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9 records – page 1 of 1.

An interprofessional educational intervention on delirium for health care teams: providing opportunities to enhance collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154205
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Dec;22(6):658-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008

Caring for patients and families at end of life: the experiences of nurses during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127555
Source
Dynamics. 2011;22(4):31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Brandi Vanderspank-Wright
Frances Fothergill-Bourbonnais
Susan Brajtman
Pierre Gagnon
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, School of Nursing. bvand093@uottawa.ca
Source
Dynamics. 2011;22(4):31-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Interviews as Topic
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Process
Ontario
Professional-Family Relations
Terminal Care
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is a process in which active treatment and the accompanying technology are removed, ending in the death of the patient.
To understand the lived experience of critical care nurses who care for patients during the process of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment.
A phenomenological study was undertaken and interviews were conducted with six critical care nurses.
The essence of this experience was described by these nurses as "trying to do the right thing". Three major themes emerged: A journey--creating comfort along the way, working in professional angst, and providing memories.
PubMed ID
22282952 View in PubMed
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Caring for patients with terminal delirium: palliative care unit and home care nurses' experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169148
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2006 Apr;12(4):150-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Susan Brajtman
Kathryn Higuchi
Christine McPherson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. brajtman@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2006 Apr;12(4):150-6
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delirium - nursing
Education, Nursing
Home Care Services
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Palliative Care
Abstract
To explore palliative care unit and home care nurses' experiences of caring for patients with terminal delirium.
A qualitative exploratory design using individual interviews.
Participants included five nurses working in an interdisciplinary palliative care unit located in a large Canadian city hospital, and four nurses from a palliative home care nursing team located in the same city.
Nurses in both sites experienced multiple challenges caring for delirious patients. Additional education on delirium and collaborative teamwork were viewed as key factors in enhancing their ability to care for and support this patient and family population. Four core themes reflected the participants' perceptions and experiences: experiencing distress; the importance of presence; valuing the team; and the need to know more.
Findings suggest the need for interdisciplinary educational initiatives focused on the identification and management of terminal delirium, and targeted to the specific context in which nurses practise.
PubMed ID
16723959 View in PubMed
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Enhancing interprofessional education in end-of-life care: an interdisciplinary exploration of death and dying in literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149135
Source
J Palliat Care. 2009;25(2):125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Susan Brajtman
Pippa Hall
Peter Barnes
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2009;25(2):125-31
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Professional
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Ontario
Palliative Care
Teaching - methods
Teaching Materials
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
19678465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health information systems design to support a nursing model of care: opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151434
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:177-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Craig E Kuziemsky
Lara Varpio
Pippa Hall
Lynn Casimiro
Elaine Leipe
Lynda Weaver
Wilma Jelley
Betty Cragg
Susan Brajtman
Peter Barnes
Colla Macdonald
Stéphane Poitras
Author Affiliation
Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada. kuziemsky@telfer.uottawa.ca
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:177-85
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospice Care
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Theoretical
Nursing Care - standards
Nursing Informatics - organization & administration
Abstract
The design and implementation of health information systems (HISs) in team-based settings is complex owing to the multiple users with different perspectives who interact with the system. We argue that such perspectives must be understood prior to designing and implementing HISs. One specific type of team-based model is a nursing care model. In such a model, care is provided through an interdisciplinary team that is lead by the nursing staff. We analyze a nursing-based model of care according to the context of the organization, clinical unit, and individual as defined by the Contextual Implementation Model [1]. We then discuss how the nursing model will be affected by automation using different HISs.
PubMed ID
19380933 View in PubMed
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Providing direction for change: assessing Canadian nursing students learning needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162931
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 May;13(5):213-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Susan Brajtman
Frances Fothergill-Bourbonnais
Alberta Casey
Diane Alain
Valerie Fiset
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Algonquin College, University of Ottawa, Canada. brajtman@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2007 May;13(5):213-21
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - standards
Educational Measurement
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Organizational Innovation
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Students, Nursing - psychology
Terminal Care - standards
Abstract
To examine the current curriculum content and learning needs of graduating nursing students related to end-of-life care (EOLC).
A survey method was employed.
A purposive sample of 58 Anglophone and Francophone students completed the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing (PCQN) and Frommelt's Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD). Students responded to open-ended questions regarding perceptions of preparedness to care for terminally ill patients, and provided suggestions for changes to the curriculum. Key informant educators identified opportunities to include EOLC content in courses and clinical placements.
