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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
Less detail

COPD predicts mortality in HF: the Norwegian Heart Failure Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97803
Source
J Card Fail. 2010 Mar;16(3):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Jonathan De Blois
Serge Simard
Dan Atar
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier Affilié Universitaire de Québec, Quebec, Canada. jonathan.deblois@med.ulaval.ca
Source
J Card Fail. 2010 Mar;16(3):225-9
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Probability
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (HF) are common clinical conditions that share tobacco as a risk factor. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic impact of COPD on HF patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Norwegian Heart Failure Registry was used. The study included 4132 HF patients (COPD, n = 699) from 22 hospitals (mean follow-up, 13.3 months). COPD patients were older, more often smokers and diabetics, less often on beta-blockers and had a higher heart rate. They were more often in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III or IV (COPD, 63%; no COPD, 51%), although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) distribution was similar. COPD independently predicted death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.188; 95% CI: 1.015 to 1.391; P = 0.03) along with age, creatinine, NYHA Class III/IV (HR, 1.464; 95% CI: 1.286 to 1.667) and diabetes. beta-blockers at baseline were associated with improved survival in patients with LVEF
PubMed ID
20206897 View in PubMed
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Echogenicity of the carotid intima-media complex and cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121999
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Sep;32(5):400-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Jonathan De Blois
Einar Stranden
Tomas Jogestrand
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier Affilié Universitaire de Québec, Québec, Canada. jonathan.deblois@med.ulaval.ca
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Sep;32(5):400-3
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Common - ultrasonography
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) has been associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. A measure of echogenicity, the grey scale median (GSM), has been shown to be inversely correlated with cardiovascular risk factors and to be predictive of mortality in a community-based cohort. We assessed the factors associated with carotid IM-GSM in younger, non-diabetic patients with a recent MI.
A total of 122 patients (women, 25%) aged 31-80 years (61) were recruited 2-3 days after an acute MI. Ultrasound examinations of the carotid arteries were performed 1-12 months after the MI. IMT was 0·78 (SD 0·17) mm on the right side and 0·81 (0·20) mm on the left side (P = 0·05). GSM was 88·60 (range 46-132, SD 18·32) on the right side and 82·10 (40-126, 17·89) on the left side (P = 0·002). Triglycerides (TG) correlated with GSM on both sides (right, r = -0·27, P = 0·003; left, r = -0·18, P = 0·05). On the right side, GSM was 92·15 and 82·26 (P = 0·05) in patients with TG
PubMed ID
22856348 View in PubMed
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Effect of Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on one-year mortality and frequency of repeat acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97289
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2010 May 1;105(9):1229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2010
Author
Christos Milonas
Tomas Jernberg
Johan Lindbäck
Stefan Agewall
Lars Wallentin
Ulf Stenestrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Christos.Milonas@ki.se
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2010 May 1;105(9):1229-34
Date
May-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Controversy exists regarding whether all patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). We examined the association between ACEI treatment and mortality in a large, unselected population of patients with AMI. The present study included 105,224 patients with AMI who were not treated with ACEIs on admission. A logistic regression analysis, including 33 variables, calculated a propensity score for each patient to estimate the probability of receiving ACEIs at discharge, given the background. The association between ACEI treatment at discharge and the 1-year outcome was evaluated in prespecified subgroups using the Cox regression analyses, adjusting for the propensity score and medications at discharge. A total of 38,395 patients (36.5%) received ACEIs at discharge. After adjustment, ACEI treatment was associated with a 24% reduction in mortality (relative risk 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.73 to 0.80). The benefit was largest in patients with a history or present signs of heart failure. In patients without heart failure, a significant benefit of ACEI treatment was seen only in patients with renal dysfunction (relative risk 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.88). In the whole group, the risk of AMI decreased by 7% (relative risk 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 0.96), with a larger effect seen in patients with ST-segment elevation AMI or systolic left ventricular dysfunction. In conclusion, in unselected patients with AMI, ACEI treatment was associated with a reduction in 1-year mortality, mainly in patients with heart failure or renal dysfunction, and a small reduction in the risk of reinfarction, mainly in patients with ST-segment elevation AMI or systolic left ventricular dysfunction.
