function known as Personligt Ombud (PO). The role as PO differs from the traditional professional roles. It has a freestanding position in the welfare system. The aim of this study was to investigate POs' experiences of working from a freestanding position when supporting clients. Telephone interviews were conducted with 22 POs across Sweden. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by latent qualitative content analysis. The findings were reflected in three categories - freedom-promoted flexibility, surfing through a complex welfare system, and working for legitimacy. POs developed a holistic view to both the client as well as to the welfare system. POs experienced solely representing the client, which is a positive feature because part of the POs' role is advocating for the clients rights. The PO service differs from the PO service from other existing case management models and may need to develop strategies for decision-making and support in their own role. For example, they may use group supervision teams or 'reflective teams'. The freestanding position may also entail problems in terms of lack of legitimacy. It is important for POs to develop good platforms with the surrounding actors among others things to improve the co-ordination process. It could be interesting if the PO model would be tested in other countries that have a fragmented welfare system. The PO model may also be useful to other 'target groups' who are in need of co-ordinated rehabilitation services.
PubMed ID
27042767 View in PubMed
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Important components to create personal working alliances with clients in the mental health sector to support the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257452
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2014 Mar;37(1):40-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Carolina Klockmo
Sven-Uno Marnetoft
John Selander
Mikael Nordenmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2014 Mar;37(1):40-7
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case Management
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient Advocacy
Power (Psychology)
Professional Role
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
Personligt ombud (PO) is a Swedish version of case management that aims to support individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Guidelines to the PO service emphasize the different role that the PO plays with respect to the relationship with clients. The aim of this study was to investigate the components that POs found to be important in the relationship with clients. Telephone interviews with 22 POs across Sweden were carried out. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The relationship with each client was described as the foundation of the POs' work; it was the only 'tool' they had. The findings were reflected in a main theme, which showed the importance of creating personal working alliances with each client where POs put the client at the center of the work and adjusted their support according to the client's needs at the time. Important components were that the PO and the client trusted each other, that the power between the PO and the client was balanced, and to be a personal support. Many of the components that POs found to be important are shown as essential in recovery-oriented services. POs followed the client in the process and remained as long as necessary and this is one way of bringing hope to the client's recovery process. However, the personal tone can be fraught with difficulties and to maintain professionalism, it is necessary to reflect, through discussions with colleagues, with the leader and in supervision.
PubMed ID
24061407 View in PubMed
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Knowledge and attitude regarding recovery among mental health practitioners in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127403
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2012 Mar;35(1):62-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Carolina Klockmo
Sven-Uno Marnetoft
Mikael Nordenmark
Rolf Dalin
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden. carolina.klockmo@miun.se
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2012 Mar;35(1):62-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the knowledge and the attitude regarding recovery among practitioners working in the Swedish mental health system, Personligt Ombud (PO), Supported Housing Team (SHT) and Psychiatric Out Patient Service (POPS), to determine whether and how knowledge and attitude regarding recovery differ between the three services. A web-based questionnaire based on the Recovery Knowledge Inventory was sent to the participants. Participant selection ensured that different parts of Sweden were represented. A multiple linear regression was used to examine the result under control of Sex, Age, Educational Level, Further Education, Relevant Work Experience and Training in Recovery. The result of the regression showed that POs had higher scores than both SHT and POPS on the subscales, even under control of other variables. The SHT differed significantly from POs on two of the subscales and POPS differed significantly from POs on all subscales. Personnel with university education, more work experience or specific training in recovery also had a higher mean score. Swedish practitioners need to learn more about certain aspects of the recovery process. The differences between the services may possibly be due to the services' organization, assignment and role. Other important aspects were the level of education and having specific training in recovery; the combination of these elements could facilitate the development of a recovery-oriented mental health system.
PubMed ID
22297904 View in PubMed
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Locus of control and regional differences in sickness absence in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70602
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):925-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2005
Author
John Selander
Sven-Uno Marnetoft
Bengt Akerström
Ragnar Asplund
Author Affiliation
Centre for Studies on National Social Insurance, Mid-Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden. john.selander@mh.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):925-8
Date
Aug-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Insurance Benefits
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Sick Leave
Sweden
Urban Population
Work - economics - psychology
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate if there are differences in locus of control (LOC), at a societal level, between two residential areas in Sweden with substantial differences in sickness absence. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to 1500 randomly selected men and women aged 20 - 64 years. Five hundred questionnaires were sent to people living in Stromsund (a sparsely populated municipality in northern Sweden with high rates of sickness absence) and 1000 questionnaires to people in the Swedish capital of Stockholm, which has a low rate of sickness absence. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A comparison of LOC in the two study areas supported our hypothesis to a certain extent, external locus being more prominent in Stromsund. When physical and mental health and income were considered, however, the differences disappeared. Consequently, this study did not support the opinion that differences in sickness absence can be explained by LOC at a societal level.
PubMed ID
16096245 View in PubMed
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Nocturia in relation to somatic health, mental health and pain in adult men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51882
Source
BJU Int. 2005 Apr;95(6):816-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Ragnar Asplund
Sven-Uno Marnetoft
John Selander
Bengt Akerström
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Stockholm, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. r.asplund@telia.com
Source
BJU Int. 2005 Apr;95(6):816-9
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave
Sweden - epidemiology
Urination Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of nocturia to somatic health, mental health and bodily pain. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A randomly selected group of men and women aged 20-64 years, living in three small municipalities in northern Sweden, or in the city of Ostersund or in Stockholm, were sent a postal questionnaire containing questions on somatic and mental health, satisfaction with life, pain, nocturnal voiding, work and sick-listing from work. RESULTS: Reports (from 1948 respondents) on poor somatic and mental health and on pain all increased in parallel with increasing frequency of nocturnal voids. In a multiple logistic regression analysis with sex, age, somatic health, mental health and bodily pain as the independent variables, significant independent correlates (odds ratios, confidence intervals) of nocturnal micturition (two or more episodes vs none or one) were: age 45-59 vs 20-44 years, 1.9 (1.3-2.7), > or =60 vs 20-44 years, 3.8 (2.4-6.0); somatic health, poor vs good, 2.3 (1.4-3.7); mental health, poor vs good, 1.9 (1.2-3.0); pain, rather mild vs very mild or none, 1.5 (1.0-2.3); rather severe vs very mild or none, 1.9 (1.1-3.2); and very severe vs very mild or none, 6.0 (2.5-14.0). Gender was deleted by the logistic model. Sick-listing for > or = 60 days during the past year was reported by 4.9%, 10.6%, 5.6% and 38.9% of the men with none, one, two or > or = three nocturnal voids, respectively, and by 10%, 12.4%, 23% and 46.7% (both P
PubMed ID
15794789 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.