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[Alcohol addiction in itself is not a reason to suspend the driving license].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104156
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 May 21-27;111(21):952-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sven Wåhlin
Sven Andréasson
Kjell Roos
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 May 21-27;111(21):952-4
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Humans
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2014 May 21-27;111(21):95424946503
PubMed ID
24946502 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and type 2 diabetes: The role of socioeconomic, lifestyle and psychosocial factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300205
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):408-416
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Emilie E Agardh
Andreas Lundin
Anton Lager
Peter Allebeck
Ilona Koupil
Sven Andreasson
Claes-Göran Östenson
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):408-416
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigate (a) alcohol consumption in association with type 2 diabetes, taking heavy episodic drinking (HED), socioeconomic, health and lifestyle, and psychosocial factors into account, and (b) whether a seemingly protective effect of moderate alcohol consumption on type 2 diabetes persists when stratified by occupational position.
This population-based longitudinal cohort study comprises 16,223 Swedes aged 18-84 years who answered questionnaires about lifestyle, including alcohol consumption in 2002, and who were followed-up for self-reported or register-based diabetes in 2003-2011. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated in a multivariable-adjusted logistic regression model for all participants and stratified by high and low occupational position. We adjusted for HED, socioeconomic (occupational position, cohabiting status and unemployment), health and lifestyle (body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, smoking, physical inactivity, poor general health, anxiety/depression and psychosocial (low job control and poor social support) characteristics one by one, and the sets of these factors.
Moderate consumption was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes after controlling for health and lifestyle (OR=0.47; 95% CI: 0.29-0.79) and psychosocial factors (OR=0.40; 95% CI: 0.22-0.79) when compared to non-drinkers. When adjusting for socioeconomic factors, there was still an inverse but non-significant association (OR=0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-1.00). In those with high occupational position, there was no significant association between moderate consumption and type 2 diabetes after adjusting for socioeconomic (OR=0.67; 95% CI: 0.3-1.52), health and lifestyle (OR=0.70; 95% CI: 0.32-1.5), and psychosocial factors (OR=0.75; 95% CI: 0.23-2.46). On the contrary, in those with low occupational position, ORs decreased from 0.55 (95% CI: 0.28-1.1) to 0.35 (95% CI: 0.15-0.82) when adjusting for psychosocial factors, a decrease that was solely due to low job control. HED did not influence any of these associations.
Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, after adjusting for HED, health and lifestyle, and psychosocial characteristics. The association was inverse but non-significant after adjusting for socioeconomic factors. When stratified by occupational position, there was an inverse association only in those with low occupational position and after adjusting for low job control.
PubMed ID
29734853 View in PubMed
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Alcohol prevention targeting licensed premises: a study of effects on violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9739
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Eva Wallin
Thor Norström
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-7
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Law Enforcement
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This research studied the effects of a community alcohol prevention program on violent crimes. Starting in 1996, a 10-year multicomponent program based on community mobilization, training in responsible beverage service for servers and stricter enforcement of existing alcohol laws has been conducted in Stockholm, Sweden. The project has been led by an action group consisting of members from the hospitality industry and the authorities. METHOD: We used a time-series quasi-experimental design that included a control area. Data on police-reported violence during the period of January 1994 to September 2000 were analyzed through ARIMA modeling. RESULTS: During the intervention period, violent crimes decreased significantly by 29% in the intervention area, controlled for the development in the control area. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention seems to have been successful in reducing violent crimes. This effect is most likely due to a combination of various policy changes initiated by the project. The findings support the notion that community action projects working on a local basis can be effective in decreasing alcohol-related problems at licensed premises.