PubMed ID
20403471 View in PubMed
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Gender differences among Norwegian patients with heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148975
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2011 Feb 3;146(3):354-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-2011
Author
Bjorn Brandsaeter
Dan Atar
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, Division of Cardiology, Aker University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2011 Feb 3;146(3):354-8
Date
Feb-3-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - mortality
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Recent studies have suggested differences in outcome and treatment between men and women with heart failure. The aim of this study was to see if there were gender differences in the treatment and outcome in real life heart failure patients.
Norwegian Heart Failure Registry was used. Three-thousand-six-hundred-and-thirty-two patients (men, n = 2545 (70%), women, n = 1087 (30%)) were included in the study from January 2000 to February 2006. Patients were followed up until death or December 31 2006. The cohort was split into patients with an ejection fraction (EF) less and above 50% and genders were then compared.
In the group with EF = 50% the only difference between basic characteristics was that men had a lower heart rate. In the group with an EF
PubMed ID
19700210 View in PubMed
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Impact of physical activity and body composition on heart function and morphology in middle-aged, abdominally obese women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100512
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Sep;30(5):354-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Michael Eriksson
Joanna Uddén
Erik Hemmingsson
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. ME829107@hotmail.com
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Sep;30(5):354-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bicycling
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Body mass index
Exercise
Female
Heart Ventricles - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - pathology - physiopathology - therapy - ultrasonography
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Waist Circumference
Walking
Abstract
Several studies have shown training induced morphological changes in the heart. Our aim was to assess how frequent, low-intensity exercise (walking and cycling) influences heart function and morphology in abdominally obese women. Fifty women with abdominal obesity (mean age 47.0 +/- 7.5 years, waist circumference (WC) 103.2 +/- 7.8 cm), free of cardiovascular problems were recruited. They were equipped with a bicycle and pedometers and instructed to start commuting in a physically active way for 6 months. Evaluation of cardiac function and morphology was performed using echocardiography (ECHO) before and after 6 months of training. The subjects increased significantly their daily physical activity. After 6 months, there was a significant decrease in WC (from 103.3 +/- 7.9 to 100.8 +/- 8.4 cm, P = 0.0003), in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (126.8 +/- 15.2 to 120.4 +/- 14.5 mmHg, P = 0.0001, and 79.8 +/- 7.8 to 77.8 +/- 8.4 mmHg, P = 0.0006, respectively). ECHO showed an increase in the right ventricular (RV) systolic longitudinal function expressed as tricuspid annular motion from 22.00 +/- 3.30 to 23.05 +/- 3.59 mm, P = 0.015; and a similar trend in left ventricular (LV) mitral annular motion, which increased from 13.09 +/- 1.53 to 13.39 +/- 1.47 mm, P = 0.070. Cycling was associated with reductions in LV systolic and RV diastolic dimensions, whereas walking was not associated with any changes in the ECHO-variables. A reduction in WC by frequent, low-intensity exercise in abdominally obese women is associated with decrease in blood pressure and improved longitudinal RV systolic function.
PubMed ID
20646010 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impaired endothelial function in persons with obstructive sleep apnoea: impact of obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120006
Source
Heart. 2013 Jan;99(1):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Silje K Namtvedt
Jonny Hisdal
Anna Randby
Stefan Agewall
Einar Stranden
Virend K Somers
Helge Røsjø
Torbjørn Omland
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Lorenskog, Norway.
Source
Heart. 2013 Jan;99(1):30-4
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Body mass index
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Polysomnography
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Regional Blood Flow
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - complications - physiopathology
Vasodilation - physiology
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obesity are both associated with endothelial dysfunction, which precedes the development of atherosclerosis. As obesity is highly prevalent in OSA, we wanted to test the hypothesis that OSA is associated with endothelial dysfunction independently of obesity.
Cross-sectional, population-based study.
Norwegian university hospital.
