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A comparison of antidepressant use in Nova Scotia, Canada and Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159450
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2008 Jul;17(7):697-706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alesha J Smith
Ingrid Sketris
Charmaine Cooke
David Gardner
Steve Kisely
Susan E Tett
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. asmith@pharmacy.uq.edu.au
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2008 Jul;17(7):697-706
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Australia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Paroxetine - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Prevalence
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sertraline - therapeutic use
Abstract
The prevalence of major depression is reported as approximately 8% in Canada and 7.5% in Australia, the use of antidepressants is therefore common. However, questions remain about whether depression is under-diagnosed and whether patients are appropriately treated with antidepressants once the disorder is recognized. We compared the use of antidepressant medicines, in Nova Scotia, Canada and Australia, in populations receiving public drug subsidy.
The Nova Scotia Pharmacare Program and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in Australia were used to obtain dispensing data for all publicly subsidized antidepressants. Utilization was compared from 2000-2003, using the World Health Organisation Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)/Defined Daily Dose (DDD) system.
The use of antidepressants increased in both areas over the study period. However, the use of antidepressants in Nova Scotia increased at a significantly higher rate than Australia. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in both areas, constituting 60% of all antidepressants prescribed. Eight different antidepressants made up 90% of the antidepressant drug use in Australia, with sertraline the most commonly prescribed. Similarly, nine different antidepressants made up 90% of the antidepressant use in Nova Scotia, with paroxetine most commonly prescribed.
This study found differences in the rate but not class of antidepressant prescribing in Nova Scotia and Australia. Antidepressant use increased in both areas over the time period. This may be due to increased exposure to marketing, promotion, education or different prescribing practices in Nova Scotia compared to Australia.
PubMed ID
18181227 View in PubMed
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A comparison of benzodiazepine and related drug use in Nova Scotia and Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155126
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;53(8):545-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Alesha J Smith
Ingrid Sketris
Charmaine Cooke
David Gardner
Steve Kisely
Susan E Tett
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. asmith@pharmacy.uq.edu.au
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;53(8):545-52
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Australia - epidemiology
Benzodiazepines
Drug Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns - legislation & jurisprudence
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Benzodiazepines can be a problem if used for long periods, or in at-risk populations, such as the elderly. We compared the use of benzodiazepine and related prescription medicines in Nova Scotia and Australia.
The Nova Scotia Pharmacare Program and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in Australia were used to obtain dispensing data in comparable populations for all publicly subsidized benzodiazepines and related compounds. Usage was compared from 2000 to 2003, using the World Health Organization anatomical therapeutic chemical and defined daily dosage (DDD) system. We also determined differences in the types of benzodiazepines prescribed.
The use of benzodiazepines increased at a steady but comparable rate in both areas. However, the use of benzodiazepines in Nova Scotia was more than double that of Australia in 2000 (123 and 48 DDD/1000 beneficiaries per day, respectively) through 2003 (138 and 57 DDD/1000 beneficiaries per day, respectively). Eight different benzodiazepines made up 90% of the drug use in Nova Scotia by contrast to only 4 different benzodiazepines in Australia.
Large differences exist between the type and rate of benzodiazepine prescribing in Nova Scotia and Australia, with Nova Scotia reporting more than twice as much use. Benzodiazepine use in both jurisdictions is increasing. The Canadian findings are especially concerning as benzodiazepine use in the Atlantic provinces has been reported to be less than other provinces. The variations between the 2 jurisdictions may be due to factors such as fewer benzodiazepines available in Australia, differences in prescriber, patient attitudes and behaviours, or different initiatives to influence benzodiazepine use.
PubMed ID
18801216 View in PubMed
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Differences in utilisation of gastroprotective drugs between 2001 and 2005 in Australia and Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114964
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;22(7):735-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Susan E Tett
Ingrid Sketris
Charmaine Cooke
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Nadia Barozzi
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;22(7):735-43
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Australia
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Mining
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - trends
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Nova Scotia
Pharmacoepidemiology
Pharmacovigilance
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Social Security
Time Factors
Abstract
This study aimed to compare use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), 2001-2005, in the elderly and social security beneficiaries in Australia (AUS) and Nova Scotia, Canada (NS).