PubMed ID
12713202 View in PubMed
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Can I have a beer, please? A study of alcohol service to young adults on licensed premises in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9322
Source
Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Eva Wallin
Sven Andreásson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Crafoords väg 6, 113 24 Stockholm, Sweden. eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
Prev Sci. 2004 Dec;5(4):221-9
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Primary Prevention - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study evaluated the effects of a community alcohol prevention program on the frequency of alcohol service to young adults at licensed premises in Stockholm, Sweden. We used a pretest (1996)-posttests (1998 and 2001) design with intervention and control areas. The multicomponent intervention combines training of serving staff in responsible beverage service, policy initiatives, and enforcement of existing alcohol regulations. Adolescents 18 years old (the legal drinking age on licensed premises in Sweden), but younger looking according to an expert panel, visited licensed premises in pairs, where each adolescent ordered a beer. At baseline in 1996, the adolescents made 600 attempts to order. At follow-up in 1998, the number of attempts to order was 252, and at the second follow-up in 2001, the adolescents made 238 attempts. We found no statistically significant differences between the intervention and control areas. Overall, the frequency of alcohol service to adolescents on licensed premises in these areas of Stockholm decreased significantly over time, from 45 to 41 and to 32%, in 1996, 1998, and 2001, respectively. The decrease in alcohol service in 2001 was statistically significant compared to the baseline in 1996. One explanation for this improvement could be more effective enforcement of existing alcohol laws in both the intervention and control areas. We also found that licensed premises that used doormen to screen potential customers were less likely to sell to minors.
PubMed ID
15566048 View in PubMed
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Cannabis, Psychosis, and Mortality: A Cohort Study of 50,373 Swedish Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282513
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 01;173(8):790-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-01-2016
Author
Edison Manrique-Garcia
Antonio Ponce de Leon
Christina Dalman
Sven Andréasson
Peter Allebeck
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 01;173(8):790-8
Date
Aug-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Abuse - mortality - psychology
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Psychotic Disorders - mortality
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Statistics as Topic
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors assessed 1) the overall risk of death among cannabis users compared with nonusers and the extent to which psychosis affects excess mortality; 2) mortality among persons with psychotic disorders and the extent to which cannabis use affects excess mortality; and 3) the interaction effect of cannabis use and diagnosis of psychotic disorders on mortality.
This was a longitudinal study of 50,373 Swedish male military conscripts (ages 18-19) who were followed in the National Cause of Death Register up to around age 60. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to assess risk of death in relation to baseline cannabis use and diagnosis of psychotic disorders.
Subjects with a baseline history of heavy cannabis use had a significantly higher risk of death (hazard ratio=1.4, 95% CI=1.1, 1.8) than those without such a history. The authors found an excess mortality among subjects with psychotic disorders, but the level did not differ between those with a history of cannabis use (ever users: hazard ratio=3.8, 95% CI=2.8, 5.0; heavy users: hazard ratio=3.8, 95% CI=2.6, 6.2) and those without such a history (hazard ratio=3.7, 95% CI=3.1, 44). No interaction was observed between cannabis use and diagnosis of psychotic disorders with regard to mortality.
The results suggest that individuals with an early history of heavy use of cannabis are at a higher risk of death than those with a history of no use of cannabis. Although the authors adjusted for several confounders at baseline, the results should be interpreted with caution because of a lack of information on confounders in the period after conscription.
PubMed ID
27102239 View in PubMed
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The "Clubs against Drugs" program in Stockholm, Sweden: two cross-sectional surveys examining drug use among staff at licensed premises.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137284
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2011;6:2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Johanna Gripenberg Abdon
Eva Wallin
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. johanna.abdon@sll.se
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2011;6:2
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Users - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Organizational Policy
Restaurants - manpower
Self Report
Social Environment
Street Drugs - classification
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study is to examine self-reported drug use among staff at licensed premises, types of drugs used, attitudes towards drugs, and observed drug use among guests. Results are presented from two measurement points (in 2001 and 2007/08). This study was carried out within the framework of the "Clubs against Drugs" program, which is a community-based multi-component intervention targeting licensed premises in Stockholm, Sweden.
Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted, the first in 2001 and the second in 2007/08. Staff at licensed premises attending server training were asked to participate in the anonymous survey. A survey was administered in a classroom setting and consisted of four sections: 1) demographics, 2) respondents' own drug use experience, 3) respondents' attitudes towards drug use, and 4) observed drug use among guests at licensed premises.
