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Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk of heart failure in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278386
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2016 Mar;18(3):253-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Thanasis G Tektonidis
Agneta Åkesson
Bruna Gigante
Alicja Wolk
Susanna C Larsson
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2016 Mar;18(3):253-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet, Mediterranean
Heart Failure - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Registries
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined the hypothesis that high adherence to a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of developing heart failure (HF) as well as the risk of death from HF.
The study population comprised 37 308 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men who were free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. The modified Mediterranean diet (mMED) score was created from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire, based on consumption of presumed beneficial/detrimental foods, on a 0-8 scale. Incident HF events were ascertained by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and the Cause of Death Registers. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression models. We identified 146 deaths from HF and 1269 incident HF events over a median follow-up of 10.9 years (1998-2008). The mMED score was inversely associated with risk of HF (multivariable RR for the highest vs. lowest quartile 0.69, 95% CI 0.57, 0.83); the corresponding RR of HF mortality was 0.55 (95% CI 0.31, 0.98). The multivariable RR for every two-point increment in the mMED score was 0.85 (95% CI 0.78, 0.91) for incidence of HF and 0.78 (95% CI 0.62, 0.98) for mortality from HF, respectively.
High adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower risk of HF and mortality from HF in men. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings in other populations.
PubMed ID
26781788 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation: a prospective study and dose-response meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256460
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2014
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Nikola Drca
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: susanna.larsson@ki.se.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):281-9
Date
Jul-22-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although high alcohol consumption has been associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), the role of light to moderate drinking remains unclear.
The study sought to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and AF risk in a prospective study of Swedish men and women and to conduct a meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize available evidence.
We followed 79,019 men and women who, at baseline, were free from AF and had completed a questionnaire about alcohol consumption and other risk factors for chronic diseases. Incident AF cases were ascertained by linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register. For the meta-analysis, studies were identified by searching PubMed through January 10, 2014, and by reviewing references of pertinent publications. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) were combined using a random effects model.
Over 859,420 person-years of follow-up (1998 to 2009), 7,245 incident AF cases were identified in our own cohort study. The association between alcohol consumption and AF did not differ by sex (p for interaction = 0.74). Compared with current drinkers of 21 drinks/week. Results were similar after excluding binge drinkers. In a meta-analysis of 7 prospective studies, including 12,554 AF cases, the RRs were 1.08 (95% CI: 1.06 to 1.10) for 1 drink/day, 1.17 (95% CI: 1.13 to 1.21) for 2 drinks/day, 1.26 (95% CI: 1.19 to 1.33) for 3 drinks/day, 1.36 (95% CI: 1.27 to 1.46) for 4 drinks/day, and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.34 to 1.61) for 5 drinks/day, compared with nondrinkers.
These findings indicate that alcohol consumption, even at moderate intakes, is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):290-225034066
PubMed ID
25034065 View in PubMed
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Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118747
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Emma Patterson
Susanna C Larsson
Alicja Wolk
Agneta Åkesson
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. emma.patterson@ki.se
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):74-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butter - adverse effects
Cheese - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The relation between dairy foods, particularly specific foods, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. We examined the association between total, as well as specific, dairy food intakes and incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population-based cohort. We followed 33,636 women (aged 48-83 y), free from CVD, cancer, and diabetes at baseline (1997), in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Consumption of milk, cultured milk/yogurt, cheese, cream, crème fraiche, and butter was obtained from a validated self-administered FFQ at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusted for relevant CVD risk factors. MI incidence was ascertained from national registries. Over 11.6 y of follow-up, we ascertained 1392 cases of MI. When the highest quintile was compared with the lowest quintile, total dairy food intake was inversely associated with MI risk [multivariable adjusted HR: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95)]. Among specific dairy food products, total cheese was inversely associated [HR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.91)] and butter used on bread but not on cooking was positively associated [HR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75)] with MI risk. Other specific dairy food products were not significantly associated with MI risk. No differences were observed between consumption of specific low-fat and high-fat dairy foods, expressed as either absolute intakes or intakes relative to the total, and MI risk. Failure to consider dairy foods as a heterogeneous group in future studies could hamper important insights of relevance for the development of dietary guidelines.