Results indicated that students held positive attitudes towards caring for dying patients, had modest knowledge levels, and that one third did not feel adequately prepared to care for dying patients. Although EOLC education tends to be threaded throughout the program, the emphasis is dependent upon the commitment of individual professors and clinical instructors with experience and/or expertise in this area.
Students and educators agreed more emphasis on EOLC was needed. Recommendations include development of teaching strategies and experiential learning in EOLC throughout the curriculum.
PubMed ID
17577173 View in PubMed
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Self-perceived burden to others: patient and family caregiver correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159896
Source
J Palliat Care. 2007;23(3):135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Christine J McPherson
Keith G Wilson
Michelle M Lobchuk
Susan Brajtman
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2007;23(3):135-42
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Caregivers
Cost of Illness
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Ontario
Palliative Care
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
To provide further evidence about the prevalence and correlates of the sense of "self-perceived burden" (SPB) to others, and to examine its association with caregiver reports of burden.
The participants were 65 patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. Patients completed measures of SPB and family members completed a caregiver burden scale.
SPB was experienced at minimal to mild levels by 35% of patients, and at moderate to extreme levels by another 28%. It was correlated with some physical symptoms, but more frequently with psychological symptoms. The family members of patients who reported that SPB was a significant problem had higher scores on the caregiver burden scale than family members of other patients (p=0.048), although the overall correlation was modest.
SPB is a common and distressing concern for many patients receiving palliative care and is associated with a number of other distressing concerns.
PubMed ID
18069434 View in PubMed
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Survey of educators' end-of-life care learning needs in a Canadian baccalaureate nursing programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150592
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 May;15(5):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Susan Brajtman
Frances Fothergill-Bourbonnais
Valerie Fiset
Diane Alain
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Canada. brajtman@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 May;15(5):233-41
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Canada
Education, Nursing
Humans
Needs Assessment
Terminal Care
Abstract
To examine the potential need for faculty development in end-of-life care (EOLC) of theory and clinical educators in a collaborative bilingual undergraduate nursing programme in a Canadian university.
A purposive sample of 53 Anglophone and Francophone theory and clinical educators completed the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing, the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale and an adapted Educators Educational Needs Questionnaire (Patterson et al, 1997).
Results indicated that educators held positive attitudes towards caring for dying patients and had modest knowledge levels. Participants identified personal educational needs, preferred learning formats, support and barriers to teaching EOLC and to their participation in continuing educational programmes. Strategies to enhance the teaching and learning of EOLC content in the theory and clinical context were suggested.
Nurse educators require time, opportunities and relevant resources to develop the competencies required to support the theoretical and experiential learning of students in EOLC. Recommendations include a variety of approaches for faculty development initiatives, including face to face and virtual, which allow nurse educators to share expertise.
PubMed ID
19491749 View in PubMed
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Toward better care of delirious patients at the end of life: a pilot study of an interprofessional educational intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123339
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 Sep;26(5):422-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Susan Brajtman
David Wright
Pippa Hall
Shirley H Bush
Enkenyelesh Bekele
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H8M5. brajtman@uottawa.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 Sep;26(5):422-5
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delirium - nursing
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Pilot Projects
Problem-Based Learning
Quality of Health Care
Residential Facilities
Terminal Care - standards
Abstract
Symptom distress with end-of-life delirium (EOLD) is complex and multidimensional, and interprofessional (IP) teams require knowledge and skill to effectively care for these patients and their families. The purpose of this pilot study was to test an educational intervention about EOLD for IP teams at a long-term care facility and a hospice. The intervention included a comprehensive self-learning module (SLM) on EOLD and IP teamwork; a modified McMaster-Ottawa team objective structured clinical encounter (TOSCE) and a didactic "theory burst" on the principles of delirium assessment, diagnosis and management. Evaluation tools completed by participants included the interprofessional collaborative competencies attainment survey (ICCAS) and the W(e) Learn. Two groups at each site participated in 1-hour sessions, repeated 2 weeks later. Only one group from each site received the SLM after the first session. Researchers scored EOLD knowledge and IP team functioning in both sessions. Results suggest that the intervention improved EOLD knowledge and perceptions of IP competence and supports the value of the TOSCE as an IP teaching method. The module does not appear responsible for the changes. Future studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of the individual components used in this study, and to tailor the intervention to individual care contexts.
PubMed ID
22708995 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.