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Can a focused staff training programme improve the ward atmosphere and patient satisfaction in a forensic psychiatric hospital? A pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152962
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Mar;23(1):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Merete Berg Nesset
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Roger Almvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
St. Olav's University Hospital Trondheim, Forensic Department and Research Centre Bröset, Trondheim, Norway. merete.berg.nesset@stolav.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Mar;23(1):117-24
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Milieu Therapy
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Staff Development
Young Adult
Abstract
The main aim of the study was to describe whether staff training and lectures on milieu therapy to nursing staff can change the treatment environment, as perceived by the patients, in a desirable direction. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee for Medical Research.
To measure the patients' perceptions of the treatment environment we used the Ward Atmosphere Scale (WAS). The ward atmosphere was evaluated three times during a 12-month period. Additionally, the patients completed five questions concerning satisfaction with the treatment environment. Between the first and the second ward evaluation the nursing staff was given 3 weeks of lectures on different aspects of milieu therapy. The nursing staff completed the WAS and three satisfaction items.
The study revealed a change in desired direction after education in five of the six key subscales of the WAS (Involvement, Support, Practical orientation, Angry and aggressive behaviour and Order and organization). Staff control was the only subscale with no changes. The patients also reported an increase in satisfaction. The study revealed no major changes in the staff scores. The present study included only a small number of patients and examined the changes in only one psychiatric department; hence it could be argued that the results cannot be generalized to equivalent populations within the forensic services.
The study indicated that it is possible to improve the ward atmosphere in a desirable direction by a 3-week training programme for nursing staff about important aspects of milieu therapy.
PubMed ID
19170956 View in PubMed
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Can learning potential in schizophrenia be assessed with the standard CVLT-II? An exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158202
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anja Vaskinn
Kjetil Sundet
Svein Friis
Torill Ueland
Carmen Simonsen
Astrid B Birkenaes
John A Engh
Stein Opjordsmoen
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. anja.vaskinn@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):179-86
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aptitude
Cognition
Female
Humans
Learning
Learning Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Mental Recall
Neuropsychological Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - complications
Schizophrenic Psychology
Semantics
Social Behavior
Verbal Learning
Abstract
This study examined the potential of using the regular administration of a common neuropsychological test, the CVLT-II, to assess learning potential in schizophrenia. Based on List A trial 1 performance and the learning slope, a schizophrenia sample was divided into three learning potential groups (non-learners, learners and high-achievers) that differed in the use of learning strategies. High-achievers utilized more semantic clustering than learners and non-learners, and non-learners were less consistent in words recalled than the other two groups. This standard administration approach is a promising, time-saving alternative to the modified tests of learning potential used so far.
PubMed ID
18352988 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of adolescents subjected to restraint in acute psychiatric units in Norway: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268002
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2014 Nov 1;65(11):1367-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2014
Author
Astrid Furre
Leiv Sandvik
Sonja Heyerdahl
Svein Friis
Maria Knutzen
Ketil Hanssen-Bauer
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2014 Nov 1;65(11):1367-72
Date
Nov-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants
Family Characteristics
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Norway
Restraint, Physical
Abstract
Use of restraint in psychiatric treatment is controversial. This study compared social, mental health, and treatment characteristics of restrained and nonrestrained adolescents in acute psychiatric inpatient units.
In a retrospective case-control design, we included all adolescents restrained during 2008-2010 (N=288) in all acute psychiatric inpatient units that accepted involuntarily admitted adolescents in Norway (N=16). A control group (N=288) of nonrestrained adolescent patients was randomly selected from the same units. Restraint included mechanical restraint, pharmacological restraint, seclusion, and physical holding. Data sources were electronic patient records and restraint protocols. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to predict restraint use.
Compared with nonrestrained adolescents, restrained adolescents were more likely to be immigrants, to live in institutions or foster care, and to have had involvement with child protection services. The restrained adolescents were more likely to have psychotic, eating, or externalizing disorders and lower scores on the Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS). They had multiple admissions and longer stays and were more often involuntarily referred. When the analysis adjusted for age, gender, living arrangements, child protection services involvement, and ICD-10 diagnoses, several variables were significantly associated with restraint: immigrant background, low CGAS score, number of admissions, length of stay, and involuntary referral.
