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Job satisfaction among Canadian orthodontists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184964
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2003 Jun;123(6):695-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Stephen F Roth
Giseon Heo
Connie Varnhagen
Kenneth E Glover
Paul W Major
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2003 Jun;123(6):695-700
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Dental Staff
Dentist-Patient Relations
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Orthodontics - statistics & numerical data
Practice Management, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Societies, Dental
Stress, Physiological - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
Job satisfaction has been well researched for many professions, including general dentistry. The job satisfaction of orthodontists has not been adequately studied. The aims of this study were to describe job satisfaction among orthodontists and to determine characteristics associated with job satisfaction in the profession. A self-administered, anonymous survey was mailed to Canadian orthodontists. It included a modified version of the Dentist Satisfaction Survey, an overall occupational stress score, and items addressing various characteristics of the respondents. Of 654 mailed surveys, 335 were returned, for a response rate of 51.2%. Most orthodontists (79.3%) were classified as satisfied according to the overall job satisfaction scale of the Dentist Satisfaction Survey; however, some (2.5%) were classified as dissatisfied. The facets of orthodontics with the highest degree of satisfaction were patient relations (93%), delivery of care (86%), respect (84%), professional relations (80%), and staff (76%). The most dissatisfaction was associated with personal time (26%) and practice management (15%). Stepwise multiple regression analysis resulted in a model including overall occupational stress, membership in the Canadian Association of Orthodontists, total number of staff, and age to account for 27.1% of the variation in the overall job satisfaction scale. Based on accountable sources of variance, the overall job satisfaction scale seems to be more affected by other variables than the characteristics evaluated by this survey.
PubMed ID
12806353 View in PubMed
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Occupational stress among Canadian orthodontists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186485
Source
Angle Orthod. 2003 Feb;73(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Stephen F Roth
Giseon Heo
Connie Varnhagen
Kenneth E Glover
Paul W Major
Source
Angle Orthod. 2003 Feb;73(1):43-50
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Dentist-Patient Relations
Education, Dental, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Equipment Failure
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Matched-Pair Analysis
Motivation
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Oral Hygiene
Orthodontic Appliances - statistics & numerical data
Orthodontics
Patient compliance
Practice Management, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Stress, Physiological - epidemiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Time Management
Tooth Demineralization - prevention & control
Abstract
The occupational stress associated with many professions, including general dentistry, has been well researched. An anonymous, self-administered, mail-out survey was distributed to Canadian orthodontists. The survey included 67 potential stressors, an overall occupational stress score, an overall job satisfaction scale, and items addressing various characteristics of the respondents. The response rate was 51.2% (335/654). Pronounced differences were found between the respondents in the evaluation of potential stressors and the overall occupational stress score. The category of stressors with the highest mean severity of stress scores was time-related stressors. The stressors with high mean severity scores and high mean frequency scores were as follows: falling behind schedule, trying to keep to a schedule, constant time pressures, patients with broken appliances, and motivating patients with poor OH and/or decalcification. Stepwise multiple regression determined a model, involving overall job satisfaction, age, participation in a study group, hours worked per week, part-time academics, days of continuing education per year, and participation in stress management, to account for 35.9% of the variation in overall occupational stress scores. The results indicate the importance of time-management skills in reducing occupational stress, but other factors seem to have more effect on reported occupational stress than do the characteristics addressed by this survey.
PubMed ID
12607854 View in PubMed
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The relationship between occupational stress and job satisfaction in orthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179439
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2004 Jul;126(1):106-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Stephen F Roth
Giseon Heo
Connie Varnhagen
Paul W Major
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2N8.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2004 Jul;126(1):106-9
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Dentist-Patient Relations
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Orthodontics - statistics & numerical data
Practice Management, Dental
Questionnaires
Statistics as Topic
Stress, Physiological - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The goal of this project was to describe the relationship between overall occupational stress (OS), categories of stressors, overall job satisfaction (JS), and facets of JS in orthodontics. Canadian orthodontists were mailed an anonymous, self-administered survey. The response rate was 51.2% (335 of 654). The survey included a list of 67 potential stressors representing 6 categories, an overall OS score, and a modified version of the Dentists Satisfaction Survey (DSS). The correlation between the overall OS score and the overall JS scale of the DSS was r = -0.392. The overall OS scores were most strongly correlated to satisfaction with personal time (r = -0.385, P
PubMed ID
15224066 View in PubMed
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