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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-2012
Author
Steinar Krokstad
Author Affiliation
HUNT forskningssenter, Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Norway. steinak@ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2186-8
Date
Oct-16-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Preventive Medicine
Public Health
PubMed ID
23076491 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anxiety and Depression Symptoms Among Farmers: The HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279219
Source
J Agromedicine. 2016;21(1):24-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Magnhild Oust Torske
Bjørn Hilt
David Glasscock
Peter Lundqvist
Steinar Krokstad
Source
J Agromedicine. 2016;21(1):24-33
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Farmers - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Agriculture has undergone profound changes, and farmers face a wide variety of stressors. Our aim was to study the levels of anxiety and depression symptoms among Norwegian farmers compared with other occupational groups. Working participants in the HUNT3 Survey (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, 2006-2008), aged 19-66.9 years, were included in this cross-sectional study. We compared farmers (women, n = 317; men, n = 1,100) with HUNT3 participants working in other occupational groups (women, n = 13,429; men, n = 10,026), classified according to socioeconomic status. We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to measure anxiety and depression symptoms. Both male and female farmers had higher levels of depression symptoms than the general working population, but the levels of anxiety symptoms did not differ. The differences in depression symptom levels between farmers and the general working population increased with age. In an age-adjusted logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio (OR) for depression caseness (HADS-D =8) when compared with the general working population was 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.83) in men and 1.29 (95% CI: 0.85-1.95) in women. Male farmers had a higher OR of depression caseness than any other occupational group (OR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.52-2.49, using higher-grade professionals as reference). Female farmers had an OR similar to men (2.00, 95% CI: 1.26-3.17), but lower than other manual occupations. We found that farmers had high levels of depression symptoms and average levels of anxiety symptoms compared with other occupational groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26488439 View in PubMed
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Are there educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality in Norway? The HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120073
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):641-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Joakim D Dalen
Tim Huijts
Steinar Krokstad
Terje A Eikemo
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University Science and Technology, NTNU Dragvoll, Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap, Trondheim, Norway. joakim.dalen@samfunn.ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):641-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test whether the association between self-rated health and mortality differs between educational groups in Norway, and to examine whether health problems and health-related behaviour can explain any of these differences within a previously unexplored contextual setting.
The study used data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 84-86 (HUNT) with a 20-year follow up. The analyses were performed for respondents between 25-101 years at baseline (n = 56,788). The association between self-rated health and mortality was tested using Cox regression.
The results indicate that although self-rated health is associated with mortality there is no difference in the association between self-rated health and mortality between educational groups. Introducing health-related variables did not have an impact on the result.
Given the small educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality, this supports the reliability of self-reported health as a measurement for objective health.
PubMed ID
23042460 View in PubMed
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The bidirectional association between depression and insomnia: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121774
Source
Psychosom Med. 2012 Sep;74(7):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Børge Sivertsen
Paula Salo
Arnstein Mykletun
Mari Hysing
Ståle Pallesen
Steinar Krokstad
Inger Hilde Nordhus
Simon Øverland
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Christiesgt 13, 5020 Bergen, Norway. borge.sivertsen@fhi.no
Source
Psychosom Med. 2012 Sep;74(7):758-65
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Depression and insomnia are closely linked, yet our understanding of their prospective relationships remains limited. The aim of the current study was to investigate the directionality of association between depression and insomnia.
Data were collected from a prospective population-based study comprising the most recent waves of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) (the HUNT2 in 1995-1997 and the HUNT3 in 2006-2008). A total of 24,715 persons provided valid responses on the relevant questionnaires from both surveys. Study outcomes were onset of depression or insomnia at HUNT3 in persons not reporting the other disorder in HUNT2.
Both insomnia and depression significantly predicted the onset of the other disorder. Participants who did not have depression in HUNT2 but who had insomnia in both HUNT2 and HUNT3 had an odds ratio (OR) of 6.2 of developing depression at HUNT3. Participants who did not have insomnia in HUNT2 but who had depression in both HUNT2 and HUNT3 had an OR of 6.7 of developing insomnia at HUNT3. ORs were only slightly attenuated when adjusting for potential confounding factors.
The results support a bidirectional relationship between insomnia and depression. This finding stands in contrast to the previous studies, which have mainly focused on insomnia as a risk factor for the onset of depression.