Data were collected from 446 staff in 2001 and 677 staff in 2007/08. The four most commonly used drugs among staff were cannabis, cocaine, amphetamine, and ecstasy. The highest rates of drug use were reported by staff in the two youngest age groups, i.e., those younger than 25 and those between the ages of 25 and 29. In 2007/08 staff reported significantly lower rates of drug use than staff in 2001. Last year drug use for the sample in 2007/08 was 19% compared to 27% for the 2001 sample. While drug-using staff compared to non drug-using staff reported more observations of drug use among guests, they were less inclined to intervene. Overall, staff reported restrictive attitudes towards drugs.
The prevalence of life-time and last year drug use among staff at licensed premises is high compared to the general population in Sweden. Lower rates of self-reported drug use among staff were reported in 2007/08. The results of this study highlight that staff at licensed premises represent an important target population in club drug prevention programs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21299852 View in PubMed
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Drinking less but greater harm: could polarized drinking habits explain the divergence between alcohol consumption and harms among youth?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122867
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2012 Sep-Oct;47(5):581-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mats Hallgren
Håkan Leifman
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm 171 76, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2012 Sep-Oct;47(5):581-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper describes changes in alcohol consumption among Swedish youth over the past decade with the aim of exploring the polarization hypothesis, which asserts that while a majority of young drinkers have reduced their alcohol consumption, a subgroup have increased their drinking substantially, resulting in greater harm.
We analysed repeated cross-sectional self-report data from 45,841 15-16-year olds and 40,889 18-19-year-old high-school students living in the Stockholm municipality between 2000 and 2010. The questionnaire assessed alcohol and drug use, and risk factors for alcohol misuse. Changes over time at different levels of consumption are presented by age and gender.
We find evidence of a polarization effect in youth drinking, with consumption reducing significantly over the past 10 years among all young people, except the heaviest drinkers, where consumption and binge drinking tended to increase. The dispersion in per capita consumption also increased over time, indicating more heavy drinkers. The total number of risk factors for alcohol misuse decreased among most survey participants from 2000 to 2010, but with variability between years.
Polarized drinking habits are a likely explanation for the recent divergence between per capita alcohol consumption, which has decreased, and alcohol-related hospitalizations, which have increased sharply among Swedish youth in recent years. We suggest that ongoing social changes could be affecting young people in the form of greater disparities, which are associated with a higher incidence of social problems generally, including heavy drinking.
PubMed ID
22763231 View in PubMed
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Effects on Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Related Harm of a Community-Based Prevention Intervention With National Support in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295914
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 02 23; 53(3):412-419
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-23-2018
Author
Tony Nilsson
Peter Allebeck
Håkan Leifman
Sven Andréasson
Thor Norström
Karin Guldbrandsson
Author Affiliation
a Division of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences , Karolinska Institutet , Sweden.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 02 23; 53(3):412-419
Date
02-23-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Community Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Financial Support
Harm Reduction
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
In order to strengthen local alcohol prevention work in Sweden the Swedish government has for the past almost 15 years commissioned the Public Health Agency of Sweden to initiate a series of community-based alcohol prevention projects. The latest of these, labeled local development with ambitions (LUMA), included 25 municipalities in Sweden.
Aim of this study is to examine if LUMA municipalities that received financial support, with requirements, increased local alcohol prevention and if alcohol consumption and harm declined.
Twenty-five Swedish municipalities that received financial support aiming to strengthen local alcohol preventing activities (intervention group) were compared to municipalities that did not receive such support (control group, N = 224), before, during, and after the intervention period. Two composite measures of policy and activity were created and used. The composite activity measure includes seven activity indicators and the composite policy measure includes six policy indicators. Harm measures have been selected based on several recommended indicators for monitoring alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in Sweden. A fixed effects model was used to analyze data.
The results reveal that prevention activities increased and several alcohol-related harm indicators were reduced in intervention municipalities (LUMA) compared with in control municipalities.
It seems as if financial support, combined with specific requirements and support from the regional and national level, can stimulate local alcohol prevention activities and have a significant effect on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm. Similar evaluations in other countries would be of great value for assessing the generalizability of findings.