Prescription dispensing data were collected for all subsidised H2RAs and PPIs. In AUS, dispensing data for concession beneficiaries were obtained from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme database. In NS, data were sourced from the Pharmacare database. Relevant population data were used to convert to World Health Organisation Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical defined daily doses (2005) per 1000 beneficiaries per day (DDD/1000/day).
Overall use of gastroprotective agents was similar and rising in NS and AUS (100-160?DDD/1000/day) over this 5-year time window. However, the proportion of this use accounted for by PPIs was far higher in AUS (over 85% by 2005) than in NS (23% rising to 35% over the 5?years). In AUS, PPI use rose from 50 to about 140?DDD/1000/day over the 5?years, whereas PPI use in NS rose slowly to less than 60?DDD/1000/day by 2005. H2RA use in NS was always high (over 100?DDD/1000/day), whereas in AUS, H2RA use fell from 54 to around 24?DDD/1000/day over this period.
AUS had much higher use of PPIs than NS over 2001-2005. The proportion of PPIs in all gastroprotective agents rose in AUS to be nearly 90%. The differences in utilisation during this time window could lead to differences in health outcomes from either lower gastro-intestinal bleeding risk or higher long-term adverse effects of PPIs.
PubMed ID
23559528 View in PubMed
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Multinational Evaluation of Mycophenolic Acid, Tacrolimus, Cyclosporin, Sirolimus, and Everolimus Utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276769
Source
Ann Transplant. 2016 Jan 05;21:1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-05-2016
Author
Kyle M Gardiner
Susan E Tett
Christine E Staatz
Source
Ann Transplant. 2016 Jan 05;21:1-11
Date
Jan-05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Cyclosporine - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Databases, Factual - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Denmark - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Drug Utilization - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Everolimus - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Health Expenditures - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics -economics
Humans - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Immunosuppressive Agents - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Kidney Transplantation - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Mycophenolic Acid - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Netherlands - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Norway - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Organ Transplantation - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics- economics
Registries - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Sirolimus - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Sweden - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Tacrolimus - economics - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends - economics - economics
Abstract
Increasing immunosuppressant utilization and expenditure is a worldwide challenge as more people successfully live with transplanted organs. Our aims were to characterize utilization of mycophenolate, tacrolimus, cyclosporin, sirolimus, and everolimus in Australian transplant recipients from 2007 to 2013; to identify specific patterns of usage; and to compare Australian utilization with Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, and the Netherlands use.
Australian utilization and expenditure data were captured through national Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and Highly Specialized Drug administrative databases. Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, and the Netherlands utilization were retrieved from their healthcare databases. Utilization was compared as defined daily dose per 1000 population per day (DDD/1000 population/day). Data on kidney transplant recipients, the predominant patient group prescribed these medicines, were obtained from international transplant registries.
From 2007-2013 Australian utilization of mycophenolic acid, tacrolimus and everolimus increased 2.7-fold, 2.2-fold, and 2.3-fold, respectively. Use of cyclosporin and sirolimus decreased 20% and 30%, respectively. Australian utilization was significantly lower than European utilization (2013) but was increasing at a faster rate. Total Australian expenditure increased approximately AUD$30 million over the study period to almost AUD$100 million in 2013. Kidney transplantation rates increased across each country over this time, with Australia having the lowest rate.
Immunosuppressant usage and subsequent expenditure are rising in Australia and Northern Europe. With increased numbers of people living with transplants, and the observed growth potential predicted from Northern European data, this class of medicines can be expected to continue consuming an increasing share of Australian pharmaceutical expenditure into the future.
