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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with oppositional defiant disorder in Swedish children - an open study of collaborative problem solving.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126593
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Jun;101(6):624-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Mats Johnson
Sven Ostlund
Gunnar Fransson
Magnus Landgren
Salmir Nasic
Björn Kadesjö
Christopher Gillberg
Elisabeth Fernell
Author Affiliation
The Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Jun;101(6):624-30
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - complications - therapy
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - complications - therapy
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Problem Solving
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate collaborative problem solving (CPS) in Swedish 6-13-year-old children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD).
Seventeen families completed 6-10 sessions of CPS training. Primary outcome measures were SNAP-IV [attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and ODD scores] and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scores at baseline, post-intervention and 6 months later. Secondary outcome measures were the Conners' 10-item scale and the Family Burden of Illness Module (FBIM).
All 17 participants completed the intervention. The whole group had significant reductions in SNAP-IV ODD, ADHD, total Conners' and FBIM scores, both at post-intervention and at 6-month follow-up. Eight of the children, although significantly improved on ODD scores and the Conners' emotional lability subscale at post-intervention, had almost no improvement in hyperactivity/impulsivity. Post-intervention, this group received stimulant medication for their ADHD. CGI-I scores of much improved or very much improved were reached by 53% (9/17) of all at post-intervention, and by 81% (13/16) at 6-month follow-up.
Collaborative problem solving significantly reduced ODD, ADHD and emotional lability symptoms. A subgroup improved in their ADHD symptoms only after adding stimulant medication.
PubMed ID
22375727 View in PubMed
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Omega 3/6 fatty acids for reading in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 9-year-old mainstream schoolchildren in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286163
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Jan;58(1):83-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Mats Johnson
Gunnar Fransson
Sven Östlund
Björn Areskoug
Christopher Gillberg
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Jan;58(1):83-93
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy
Child
Double-Blind Method
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Reading
Sweden
Abstract
Previous research has shown positive effects of Omega 3/6 fatty acids in children with inattention and reading difficulties. We aimed to investigate if Omega 3/6 improved reading ability in mainstream schoolchildren.
We performed a 3-month parallel, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial followed by 3-month active treatment for all subjects. Mainstream schoolchildren aged 9-10 years were randomized 1:1 to receive three Omega 3/6 capsules twice daily or identical placebo. Assessments were made at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome measure was the Logos test battery for evaluating reading abilities. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02557477.
The study enrolled 154 children (active n = 78; placebo n = 76), of whom 122 completed the first 3 months (active n = 64; placebo n = 58) and 105 completed the whole study (active/active n = 55; placebo/active n = 50). Outcomes were assessed by per protocol (PP) and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses. Active treatment was superior to placebo at 3 months for improvement in phonologic decoding time (PP active/placebo difference -0.16; 95% CI -0.03, -0.29; effect size (ES) .44; p = .005; and ITT ES .37; p = .036), in visual analysis time (PP active/placebo difference -0.19; 95% CI -0.05, -0.33; ES .49; p = .013; and ITT ES .40; p = .01), and for boys in phonologic decoding time (PP -0.22; 95% CI -0.03, -0.41; ES .62; p = .004). Children with ADHD-RS scores above the median showed treatment benefits in visual analysis time (PP ES .8, p = .009), reading speed per word (PP ES .61, p = .008), and phonologic decoding time per word (PP ES .85, p = .006). Adverse events were rare and mild, mainly stomach pain/diarrhea (active n = 9, placebo n = 2).
Compared with placebo, 3 months of Omega 3/6 treatment improved reading ability - specifically the clinically relevant 'phonologic decoding time' and 'visual analysis time' - in mainstream schoolchildren. In particular, children with attention problems showed treatment benefits.
PubMed ID
27545509 View in PubMed
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