PubMed ID
28816572 View in PubMed
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Estimating the public health impact of disbanding a government alcohol monopoly: application of new methods to the case of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298003
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 Dec 22; 18(1):1400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-22-2018
Author
Tim Stockwell
Adam Sherk
Thor Norström
Colin Angus
Mats Ramstedt
Sven Andréasson
Tanya Chikritzhs
Johanna Gripenberg
Harold Holder
John Holmes
Pia Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research (CISUR), Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 2Y2, Canada. timstock@uvic.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 Dec 22; 18(1):1400
Date
Dec-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Female
Government Regulation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Privatization
Public Policy
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Government alcohol monopolies were created in North America and Scandinavia to limit health and social problems. The Swedish monopoly, Systembolaget, reports to a health ministry and controls the sale of all alcoholic beverages with >?3.5% alcohol/volume for off-premise consumption, within a public health mandate. Elsewhere, alcohol monopolies are being dismantled with evidence of increased consumption and harms. We describe innovative modelling techniques to estimate health outcomes in scenarios involving Systembolaget being replaced by 1) privately owned liquor stores, or 2) alcohol sales in grocery stores. The methods employed can be applied in other jurisdictions and for other policy changes.
Impacts of the privatisation scenarios on pricing, outlet density, trading hours, advertising and marketing were estimated based on Swedish expert opinion and published evidence. Systematic reviews were conducted to estimate impacts on alcohol consumption in each scenario. Two methods were applied to estimate harm impacts: (i) alcohol attributable morbidity and mortality were estimated utilising the International Model of Alcohol Harms and Policies (InterMAHP); (ii) ARIMA methods to estimate the relationship between per capita alcohol consumption and specific types of alcohol-related mortality and crime.
Replacing government stores with private liquor stores (Scenario 1) led to a 20.0% (95% CI, 15.3-24.7) increase in per capita consumption. Replacement with grocery stores (Scenario 2) led to a 31.2% (25.1-37.3%) increase. With InterMAHP there were 763 or?+?47% (35-59%) and 1234 or?+?76% (60-92%) more deaths per year, for Scenarios 1 and 2 respectively. With ARIMA, there were 850 (334-1444) more deaths per year in Scenario 1 and 1418 more in Scenario 2 (543-2505). InterMAHP also estimated 10,859 or?+?29% (22-34%) and 16,118 or?+?42% (35-49%) additional hospital stays per year respectively.
There would be substantial adverse consequences for public health and safety were Systembolaget to be privatised. We demonstrate a new combined approach for estimating the impact of alcohol policies on consumption and, using two alternative methods, alcohol-attributable harm. This approach could be readily adapted to other policies and settings. We note the limitation that some significant sources of uncertainty in the estimates of harm impacts were not modelled.
PubMed ID
30577827 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a Swedish version of the Strengthening Families Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262259
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Aug;24(4):578-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Eva Skärstrand
Knut Sundell
Sven Andréasson
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Aug;24(4):578-84
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Parents - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Schools
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
Adolescents' alcohol consumption is a public health concern in Sweden as well as in many other countries. Underage drinking is associated with increased risks of alcohol-related injuries, risky sexual behaviours and dependence later in life. Different strategies have been used in the effort to prevent this behaviour, and to postpone the onset of alcohol. The Strengthening Families Programme 10-14 (SFP 10-14) from the USA has been highlighted as one of the more effective prevention programmes. The aim of the present article was to evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Swedish version of the SFP 10-14.
This was a cluster randomized controlled trial including 587 sixth-grade students (age 12) and their parents in 19 elementary schools in Stockholm. Schools were randomly assigned to either control (9 schools, 216 students) or to the family skills training intervention (10 schools, 371 students). The SFP Swedish version consisted of two parts with seven and five sessions, respectively, held separately for youths and parents except two joint family sessions. Measures of students' self-reported episodes of drunkenness, smoking, illicit drug use and other norm-breaking behaviours were collected at baseline (March 2003) and at three subsequent yearly surveys. Data were analysed using multilevel models with an intention-to-treat approach.
No preventive effects were found for smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use and other norm-breaking behaviours, nor did moderators affect the outcome.
The Swedish version of the SFP 10-14 was not effective in preventing youths' substance use in a Swedish context.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Public Health. 2014 Jun;24(3):354-524723690
PubMed ID
24078373 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.