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Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257621
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;215(1):127-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2014
Author
Maria Knutzen
Stål Bjørkly
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Nina Helen Mjøsund
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Research and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, P.O.Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;215(1):127-33
Date
Jan-30-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Registries
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.
PubMed ID
24230996 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of psychiatric inpatients who experienced restraint and those who did not: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134890
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 May;62(5):492-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Maria Knutzen
Nina H Mjosund
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Education, Oslo University Hospital,Oslo, Norway. maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 May;62(5):492-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Regression Analysis
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Use of restraint in acute psychiatric wards is highly controversial. Knowledge is limited about the characteristics of patients who are restrained and the predictors of use of restraint. This study examined whether restrained patients differed from nonrestrained patients in demographic, clinical, and medicolegal variables and to what extent the variables predicted use of restraint.
A two-year retrospective case-control design was used. The sample comprised all restrained patients (N=375) and a randomly selected control group of nonrestrained patients (N=374) from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards in Norway. Data sources were restraint protocols and electronic patient files.
The restrained patients were significantly younger and more likely to be men, to reside outside the wards' catchment areas, and to have an immigrant background. Restrained patients also had more admissions and longer inpatient stays than nonrestrained patients and were more likely to be involuntarily referred and to have one or more of the following ICD-10 diagnoses: a substance use disorder, schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder, and bipolar disorder. Binary logistic regression analyses, adjusting for age, gender, immigrant background, and catchment area, indicated that the number of admissions, length of stay, legal basis for referral, and diagnosis each independently predicted the use of restraint. No interactions were found.
Use of restraint was predicted by multiple admissions, long inpatient stays, involuntary admission, and serious mental illness. Identifying patients at risk may inform the development of alternatives to restraint for these patients.
PubMed ID
21532074 View in PubMed
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Childhood trauma is associated with severe clinical characteristics of bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106157
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2013 Oct;74(10):991-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Bruno Etain
Monica Aas
Ole A Andreassen
Steinar Lorentzen
Ingrid Dieset
Sebastien Gard
Jean-Pierre Kahn
Frank Bellivier
Marion Leboyer
Ingrid Melle
Chantal Henry
Author Affiliation
Pôle de Psychiatrie, Hôpital Henri Mondor-Albert Chenevier, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP); and Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U955.
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2013 Oct;74(10):991-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - classification - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Statistics as Topic
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Beyond genetic risk variants, the pathophysiology of bipolar disorders is likely to be partly determined by environmental susceptibility factors. Our study is one of the first to investigate, in a large sample of well-characterized bipolar patients, associations between clinical presentations and childhood trauma subtypes, including neglect and abuse items.
587 patients with DSM-IV-defined bipolar disorder were recruited from France and Norway between 1996-2008 and 2007-2012, respectively. History of childhood trauma was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Clinical variables were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (Norwegian sample) or the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (French sample).
Earlier age at onset of bipolar illness, suicide attempts, rapid cycling, and an increased number of depressive episodes each had significant associations (P = .001) with at least 1 subtype of childhood trauma (emotional abuse, sexual abuse, and emotional neglect). Multivariate analyses investigating trauma variables together showed that both emotional and sexual abuse were independent predictors of lower age at onset (P = .002 for each) and history of suicide attempts (OR = 1.60 [95% CI, 1.07 to 2.39], P = .023; OR = 1.80 [95% CI, 1.14 to 2.86], P = .012, respectively), while sexual abuse was the strongest predictor of rapid cycling (OR = 2.04 [95% CI, 1.21 to 3.42], P = .007). Females reported overall higher childhood trauma frequency and greater associations to clinical expressions than males (P values
PubMed ID
24229750 View in PubMed
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A genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder in Norwegian individuals, followed by replication in Icelandic sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143713
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Oct;126(1-2):312-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Srdjan Djurovic
Omar Gustafsson
Morten Mattingsdal
Lavinia Athanasiu
Thomas Bjella
Martin Tesli
Ingrid Agartz
Steinar Lorentzen
Ingrid Melle
Gunnar Morken
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. srdjan.djurovic@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Oct;126(1-2):312-6
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Iceland
Middle Aged
Norway
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Schizophrenia - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study we investigated genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder in a homogenous Norwegian sample, and potential genetic overlap with schizophrenia, using the Affymetrix 6.0 array.
We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) by genotyping 620 390 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a case-control sample of Norwegian origin (the TOP study) including bipolar disorder (n=194), healthy controls (n=336) and schizophrenia (n=230), followed by replication and combined analysis in a genetically concordant Icelandic sample of bipolar disorder (n=435), and healthy controls (n=10,258).
We selected 1000 markers with the lowest P values in the TOP discovery GWAS and tested these (or their surrogates) for association in the Icelandic replication sample. Polymorphisms on 35 loci were confirmed associated with bipolar disorder (nominal P value
PubMed ID
20451256 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2015 Oct;65(4):543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Steinar Lorentzen
Theresa Wilberg
Egil W Martinsen
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2015 Oct;65(4):543-51
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group - economics - history - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper gives an overview of group psychotherapy in Norway: the history, approaches in use, programs for systematic training, how group services are financed, and finally how practice and research are integrated in the public mental health system.