Restrained and nonrestrained patients differed significantly in social, mental health, and treatment characteristics. These findings may be useful in developing strategies for reducing the use of restraint in child and adolescent psychiatry.
PubMed ID
24980114 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257621
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;215(1):127-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2014
Author
Maria Knutzen
Stål Bjørkly
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Nina Helen Mjøsund
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Research and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, P.O.Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;215(1):127-33
Date
Jan-30-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Registries
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.
PubMed ID
24230996 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of psychiatric inpatients who experienced restraint and those who did not: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134890
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 May;62(5):492-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Maria Knutzen
Nina H Mjosund
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Education, Oslo University Hospital,Oslo, Norway. maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 May;62(5):492-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Regression Analysis
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Use of restraint in acute psychiatric wards is highly controversial. Knowledge is limited about the characteristics of patients who are restrained and the predictors of use of restraint. This study examined whether restrained patients differed from nonrestrained patients in demographic, clinical, and medicolegal variables and to what extent the variables predicted use of restraint.
A two-year retrospective case-control design was used. The sample comprised all restrained patients (N=375) and a randomly selected control group of nonrestrained patients (N=374) from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards in Norway. Data sources were restraint protocols and electronic patient files.
The restrained patients were significantly younger and more likely to be men, to reside outside the wards' catchment areas, and to have an immigrant background. Restrained patients also had more admissions and longer inpatient stays than nonrestrained patients and were more likely to be involuntarily referred and to have one or more of the following ICD-10 diagnoses: a substance use disorder, schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder, and bipolar disorder. Binary logistic regression analyses, adjusting for age, gender, immigrant background, and catchment area, indicated that the number of admissions, length of stay, legal basis for referral, and diagnosis each independently predicted the use of restraint. No interactions were found.
Use of restraint was predicted by multiple admissions, long inpatient stays, involuntary admission, and serious mental illness. Identifying patients at risk may inform the development of alternatives to restraint for these patients.
PubMed ID
21532074 View in PubMed
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[Compulsory admissions for observation in emergency psychiatric departments--discharge next day?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185477
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Apr 3;123(7):917-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2003

Co-Occurrence of ODD and CD in Preschool Children With Symptoms of ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289854
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Jul; 21(9):741-752
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Bothild Bendiksen
Elisabeth Svensson
Heidi Aase
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Svein Friis
Anne M Myhre
Pål Zeiner
Author Affiliation
1 Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
Source
J Atten Disord. 2017 Jul; 21(9):741-752
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
Patterns of co-occurrence between ADHD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and Conduct Disorder (CD) were examined in a sample of non-referred preschool children. ADHD subtypes and sex differences were also explored.
Children aged 3.5 years ( n = 1,048) with high scores on ADHD characteristics were recruited from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and clinically assessed, including a semi-structured psychiatric interview.
In children with ADHD, concurrent ODD was present more often than CD (31% vs. 10%), but having ADHD gave higher increase in the odds of CD than of ODD (ODD: odds ratio [OR] = 6.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [4.2, 10.8]; CD: OR = 17.6, 95% CI = [5.9, 52.9]). We found a greater proportion of children having the combined ADHD subtype as well as more severe inattentiveness among children with co-occurring CD compared with ODD. Sex differences were minor.
There are important differences in co-occurring patterns of ODD and CD in preschool children with ADHD.
