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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292349
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Ecology and Environmental Biology, Ghent University , 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Date
Nov-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Geologic sediments
Metals
North Sea
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286492
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Date
Oct-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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Background concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in deep core sediments from the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea: A proposed update of the OSPAR Commission background values for these sea areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305897
Source
Chemosphere. 2020 Jul; 251:126344
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2020
Author
Stepan Boitsov
Jarle Klungsøyr
Henning K B Jensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: stepan.boitsov@hi.no.
Source
Chemosphere. 2020 Jul; 251:126344
Date
Jul-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Atlantic Ocean
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Norway
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Svalbard
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Geochemical studies of 174 sediment cores collected by the MAREANO mapping program in Norwegian waters of the North Atlantic Ocean give new sets of values of background concentrations (BCs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for the studied regions. The study is based on deep core sediment samples representing background levels of PAHs. The samples selected were only from the deeper parts of undisturbed sediment cores with low, stable concentrations of petrogenic and pyrogenic PAHs, with low variation for individual PAH compounds between the samples within the same core, and from below the parts of the cores dated with 210Pb to approximately the last 100-150 years. The results show that the main part of the studied area has BCs different from those previously established by OSPAR Commission (OSPAR) for the North-East Atlantic. Another area in central Barents Sea has a separate set of BCs of pyrogenic PAHs, apparently due to the influence from marginal ice zone mechanisms. A third area with its own set of BCs has been established for north-western Barents Sea off the coast of Svalbard, due to high natural contents of PAHs in this area. BCs for several PAHs not included in the present OSPAR list are also provided.
PubMed ID
32443255 View in PubMed
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Levels and temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) from the southern Barents Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298327
Source
Environ Res. 2019 Feb 08; 172:89-97
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-08-2019
Author
Stepan Boitsov
Bjørn Einar Grøsvik
Guri Nesje
Ketil Malde
Jarle Klungsøyr
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, 5817 Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: stepan.boitsov@hi.no.
Source
Environ Res. 2019 Feb 08; 172:89-97
Date
Feb-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Liver samples of two gadoid species, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), sampled in the southern Barents Sea in the period 1992-2015, were studied for the levels of six types of persistent organic pollutants (POPs): polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated organic pesticides (DDTs, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), trans-nonachlor (TNC)), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Higher average levels were found in cod than in haddock. Sampling approximately every third year allowed studies of temporal trends for all the compound groups except PBDEs. Time series are reported for 1992-2015 for Atlantic cod and for 1998-2015 for haddock. Decreasing temporal trends have been modeled in cod for the analyzed POPs for this time period. The decrease seems to be slowing down in the later years. HCB levels showed least decrease with time among all the contaminants, with the poorest fit to the proposed model. Similar time trends were found in haddock, but the decrease is less apparent due to shorter time series. The observed time trends of legacy POPs document the effectiveness of efforts during the 1990s to reduce the levels of these contaminants in the marine environment but question the possibility to eliminate them altogether from the marine environment in the foreseeable future.
PubMed ID
30782539 View in PubMed
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