PubMed ID
22879427 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular mortality - Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population - The HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287270
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2017 Apr 01;232:127-133
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2017
Author
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Gunnhild Åberge Vie
Steinar Krokstad
Imre Janszky
Pål R Romundstad
Lars J Vatten
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2017 Apr 01;232:127-133
Date
Apr-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Family
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
To compare associations of conventional risk factors with cardiovascular death within couples and in the population as a whole.
We analysed baseline data (1995-97) from the HUNT2 Study in Norway linked to the national Causes of Death Registry. We compared risk within couples using stratified Cox regression.
During 914776 person-years, 3964 cardiovascular deaths occurred, and 1658 of the deaths occurred among 1494 couples. There were consistently stronger associations of serum lipids and blood pressure with cardiovascular mortality within couples compared to the population as a whole. For instance, for systolic blood pressure (per 20mmHg), the hazard ratio (HR) within couples was 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.40) compared to 1.16 (1.12, 1.20) in the total population, and for diastolic pressure (per 10mmHg), the corresponding HRs were 1.16 (1.07, 1.26) and 1.11 (1.08, 1.13). Anthropometric factors (BMI, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio) as well as diabetes, smoking, physical activity, and education, showed nearly identical positive associations within couples and in the total population.
Prospective population studies may tend to slightly underestimate associations of these factors with cardiovascular mortality.
PubMed ID
28082089 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile of the Young-HUNT Study, Norway: a population-based study of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259235
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;43(2):536-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Grete Bratberg
Steinar Krokstad
Arnulf Langhammer
Kristian Hveem
Kristian Midthjell
Jon Heggland
Jostein Holmen
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;43(2):536-44
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The Young-HUNT Study is the adolescent part (13-19 years) of HUNT, the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway. Three cross-sectional surveys have been conducted: Young-HUNT1 (1995-97), Young-HUNT2 (2000-01) and Young-HUNT3 (2006-08). Major public health issues, including somatic and mental health, quality of life and health behaviours are covered. Young-HUNT was performed in schools visited by trained nurses. Data collection included self-reported questionnaires, structured interviews, clinical measurements and, in Young-HUNT3, buccal smears. The total response rates varied from 90% to 83% and the Young-HUNT database includes 17 820 teenagers. Some Young-HUNT1 participants constitute the baseline for two follow-up studies: a 4-year follow-up through adolescence to Young-HUNT2 and an 11-year follow-up into young adulthood to the adult HUNT3. Longitudinal data are also obtained by linkage of data from Young-HUNT to different national health registers. Linkage to family registers allows the possibility of studying genetic and environmental interactions through generations. Presently 20 PhD students are working with the data, 11 Young-HUNT based PhD theses have been completed and more than 50 scientific papers published.
PubMed ID
23382364 View in PubMed
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A comparison of depressive symptoms in elderly medical inpatients and the elderly in a population-based health study (the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study 3).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130876
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Knut Engedal
Steinar Krokstad
Eystein Stordal
Geir Selbæk
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofi e.Helvik@ntnu.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):189-97
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - complications
Female
Health status
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
To compare depression in a sample of the medically hospitalized elderly with elderly people participating in a population-based health study in Norway and further to study the odds for depression, controlling for demographic and health differences between the two samples.
This cross-sectional observational study evaluated 484 medical inpatients from rural areas and 10,765 drawn from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 3 (HUNT-3 Study) including participants from rural and urban areas. All participants were elderly (=65 years) with a mean (± standard deviation) age of 80.7 ± 7.4 and 73.3 ± 6.3 years, respectively. Symptoms of depression were screened by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD).
The prevalence of symptoms indicating mild, moderate or more severe depression (depression score =8) was about the same in both groups. In regression analyses, adjusting demographic and health differences, the odds for depression was lower for the elderly in the hospital sample than in the HUNT-3 Study. Older age, male gender, perceiving general health as poor, having impaired ability to function in daily life, previous consultation or treatment for emotional problems and anxiety (anxiety score =8) were associated with increased odds for depression in the elderly independent of being hospitalized or not.
Surprisingly, we found the odds for depression after controlling for demographic and health variables to be lower in the hospitalized elderly individuals than in the elderly participating in the population-based health study. The health variables that were most strongly associated with an increased risk of depression were poor physical health and anxiety.
