Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Influencing factors of children's fruit, vegetable and sugar-enriched food intake in a Finnish preschool setting - Preschool personnel's perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287719
Source
Appetite. 2016 Aug 01;103:72-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-01-2016
Author
Carola Ray
Suvi Määttä
Reetta Lehto
Gun Roos
Eva Roos
Source
Appetite. 2016 Aug 01;103:72-79
Date
Aug-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Behavior - ethnology
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Dietary Sugars - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Food Services - standards
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Local Government
Male
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Peer Influence
Professional Role
School Nursing - manpower
School Teachers
Schools, Nursery - manpower - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
A large proportion of young children spend most of their weekdays at preschool in Western countries. In Finland, three meals are included in a full day at preschool. These meals have the potential to promote healthy eating. This study aimed to obtain the personnel's (preschool teachers, day-care nurses) views on the factors influencing children's fruit, vegetable, and sugar-enriched food intake at preschool.
Four focus groups, in all 14 preschool personnel. Two researchers independently analysed the data using a socio-ecological framework.
At the child level, age, peers, and the child's personality were recognized as factors influencing the fruit and vegetable (FV) and sugar-enriched food intake. At the preschool level, both the physical and social environments were discussed thoroughly, whereas at the societal level, policies of the EU, the state, and the municipality were mentioned as factors that influence what children eat in preschool. The personnel also discussed the interactions between factors both between levels and within levels.
In Finnish preschools, children's food intake is influenced on and within several levels of the socio-ecological model. The identification of the factors influencing food intake allows different methods of intervention at multiple levels to promote healthy eating behaviours in preschools.
PubMed ID
27020091 View in PubMed
Less detail

Preschool children's context-specific sedentary behaviours and parental socioeconomic status in Finland: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293046
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Nov 03; 7(11):e016690
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-03-2017
Author
Suvi Määttä
Hanna Konttinen
Ari Haukkala
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Eva Roos
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Nov 03; 7(11):e016690
Date
Nov-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Sedentary lifestyle
Social Class
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the associations of parental socioeconomic status (SES) with preschoolers' objectively measured sedentary time (SED) over the course of a week and with parent-reported children's screen and reading times at home as indicators of sedentary behaviours (SB).
Cross-sectional.
In years 2015 and 2016 in Finland.
864 children, aged 3-6 years, with their parents.
Children's accelerometer data were transformed into average SED minutes per hour in different contexts (preschool, home during preschool days, weekend and total). Parent-reported children's screen and reading times were expressed as average daily minutes. The SES indicators (maternal and paternal education and relative household income) were grouped into three categories. Linear or logistic regression analyses were used, with municipality, season, and children's gender and age as covariates. CIs were adjusted for clustering at the preschool group level.
Children with low maternal (ß=17.21, 95%?CI: 8.71 to 25.71) and paternal (ß=10.54, 95%?CI: 0.77 to 20.30) education had more overall screen time at home than their more advantaged counterparts. SES differences in overall screen time were mostly explained by TV viewing. Children with low as opposed to high maternal education (ß=-2.66, 95%?CI: -4.95 to -0.38) had less reading time at home. Children whose fathers were on the middle (ß=-1.15, 95%?CI: -2.01 to -0.29) educational level had less weekend SED than those with high paternal education. Otherwise, parental SES was not related to objectively measured SED.
The results of this study highlight the fact that the associations between parental SES and preschoolers' SB are dependent on the indicators of SES and SBs, and vary between different contexts. Generally, parental SES was not associated with SED, whereas some SES differences existed in screen time and reading time at home. Interventions aiming to diminish SES differences in children's SB should focus on home hours.
ISRCTN57165350.
