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An educational intervention to enhance nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173724
Source
Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):997-1020
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Liane Ginsburg
Peter G Norton
Ann Casebeer
Steven Lewis
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):997-1020
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Leadership
Male
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Regression Analysis
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
To design a training intervention and then test its effect on nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.
Three hundred and fifty-six nurses in clinical leadership roles (nurse managers and educators/CNSs) in two Canadian multi-site teaching hospitals (study and control).
A prospective evaluation of a patient safety training intervention using a quasi-experimental untreated control group design with pretest and posttest. Nurses in clinical leadership roles in the study group were invited to participate in two patient safety workshops over a 6-month period. Individuals in the study and control groups completed surveys measuring patient safety culture and leadership for improvement prior to training and 4 months following the second workshop.
Individual nurse clinical leaders were the unit of analysis. Exploratory factor analysis of the safety culture items was conducted; repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of the training intervention on perceived safety culture (three factors). Hierarchical regression analyses looked at the influence of demographics, leadership for improvement, and the training intervention on nurse leaders' perceptions of safety culture.
A statistically significant improvement in one of three safety culture measures was shown for the study group (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
16033489 View in PubMed
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Dances with the pharmaceutical industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191223
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Feb 19;166(4):448-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2002
Author
Elaine Gibson
Françoise Baylis
Steven Lewis
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. elaine.gibson@dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Feb 19;166(4):448-50
Date
Feb-19-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - economics
Clinical Trials as Topic - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Conflict of Interest
Drug Industry - economics
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Iron Chelating Agents - adverse effects
Ontario
Pyridones - adverse effects
Scientific Misconduct
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Sep 18;165(6):783-511584569
Comment In: CMAJ. 2002 Feb 19;166(4):413, 41511873912
Comment In: CMAJ. 2002 Jul 9;167(1):12-312137066
Comment In: CMAJ. 2002 Jul 9;167(1):11; author reply 11-212137065
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Sep 18;165(6):783-511584569
PubMed ID
11873922 View in PubMed
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Enlist in our MASH unit: an invitation to join the Meaningful Analogies in Sports and Health network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138278
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(4):e175-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Steven Lewis
Mark Wahba
Mary Smillie
Author Affiliation
Access Consulting Ltd., 208–416 21st St. E, Saskatoon SK S7K 0C2, Canada. Steven.Lewis@sasktel.net
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(4):e175-6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Decision Making
Efficiency, Organizational
Evidence-Based Practice
Humans
Saskatchewan
Sports Medicine - organization & administration
Task Performance and Analysis
PubMed ID
22567072 View in PubMed
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Identifying potentially avoidable hospital admissions from canadian long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152975
Source
Med Care. 2009 Feb;47(2):250-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Jennifer D Walker
Gary F Teare
David B Hogan
Steven Lewis
Colleen J Maxwell
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 2009 Feb;47(2):250-4
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Long-Term Care - standards
Ontario
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Preventive Health Services - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Reference Standards
Sepsis - epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The provision of preventive services and continuity of care are important aspects of long-term care (LTC). A proposed quality indicator of such care is the rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). As the ACSC approach to identifying potentially avoidable hospitalizations (PAH) was developed for younger community-dwelling adults in the United States, we sought to examine its applicability as a quality indicator for older institutionalized residents in Canada.
ACSCs were identified in a linked hospital-based LTC and acute care administrative database at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Ontario, Canada. An expert panel was then convened to assess the applicability of existing ACSCs to an older institutionalized population in Canada and to develop consensus-based revisions appropriate to this setting. The revised definition of PAH was then applied to the same linked database.
The proportion of hospitalizations categorized as a PAH using the original ACSCs was 47% (4177 of 8885). The panel suggested the inclusion of 2 new conditions (septicemia and falls/fractures) coupled with the deletion of 4 of the original ACSCs (immunization-preventable conditions; nutritional deficiency; severe ear, nose and throat infections; tuberculosis) that were rare hospital diagnoses in this population. Using the revised definition, 55% of hospitalizations (4874) were identified as potentially avoidable.
Changes to the original list of ACSCs led to more hospitalizations being categorized as potentially avoidable. Significant variation between LTC facilities and over time in our PAH indicator may identify areas for improvement in preventive services and continuity of care for LTC residents.
PubMed ID
19169127 View in PubMed
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Primary healthcare: the all-too-quiet revolution in waiting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176136
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(1):89-90, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Steven Lewis
Jeanette Edwards
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health and Policy Studies, University of Calgary.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(1):89-90, 4
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Preventive Health Services - supply & distribution
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
Remodelling the kitchen won't help the house with a weak foundation. The same holds truth in healthcare. We cannot solve quality and access problems or deal effectively with wait times unless primary healthcare the foundation of the system--is solid.
Notes
Comment In: Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):916078392
PubMed ID
15715340 View in PubMed
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Sampling 'hard-to-reach' populations in health research: yield from a study targeting Americans living in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155621
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2008;8:57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Danielle A Southern
Steven Lewis
Colleen J Maxwell
James R Dunn
Tom W Noseworthy
Gail Corbett
Karen Thomas
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health and Policy Studies & Dept, of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada. dasouthe@ucalgary.ca
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2008;8:57
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Delivery of Health Care
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
United States - ethnology
Abstract
Some populations targeted in survey research can be hard to reach, either because of lack of contact information, or non-existent databases to inform sampling. Here, we present a methodological "case-report" of the yield of a multi-step survey study assessing views on health care among American emigres to Canada, a hard-to-reach population.
To sample this hard-to-reach population, we held a live media conference, supplemented by a nation-wide media release announcing the study. We prepared an 'op-ed' piece describing the study and how to participate. We paid for advertisements in 6 newspapers. We sent the survey information to targeted organizations. And lastly, we asked those who completed the web survey to send the information to others. We use descriptive statistics to document the method's yield.
The combined media strategies led to 4 television news interviews, 10 newspaper stories, 1 editorial and 2 radio interviews. 458 unique individuals accessed the on-line survey, among whom 310 eligible subjects provided responses to the key study questions. Fifty-six percent reported that they became aware of the survey via media outlets, 26% by word of mouth, and 9% through both the media and word of mouth.
Our multi-step communication method yielded a sufficient sample of Americans living in Canada. This combination of paid and unpaid media exposure can be considered by others as a unique methodological approach to identifying and sampling hard-to-reach populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18710574 View in PubMed
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The sustainability of Canada's healthcare system: a framework for advancing the debate. Commentary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158828
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(2):103-4; author reply 105-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Steven Lewis
Author Affiliation
Access Consulting Ltd., Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(2):103-4; author reply 105-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making, Organizational
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Care Costs - trends
Health Expenditures - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics - trends
Humans
National Health Programs - economics - standards
Policy Making
Total Quality Management
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Q. 2007;10(2):96-10318271106
PubMed ID
18271107 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.