PubMed ID
23173172 View in PubMed
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Association of diet with serum insulin-like growth factor I in middle-aged and elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9226
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 May;81(5):1163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Katarina Wolk
Kerstin Brismar
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine and Molecular Medicine, Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@imm.ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 May;81(5):1163-7
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Diet
Diet Surveys
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been implicated in several chronic diseases, including cancer, heart disease, and osteoporosis. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess whether intakes of total energy, alcohol, vitamins, minerals, and foods rich in protein and minerals (including red meat, fish and seafood, poultry, and milk) are associated with serum IGF-I concentrations in middle-aged and elderly men. DESIGN: We measured serum IGF-I concentrations in 226 free-living healthy men aged 42-76 y. The average of fourteen 24-h dietary telephone interviews performed over 1 y was used to estimate long-term dietary intake. RESULTS: We observed statistically significant positive associations between intakes of protein (P for trend = 0.001) and zinc (P for trend = 0.002) and serum IGF-I concentrations after adjusting for age. The difference in mean IGF-I concentrations for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of intake was approximately 17% (162 microg/L compared with 139 microg/L) for protein and approximately 16% (166 microg/L compared with 143 microg/L) for zinc. Consumption of red meat (P for trend = 0.05) and fish and seafood (P for trend = 0.07) was modestly positively associated with IGF-I concentrations. Other dietary factors were not associated with IGF-I concentrations. CONCLUSION: In this population of healthy well-nourished men, greater dietary intakes of protein, zinc, red meat, and fish and seafood were associated with higher IGF-I concentrations.
PubMed ID
15883443 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation is associated with different levels of physical activity levels at different ages in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103073
Source
Heart. 2014 Jul;100(13):1037-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Nikola Drca
Alicja Wolk
Mats Jensen-Urstad
Susanna C Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology at the Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2014 Jul;100(13):1037-42
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Bicycling
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Exercise
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Walking
Abstract
This study examines the influence of physical activity at different ages and of different types, on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) in a large cohort of Swedish men.
Information about physical activity was obtained from 44 410 AF-free men, aged 45-79 years (mean age=60), who had completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline in 1997. Participants reported retrospectively their time spent on leisure-time exercise and on walking or bicycling throughout their lifetime (at 15, 30 and 50 years of age, and at baseline (mean age=60)). Participants were followed-up in the Swedish National Inpatient Register for ascertainment of AF. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% CIs, adjusted for potential confounders.
During a median follow-up of 12 years, 4568 cases of AF were diagnosed. We observed a RR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36) of developing AF in men who at the age of 30 years had exercised for >5 h/week compared with 5 h/week at age 30 and quit exercising later in life (1 h/day vs almost never) and the association was similar after excluding men with previous coronary heart disease or heart failure at baseline (corresponding RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.998).
Leisure-time exercise at younger age is associated with an increased risk of AF, whereas walking/bicycling at older age is associated with a decreased risk.
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 2014 Jul;100(13):999-100024829372
PubMed ID
24829373 View in PubMed
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Black tea consumption and risk of stroke in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117466
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Mar;23(3):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. Susanna.Larsson@ki.se
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Mar;23(3):157-60
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Tea
Abstract
Our aim was examine the association between black tea consumption and risk of total stroke and stroke types in a prospective study.
A total of 74,961 Swedish women and men who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline in 1997 were followed up through December 2008. Tea consumption was assessed with a questionnaire at baseline. Stroke cases were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.
During a mean follow-up of 10.2 years, we ascertained 4089 cases of first stroke, including 3159 cerebral infarctions, 435 intracerebral hemorrhages, 148 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 347 unspecified strokes. After adjustment for other risk factors, high tea consumption was associated with a significantly lower risk of total stroke; however, there was no dose-response relation (P for trend = .36). Compared with no tea consumption, the multivariable relative risk for four or more cups per day (median, 5) was 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.998). The corresponding relative risks were 0.80 (95% CI, 0.61-1.04) for cerebral infarction and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.35-1.30) for hemorrhagic stroke.