PubMed ID
21958367 View in PubMed
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A comparison of life satisfaction in elderly medical inpatients and the elderly in a population-based study: Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135640
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jun;39(4):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Knut Engedal
Steinar Krokstad
Geir Selbæk
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofie.Helvik@ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jun;39(4):337-44
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - prevention & control
Female
Health status
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental health
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Social Participation
Abstract
To compare the quality of life (QOL) in terms of overall life satisfaction in elderly medical inpatients and elderly persons in a large population-based study in Norway, and to study the odds for dissatisfaction, controlling for demographic, health, and social variables.
This cross-sectional observation study included 484 medical inpatients and 10,474 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 3 (HUNT 3 Study). All participants were 65 years and older. Their life satisfaction was assessed with a single-item measure with seven response categories. For analytical purposes the variable was dichotomised; i.e. dissatisfied vs. satisfied with life.
In the logistic regression analysis controlled for demographic, health, and social variables, the odds for experiencing dissatisfaction with life was significantly increased in the hospital sample compared to the participants in the population-based study (OR 1.4). Poor general health, depression, and anxiety were strongly associated with being dissatisfied with life. Furthermore, disability, previous psychological distress, having no friends who could help, and not participating in activities were all associated with dissatisfaction with life.
The hospitalisation of the elderly has implications for the QOL in terms of life satisfaction, but general physical and psychological health seems to have an even stronger impact on life satisfaction. The prevention of the deterioration of physical and mental health in old age seems to be essential for a good life.
PubMed ID
21459872 View in PubMed
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Cultural activity participation and associations with self-perceived health, life-satisfaction and mental health: the Young HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268225
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:544
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Elisabeth Hansen
Erik Sund
Margunn Skjei Knudtsen
Steinar Krokstad
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:544
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Mental health
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Self Concept
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Leisure time activities and culture participation may have health effects and be important in pulic health promotion. More knowledge on how cultural activity participation may influence self-perceived health, life-satisfaction, self-esteem and mental health is needed.
This article use data from the general population-based Norwegian HUNT Study, using the cross-sectional Young-HUNT3 (2006-08) Survey including 8200 adolescents. Data on cultural activity participation, self-perceived health, life-satisfaction, self-esteem, anxiety and depression were collected by self-reported questionnaires.
Both attending meetings or training in an organisation or club, and attending sports events were positively associated with each of the health parameters good self-percieved health, good life-satisfaction, good self-esteem, and low anxiety and depression symptoms. We found differences according to gender and age (13-15 years versus 16-19 years old) for several culture activities, where girls aged 16-19 years seemed to benefit most from being culturally active. The extent of participation seemed to matter. Those who had frequent participation in cultural activities reported better health outcomes compared to inactive adolecents.
The results from this study indicate that participation in cultural activities may be positively associated with health, life-satisfaction and self-esteem in adolescents and thus important in public health promotion. Possible sex and age differences should be taken into account.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26055410 View in PubMed
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Decennial trends and inequalities in healthy life expectancy: The HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290051
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(1):124-131
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Siri H Storeng
Steinar Krokstad
Steinar Westin
Erik R Sund
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(1):124-131
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Norway is experiencing a rising life expectancy combined with an increasing dependency ratio - the ratio of those outside over those within the working force. To provide data relevant for future health policy we wanted to study trends in total and healthy life expectancy in a Norwegian population over three decades (1980s, 1990s and 2000s), both overall and across gender and educational groups.
Data were obtained from the HUNT Study, and the Norwegian Educational Database. We calculated total life expectancy and used the Sullivan method to calculate healthy life expectancies based on self-rated health and self-reported longstanding limiting illness. The change in health expectancies was decomposed into mortality and disability effects.
During three consecutive decades we found an increase in life expectancy for 30-year-olds (~7 years) and expected lifetime in self-rated good health (~6 years), but time without longstanding limiting illness increased less (1.5 years). Women could expect to live longer than men, but the extra life years for females were spent in poor self-rated health and with longstanding limiting illness. Differences in total life expectancy between educational groups decreased, whereas differences in expected lifetime in self-rated good health and lifetime without longstanding limiting illness increased.
The increase in total life expectancy was accompanied by an increasing number of years spent in good self-rated health but more years with longstanding limiting illness. This suggests increasing health care needs for people with chronic diseases, given an increasing number of elderly. Socioeconomic health inequalities remain a challenge for increasing pensioning age.
PubMed ID
29191110 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.