Notes
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2013 Jan;17(1):56-61 PMID 22370905
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Jun 24;8(6):e67206 PMID 23826236
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Oct;29(3):171-8 PMID 16168865
Cites: Obes Rev. 2016 Sep;17 (9):833-49 PMID 27256486
Cites: Child Obes. 2013 Aug;9 Suppl:S51-72 PMID 23944925
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60619 PMID 23573273
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 May;8(3):197-209 PMID 17444962
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2006;15 Suppl:15-20 PMID 16928657
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2016;67:339-61 PMID 26253542
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Feb 19;9:15 PMID 22340137
Cites: Pediatrics. 2014 Apr;133(4):e843-9 PMID 24616357
Cites: Sports Med. 2017 Jan;47(1):61-75 PMID 27260683
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2012 Aug;43(2):150-8 PMID 22813679
Cites: Curr Obes Rep. 2015 Sep;4(3):350-62 PMID 26627493
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Nov 11;8(11):e79124 PMID 24244433
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2008 Dec 11;5:66 PMID 19077255
Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Apr 24;3(4):null PMID 23619088
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 04;16:718 PMID 27492488
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2010 Apr;25(2):199-210 PMID 18502732
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Mar;10(3):150-7 PMID 11886937
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014 Jan 09;11:1 PMID 24405936
Cites: Obes Rev. 2012 Mar;13 Suppl 1:75-84 PMID 22309066
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010 Sep 08;7:66 PMID 20825682
Cites: Prev Med. 2012 Sep;55(3):201-5 PMID 22766008
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Mar 01;16:201 PMID 26932822
Cites: Adv Life Course Res. 2014 Jun;20:56-59 PMID 25431546
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014 May 17;11:65 PMID 24886305
Cites: Prev Med. 2015 Sep;78:115-22 PMID 26212631
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2013 Jun;44(6):651-8 PMID 23683983
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Jun;37(3):540-2 PMID 22540258
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 Jan;135(1):1-3 PMID 25548323
Cites: Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2010 Aug;22(3):408-20 PMID 20814036
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2015 Apr;18(5):860-8 PMID 24887315
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Dec 02;15:1203 PMID 26630926
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Nov;14(11):2000-6 PMID 17135617
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Jul;51(1):3-10 PMID 20417227
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Mar 18;10(3):e0118303 PMID 25785738
Cites: Prev Med. 2012 Oct;55(4):325-9 PMID 22890021
Cites: Prev Med Rep. 2017 Apr 25;6:339-345 PMID 28480158
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Jul 26;9:88 PMID 22835155
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Aug;37(4):753-72 PMID 22765839
Cites: Paediatr Child Health. 2013 Jan;18(1):25-8 PMID 24381488
Cites: Prev Med. 2014 May;62:182-92 PMID 24534461
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Jul;20(7):1338-54 PMID 22222926
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2016 Jun 28;13:69 PMID 27350043
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2016 Nov;31(11):2032-2040 PMID 27378122
Cites: Obes Rev. 2016 Apr;17 (4):330-44 PMID 26914664
Cites: BMC Obes. 2016 Jul 13;3:34 PMID 27437117
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Aug 21;9(8):e105620 PMID 25144686
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Nov;51(5):345-51 PMID 20682330
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Aug;29(2):120-5 PMID 16005808
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Dec;44(12):2436-41 PMID 22776873
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jul;43(7):1360-8 PMID 21131873
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2016 Aug 22;13:93 PMID 27549588
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013 Sep 04;10:105 PMID 24007492
Cites: Diabetologia. 2012 Nov;55(11):2895-905 PMID 22890825
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Oct 20;12(10):13148-61 PMID 26492261
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Apr 18;15:402 PMID 25927298
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2008 Dec;26(14):1557-65 PMID 18949660
PubMed ID
29101133 View in PubMed
Less detail

The PRO GREENS intervention in Finnish schoolchildren - the degree of implementation affects both mediators and the intake of fruits and vegetables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258776
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1185-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2014
Author
Reetta Lehto
Suvi Määttä
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Saskia Te Velde
Nanna Lien
Inga Thorsdottir
Agneta Yngve
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1185-94
Date
Oct-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet
Europe
Faculty
Female
Finland
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Plan Implementation
Health promotion
Humans
Male
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Snacks
Students
Vegetables
Abstract
Little is known about the mediating effects of the determinants of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in school-based interventions that promote FV intake, and few studies have examined the impact of the degree of implementation on the effects of an intervention. The present study examined whether the degree of implementation of an intervention had an effect on children's fruit or vegetable intake and determined possible mediators of this effect. The study is part of the European PRO GREENS intervention study which aimed to develop effective strategies to promote consumption of fruit and vegetables in schoolchildren across Europe. Data from 727 Finnish children aged 11 years were used. The baseline study was conducted in spring 2009 and the follow-up study 12 months later. The intervention was conducted during the school year 2009-2010. The effects were examined using multilevel mediation analyses. A high degree of implementation of the intervention had an effect on children's fruit intake. Knowledge of recommendations for FV intake and liking mediated the association between a high degree of implementation of the intervention and an increase in the frequency of fruit intake. Knowledge of recommendations for FV intake and bringing fruits to school as a snack mediated the association between a low degree of implementation of the intervention and an increase in the frequency of fruit intake. Overall, the model accounted for 34 % of the variance in the change in fruit intake frequency. Knowledge of recommendations acted as a mediator between the degree of implementation of the intervention and the change in vegetable intake frequency. In conclusion, the degree of implementation had an effect on fruit intake, and thus in future intervention studies the actual degree of implementation of interventions should be assessed when considering the effects of interventions.
PubMed ID
25106046 View in PubMed
Less detail