These findings suggest that daily consumption of four or more cups of black tea is inversely associated with risk of stroke.
PubMed ID
23295000 View in PubMed
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Calcium and dairy food intakes are inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in the Cohort of Swedish Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16431
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar;83(3):667-73; quiz 728-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Leif Bergkvist
Jörgen Rutegård
Edward Giovannucci
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar;83(3):667-73; quiz 728-9
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anticarcinogenic Agents - administration & dosage
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dairy Products
Diet
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiologic studies have generally reported a modest inverse association between calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, findings pertaining to specific subsites in the colorectum have been conflicting. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to prospectively examine the relations between intakes of calcium and dairy foods and the risk of colorectal cancer, overall and by anatomic subsite, in men from the Cohort of Swedish Men. DESIGN: In 1997, 45 306 men aged 45-79 y and without a history of cancer completed a food-frequency questionnaire. The men were followed through 31 December 2004. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 6.7 y, we ascertained 449 incident cases of colorectal cancer. After adjustment for age and other known or potential risk factors, the multivariate rate ratio (RR) of colorectal cancer for men in the highest quartile of total calcium intake compared with those in the lowest quartile was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P for trend = 0.01). A high consumption of dairy foods was also associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer. The multivariate RR of colorectal cancer for > or = 7 servings/d of total dairy foods compared with
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar;83(3):527-816522897
PubMed ID
16522915 View in PubMed
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Chocolate consumption and risk of myocardial infarction: a prospective study and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284049
Source
Heart. 2016 Jul 01;102(13):1017-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2016
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Agneta Åkesson
Bruna Gigante
Alicja Wolk
Source
Heart. 2016 Jul 01;102(13):1017-22
Date
Jul-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chocolate - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine whether chocolate consumption is associated with a reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease, we used data from a prospective study of Swedish adults and we performed a meta-analysis of available prospective data.
The Swedish prospective study included 67 640 women and men from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort who had completed a food-frequency questionnaire and were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Myocardial infarction (MI) cases were ascertained through linkage with the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched from inception until 4 February 2016 to identify prospective studies on chocolate consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease.
The results from eligible studies were combined using a random-effects model. During follow-up (1998-2010), 4417 MI cases were ascertained in the Swedish study. Chocolate consumption was inversely associated with MI risk. Compared with non-consumers, the multivariable relative risk for those who consumed =3-4 servings/week of chocolate was 0.87 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.98; p for trend =0.04). Five prospective studies on chocolate consumption and ischaemic heart disease were identified. Together with the Swedish study, the meta-analysis included six studies with a total of 6851 ischaemic heart disease cases. The overall relative risk for the highest versus lowest category of chocolate consumption was 0.90 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.97), with little heterogeneity among studies (I(2)=24.3%).
Chocolate consumption is associated with lower risk of MI and ischaemic heart disease.
PubMed ID
26936339 View in PubMed
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Coffee and black tea consumption and risk of breast cancer by estrogen and progesterone receptor status in a Swedish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149686
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Dec;20(10):2039-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Leif Bergkvist
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Box 210, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Dec;20(10):2039-44
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Beverages
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Carcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Drinking Behavior - physiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Receptors, Progesterone - metabolism
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tea
Abstract
Coffee and tea consumption has been inconsistently associated with the risk of breast cancer. We examined the associations of caffeinated coffee and black tea consumption with the incidence of breast cancer, overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.
We prospectively followed up 61,433 women who were cancer free at baseline in 1987-1990. Coffee and tea consumption was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire administered at baseline and in 1997. Incident invasive breast cancer cases were ascertained by linkage with Swedish Cancer registers.
Over a mean follow-up of 17.4 years, through December 2007, there were 2,952 incident cases of invasive breast cancer identified. Coffee consumption was not associated with risk of overall breast cancer (multivariate relative risk (RR) for = 4 cups/day versus
PubMed ID
19597749 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.