PubMed ID
26729299 View in PubMed
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Population pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid during the first week after renal transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173599
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Aug;61(7):507-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Christine E Staatz
Stephen B Duffull
Bryce Kiberd
Albert D Fraser
Susan E Tett
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia. chris@pharmacy.uq.edu.au
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Aug;61(7):507-16
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - pharmacokinetics
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Mycophenolic Acid - pharmacokinetics
Nova Scotia
Population Surveillance
Abstract
To investigate the population pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in adult kidney transplant recipients during the crucial first week after transplantation.
Data were collected from 117 patients. MPA plasma concentrations were determined at t=0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after mycophenolate mofetil dosing on days 3, 5 and 7. Population analysis was performed using NONMEM. Covariates screened were sex, age, body weight, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, serum albumin, days of therapy, diabetes mellitus, organ source (live or cadaveric) and co-therapy (tacrolimus or cyclosporine). Final model validity was evaluated using 200 boot strapped samples from the original data. Bias and precision were determined through comparison of observed and predicted concentrations.
Individual concentration-time profiles showed evidence of an absorption lag time and enterohepatic recirculation of MPA in some patients on some occasions. The best base model had bi-exponential elimination with a typical population (SE%) apparent clearance (CL/F) of 29 l/h (5%) and apparent volume of the central compartment of 65 l (7%). CL/F decreased significantly with increasing serum albumin (1.42 l/h reduction in total plasma CL/F with each 1 g/l increase in albumin) and was 27% greater in patients receiving cyclosporine than in those receiving tacrolimus. Evaluation of the final model showed close agreement between pairs of boot strapped and final model parameter estimates (all differences
PubMed ID
16049701 View in PubMed
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Quantifying the use of the statin antilipemic drugs: comparisons and contrasts between Nova Scotia, Canada, and Queensland, Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174539
Source
Clin Ther. 2005 Apr;27(4):497-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Charmaine Cooke
Lisa Nissen
Ingrid Sketris
Susan E Tett
Author Affiliation
Initiative for Medication Management, Policy Analysis, Research, and Training, College of Pharmacy,Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Clin Ther. 2005 Apr;27(4):497-508
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Databases, Factual
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia
Queensland
Abstract
Jurisdictions are developing public drug insurance systems to improve access to pharmaceuticals, cost-effective prescribing, and patient health and well-being. We compared 2 jurisdictions with different pharmaceutical policies to determine prescribing patterns for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (ie, statins).
The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of using available prescription administrative databases to compare the use of statins in Queensland, Australia, and in Nova Scotia, Canada.
Data from the Nova Scotia Pharmacare Program and the Health Insurance Commission in Australia were used to obtain dispensing data. Utilization was compared for the 5-year period from 1997 through 2001, using the World Health Organization anatomic therapeutic chemical/defined daily dose (DDD) system.
In the year 2001, there were 177,000 beneficiaries in the public drug plan in Nova Scotia (62% aged > or = 65 years old) and 960,000 concession beneficiaries (pensioners and social security recipients, 61 aged > or = 65 years) in Queensland. These 2 groups were comparable. The overall utilization of statin medications increased steadily in both areas over the study period, from 50 to 205 DDD/1000 beneficiaries per day. Comparison of the 2 growth lines showed no statistically significant differences in overall statin use despite differences in brand availabilities and policies about prescribing. In the year 2001, atorvastatin was the most commonly prescribed statin in both areas, comprising 46% of statin use in Nova Scotia and 51% in Queensland. Mean doses of each statin prescribed were slightly above the DDDs. Expenditure on statins per 1000 beneficiaries and per DDD were similar in each jurisdiction, being slightly higher in Nova Scotia.
Despite differences in pharmaceutical reimbursement systems, use of the statins was similar in Nova Scotia and Queensland. The feasibility of the methodology was demonstrated. Future studies, including comparisons of drug utilization for other classes of drugs for which drug policies may be divergent (eg, different pricing structures or prior authorization requirements), or for which less evidence for appropriate use is available, may be useful.
PubMed ID
15922822 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.