PubMed ID
24994876 View in PubMed
Less detail

Day treatment of patients with personality disorders: experiences from a Norwegian treatment research network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71305
Source
J Personal Disord. 2003 Jun;17(3):243-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Sigmund Karterud
Geir Pedersen
Elin Bjordal
Jørgen Brabrand
Svein Friis
Oyvind Haaseth
Grete Haavaldsen
Torill Irion
Harald Leirvåg
Elin Tørum
Oyvind Urnes
Author Affiliation
Department for Personality Psychiatry, Psychiatric Division, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sigmund.karterud@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
J Personal Disord. 2003 Jun;17(3):243-62
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Borderline Personality Disorder - therapy
Cognitive Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Paranoid Personality Disorder - therapy
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study sought to investigate the following research questions: Are time-limited day treatment programs for patients with personality disorder (PD) effective outside resourceful university settings, and what are the overall treatment results when the program is implemented on a larger scale? Do all categories and subtypes of PDs respond favorably to such treatment? How intensive should such day treatment programs be? All patients (n = 1,244) were consecutively admitted to eight different treatment programs in the Norwegian Network of Psychotherapeutic Day Hospitals from 1993 to 2000. Altogether, 1,010 patients were diagnosed with PD. Avoidant, borderline, not otherwise specified (NOS), and paranoid PD were the most common conditions. SCID-II and MINI were used as diagnostic instruments. Outcome measures included GAF Global Assessment of Functioning, (GAF; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), SCL-90R, CIP, Quality of Life, work functioning and parasuicidal behavior, measured at admittance, discharge and 1-year follow up. The attrition rate was 24%. The number of dropouts did not improve over time. As a group, completers with PD improved significantly on all outcome variables from admittance to discharge and improvement was maintained or increased at follow up. Treatment results were best for borderline PD, cluster C patients, PD NOS and No PD, and poorer for cluster A patients. Units with a high treatment dosage did not experience better outcomes than those with a low treatment dosage (10 hours per week). Results from the University unit were not better than those from units at local hospitals or mental health centers.
PubMed ID
12839103 View in PubMed
Less detail

Delusions are associated with poor cognitive insight in schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152910
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2010 Jul;36(4):830-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
John A Engh
Svein Friis
Astrid B Birkenaes
Halldóra Jónsdóttir
Ole Klungsøyr
Petter A Ringen
Carmen Simonsen
Anja Vaskinn
Stein Opjordsmoen
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Section of Psychosis Research, Division of Psychiatry, Ulleval University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. john.engh@medisin.uio.no
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2010 Jul;36(4):830-5
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Hallucinations - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis
Schizophrenic Psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between the symptoms delusions and hallucinations measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and cognitive insight as assessed with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) in patients with schizophrenia. The BCIS is based on 2 subscales, self-reflectiveness and self-certainty, measuring objectivity, reflectiveness and openness to feedback, and mental flexibility. Overall cognitive insight was defined as the difference between self-reflectiveness and self-certainty. This cross-sectional study of 143 patients showed that the occurrence of delusions is associated with low self-reflectiveness and high self-certainty, reflecting low cognitive insight. Hallucinations in the absence of delusions were associated with high self-reflectiveness and low self-certainty, possibly reflecting more open-mindedness and higher cognitive insight. The present findings suggest that delusions are associated with low cognitive insight, whereas solitary hallucinations may be associated with high cognitive insight.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19176474 View in PubMed
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Development of the movement domain in the global body examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133635
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Jan;28(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Alice Kvåle
Berit Heir Bunkan
Stein Opjordsmoen
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Section for Physiotherapy Science, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. alice.kvale@isf.uib.no
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Jan;28(1):41-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomechanical Phenomena
Discriminant Analysis
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Norway
Pain - diagnosis - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Physical Examination - methods
Physical Therapy Modalities
Predictive value of tests
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to develop a new Movement domain, based on 16 items from the Global Physiotherapy Examination-52 (GPE-52) and 18 items from the Comprehensive Body Examination (CBE). Furthermore, we examined how well the new domain and its scales would discriminate between healthy individuals and different groups of patients, compared to the original methods. Two physiotherapists, each using one method, independently examined 132 individuals (34 healthy, 32 with localized pain, 32 with generalized pain, and 34 with psychoses). The number of items was reduced by means of correlational and exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency was examined with Cronbach's alpha. For examination of discriminative validity, Mann-Whitney U-test and Area under the Curve (AUC) were used. The initial 34 items were reduced to two subscales with 13 items: one for range of movement and balance and one for flexibility. Cronbach's alpha was 0.84 and 0.87 for the two subscales. The new subscales showed very good to excellent discriminating ability between healthy persons and the different patient groups (p
PubMed ID
21682584 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.