Seventy-one subjects (median age 44 years, 35% female) were recruited from a population-based study in Norway. Participants were categorised as obese (body mass index (BMI) =30 kg/m(2)), non-obese (BMI
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 2014 Jan;100(1):81-224014283
Comment In: Heart. 2014 Jan;100(1):8124006452
Comment In: Heart. 2013 Jul;99(13):968-923624486
Comment In: Heart. 2013 Jul;99(13):96923661637
PubMed ID
23048165 View in PubMed
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Intima-media complex of both the brachial artery and the common carotid artery are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with previous myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53227
Source
J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Stefan Agewall
Loghman Henareh
Tomas Jogestrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. stefan.agewall@kus.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):119-25
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brachial Artery - pathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Common - pathology - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - pathology - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Regression Analysis
Tunica Intima - pathology
Tunica Media - pathology
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Prospective trials have established intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and cardiac left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as predictors of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between intima-media complex of the brachial artery to FMD, intima-media complex of the common carotid artery and cardiac hypertrophy in patients with coronary heart disease. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Cross-sectional design. Procedures were undertaken within the Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. A total of 123 patients with a previous acute myocardial infarction (MI) were investigated. Calculated intima-media area (cIMa) of the brachial and common carotid arteries and FMD of the brachial artery and left ventricular dimensions were examined. RESULTS: The brachial cIMa was significantly associated with age, p-triglycerides, common carotid cIMa, ejection fraction, septum thickness, posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass index (P
Notes
Comment In: J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):37-915643121
PubMed ID
15643133 View in PubMed
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Relationship between oxidized LDL, IgM, and IgG autoantibodies to ox-LDL levels with recurrent cardiovascular events in Swedish patients with previous myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259104
Source
Angiology. 2014 Nov;65(10):932-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
M. Crisby
L. Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Source
Angiology. 2014 Nov;65(10):932-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autoantibodies - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Malondialdehyde - blood
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood
Recurrence
Sweden
Abstract
We determined whether plasma levels of circulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL; E06), immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and IgM autoantibodies binding to malonyldialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) may predict cardiovascular events (CVEs). Patients (n=123) with a previous myocardial infarction (MI) were included. The primary end point was defined as any of the following: cardiovascular death from any cause, nonfatal reinfarction or stroke, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, and hospitalization due to angina pectoris. There were 43 CVEs during the follow-up period of 8.4±3.5 years. There was no significant difference in the levels of E06 and MDA-LDL IgG between the CVE and the event-free group. However, MDA-LDL IgM levels were significantly lower in patients in the CVE group (9524±6326 relative light unit [RLU]) compared with the event-free (10,975±5398 RLU) group (P=.04). In conclusion, levels of MDA-LDL IgM were associated with an increased risk of CVE in patients with a previous MI.
PubMed ID
24288363 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries and myocarditis compared with myocardial infarction with coronary artery stenosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128300
Source
Angiology. 2012 Oct;63(7):500-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Stefan Agewall
M. Daniel
L. Eurenius
C. Ekenbäck
M. Skeppholm
K. Malmqvist
C. Hofman-Bang
O. Collste
M. Frick
L. Henareh
T. Jernberg
P. Tornvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, Oslo University, Norway. stefan.agewall@medisin.uio.no
Source
Angiology. 2012 Oct;63(7):500-3
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Coronary Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis, Differential
Echocardiography
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Microvascular Angina - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology
Myocarditis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Risk factors
Sweden
Troponin - blood
Abstract
The interest and awareness of myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries (MINCA) have increased recently due to the frequent use of coronary angiography, the description of Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy, and new sensitive troponin analyses. The prevalence of MINCA in all patients with myocardial infarction (MI) was registered during a 3-month period in the Stockholm metropolitan area in Sweden. The results showed that MINCA is more common than previously thought (7%) and affecting one third of every woman with MI. Patients with myocarditis were younger and more often presented with signs of inflammation such as elevated C-reactive protein and fever. Myocarditis constitutes an important differential diagnosis for coronary artery disease. There is a need for larger studies of MINCA, including investigation with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, to establish prevalence and pathological process in this important subgroup of MI.
Notes
Comment In: Angiology. 2013 Apr;64(3):24423460455
Comment In: Angiology. 2013 Apr;64(3):245-623299173
PubMed ID
22210737 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.