PubMed ID
26401797 View in PubMed
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Intron 12 in NTRK3 is associated with bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142805
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Feb 28;185(3):358-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2011
Author
Lavinia Athanasiu
Morten Mattingsdal
Ingrid Melle
Elin Inderhaug
Trude Lien
Ingrid Agartz
Steinar Lorentzen
Gunnar Morken
Ole A Andreassen
Srdjan Djurovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital-Ullevål, Oslo, Norway. lavinia.athanasiu@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Feb 28;185(3):358-62
Date
Feb-28-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Introns - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Receptor, trkC - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Based on the important role of neurotrophic factors in brain development and plasticity and reports of association between schizophrenia and the gene neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (NTRK3), we investigated associations of bipolar disorder with polymorphisms in NTRK3. Recently, our group reported evidence for a possible association of NTRK3 polymorphisms with hippocampal function and schizophrenia. In the present study, we used a homogenous Norwegian case-control sample (the TOP study) consisting of 194 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder and 336 healthy controls genotyped on the Affymetrix Genome-wide Human SNP Array 6.0. In total 149 markers were investigated for SNP-disease association. Polymorphisms in over 20 markers were nominally associated with bipolar disorder, covering intron 5 to intron 12. Interestingly, our markers appeared to be located close or within the linkage regions reported in schizophrenia, early-onset major depressive disorder and eating disorder, supporting the hypothesis that some genes influence risk beyond traditional diagnostic boundaries.
PubMed ID
20554328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118336
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2013 Aug 30;209(1):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2013
Author
Maria Knutzen
Stål Bjørkly
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Nina Helen Mjøsund
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2013 Aug 30;209(1):91-7
Date
Aug-30-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.
PubMed ID
23219102 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychodynamic group psychotherapy: impact of group length and therapist professional characteristics on development of therapeutic alliance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134066
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Sep;19(5):420-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steinar Lorentzen
Jan Vegard Bakali
Anne Grete Hersoug
Knut A Hagtvet
Torleif Ruud
Per Høglend
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. steinar.lorentzen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Sep;19(5):420-33
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapeutic Processes
Psychotherapy - education - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Sociometric Techniques
Time Factors
Abstract
Little research has been done on therapeutic alliance in group psychotherapy, especially the impact of treatment duration and therapist professional characteristics.
Therapeutic alliance was rated by patients on the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form at three time points (sessions 3, 10 and 17) in a randomized controlled trial of short-term and long-term psychodynamic group psychotherapy. As predictors we selected therapist clinical experience and length of didactic training, which have demonstrated ambiguous results in previous research. Linear latent variable growth curve models (structural equation modeling) were developed for the three Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form subscales bond, task and goal.
We found a significant variance in individual growth curves (intercepts and slopes) but no differential development due to group length. Longer therapist formal training had a negative impact on early values of subscale task in both treatments. There was an interaction between length of the therapists' clinical experience and group length on early bond, task and goal: therapists with longer clinical experience were rated lower on initial bond in the long-term group but less so in the short-term group. Longer clinical experience influenced initial task and goal positively in the short-term group but was unimportant for task or significantly negative for goal in the long-term group.
There was no mean development of alliance, and group length did not differentially impact the alliance during 6 months. Early ratings of the three Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form subscales partly reflected different preparations of patients in the two group formats, partly therapist characteristics, but more research is needed to see how these aspects impact alliance development and outcome. Therapists should pay attention to all three aspects of the alliance, when they prepare patients for group therapy.
In psychodynamic groups, length of therapy does not differentiate the overall level or the development of member-leader alliance. Within psychodynamic groups, each individual appear to have their unique perception of the member-leader alliance. Therapists with longer formal psychotherapy training may be less successful in establishing early agreement with patients on the tasks of psychodynamic group psychotherapy. Patients perceive a somewhat lower degree of early emotional bonding with the more clinically experienced therapists in long-term psychodynamics groups. Therapists with more clinical experience may contribute to a stronger degree of initial agreement with patients on the tasks and goals of short-term group psychotherapy.
PubMed ID
21626613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-harm in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124753
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2012;16(2):111-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Erlend Mork
Lars Mehlum
Elizabeth A Barrett
Ingrid Agartz
Jill M Harkavy-Friedman
Steinar Lorentzen
Ingrid Melle
Ole A Andreassen
Fredrik A Walby
Author Affiliation
National Centre for SuicideResearch and Prevention, Institute ofClinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. erlend.mork@medisin.uio.no
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2012;16(2):111-23
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - complications
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and gender profile of self-harm in a cross-sectional sample of 388 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. All patients were interviewed and assessed with respect to lifetime self-harm and relevant clinical variables. An overall of 49% of the patients reported self-harm which was associated with female gender, having had a depressive episode, younger age at psychosis onset, alcohol abuse or dependence, current suicidality, awareness of illness, and low adherence to prescribed medication. Higher awareness of having a mental disorder was associated with self-harm in men only, while emotional dysregulation was associated with self-harm in women only. We conclude that while self-harm in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders is highly prevalent in both genders, risk factors in men and women differ in several important ways.
PubMed ID
22551042 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.