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A 10-year trend of insomnia prevalence in the adult Norwegian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257604
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Feb;15(2):173-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ståle Pallesen
Børge Sivertsen
Inger Hilde Nordhus
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7807, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Jonas Lies vei 65, 5021 Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: staale.pallesen@psysp.uib.no.
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Feb;15(2):173-9
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the 10-year trend in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms, insomnia cases, and use of hypnotic agents in the adult Norwegian population.
Data from two representative surveys assessing identical insomnia symptoms in the adult population of Norway, one conducted in 1999-2000 (N=2001) and one conducted in 2009-2010 (N=2000), were compared.
Controlling for basic demographic variables, significant increases were found over the 10-year study period in the prevalence of sleep-onset insomnia from 13.1% to 15.2%, dissatisfaction with sleep from 8.2% to 13.6%, daytime impairment from 14.8% to 18.8%, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) insomnia cases from 11.9% to 15.5%, and hypnotic agent use from 6.9% to 11.1%. No secular trend was found for maintenance insomnia or for early morning awakening insomnia. Across the two surveys, women reported a higher prevalence of insomnia than men. Age was positively associated with the prevalence of nocturnal sleep problems and use of hypnotic agents but was inversely associated with daytime impairment. Individuals with low socioeconomic status (SES) reported a higher prevalence of several insomnia symptoms.
Insomnia seems to be on the rise in the general adult population, which gives reason for concern. Prevention of insomnia and cost-effective interventions should receive higher priority in the future.
PubMed ID
24382513 View in PubMed
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Aggression Is Associated With Increased Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use Contemplation Among Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291657
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2016 09 18; 51(11):1462-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-18-2016
Author
Dominic Sagoe
Rune A Mentzoni
Daniel Hanss
Ståle Pallesen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Psychosocial Science , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2016 09 18; 51(11):1462-9
Date
09-18-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression
Anabolic Agents
Female
Humans
Norway
Prevalence
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
We investigated the relationship between aggression and anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use intent among adolescents. A nationally representative sample of Norwegian 18-year-olds (N = 1,334, females = 58.7%) took part in a survey in 2013 (response rate = 64.9%). Participants completed the physical and verbal subscales of the Short-Form Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Intent to use AAS Scale, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. They also provided demographic information and answered questions about AAS use, gambling participation, as well as cigarette and snus use. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression were used to analyze the data. Lifetime and past year prevalence of AAS use was 0.1%. Between 0.4% and 1.7% of participants disclosed intent to use while between 1.1% and 2.5% expressed neutral intent to initiate AAS use. Compared to persons low on aggression, individuals high on aggression were more likely to report intent and curiosity towards initiating AAS use. Our findings indicate that aggression is a risk factor for AAS use contemplation among adolescents.
PubMed ID
27356242 View in PubMed
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The association between insomnia and bedroom habits and bedroom characteristics: an exploratory cross-sectional study of a representative sample of adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296982
Source
Sleep Health. 2018 04; 4(2):188-193
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Siri Waage
Ståle Pallesen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.; Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway.. Electronic address: bjorn.bjorvatn@uib.no.
Source
Sleep Health. 2018 04; 4(2):188-193
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Beds
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Major age and sex differences are reported in bedroom habits and bedroom characteristics. However, few studies have investigated whether such bedroom habits and characteristics differ between patients with chronic insomnia disorder and good sleepers.
We assessed the association between several bedroom habits (i.e. electronic media use, bed sharing) and bedroom characteristics (i.e. bedroom temperature, blackout curtains) and chronic insomnia disorder among 1001 randomly selected adults responding to a telephone survey in Norway. Response rate was 63%. Insomnia symptoms were evaluated with the validated Bergen Insomnia Scale (with ICSD-3/DSM-5 criteria).
Chronic insomnia disorder was associated with reporting worse bed comfort, having newer beds, more noise stemming from both within and outside the building, higher bedroom temperature during the summer, and not preferring the supine position when trying to sleep. However, we found no associations between chronic insomnia disorder and electronic media use in bed, reading in bed, how important the mattress, pillow and comforter were rated, bed sharing, bedroom temperature during winter, open or closed bedroom window, use of blackout curtains, and most self-reported preferred body positions for sleep.
We found few and small differences in bedroom habits and bedroom characteristics between respondents with and without chronic insomnia disorder. Future studies with experimental and longitudinal designs should investigate whether and how such habits and characteristics are causally and temporally linked to insomnia.
PubMed ID
29555133 View in PubMed
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Associations between night work and anxiety, depression, insomnia, sleepiness and fatigue in a sample of Norwegian nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108001
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e70228
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Nicolas M F Øyane
Ståle Pallesen
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Torbjörn Akerstedt
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. nicolas.oyane@gmail.com
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e70228
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self-Assessment
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Night work has been reported to be associated with various mental disorders and complaints. We investigated relationships between night work and anxiety, depression, insomnia, sleepiness and fatigue among Norwegian nurses.
The study design was cross-sectional, based on validated self-assessment questionnaires. A total of 5400 nurses were invited to participate in a health survey through the Norwegian Nurses' Organization, whereof 2059 agreed to participate (response rate 38.1%). Nurses completed a questionnaire containing items on demographic variables (gender, age, years of experience as a nurse, marital status and children living at home), work schedule, anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), insomnia (Bergen Insomnia Scale), sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale) and fatigue (Fatigue Questionnaire). They were also asked to report number of night shifts in the last 12 months (NNL). First, the parameters were compared between nurses i) never working nights, ii) currently working nights, and iii) previously working nights, using binary logistic regression analyses. Subsequently, a cumulative approach was used investigating associations between NNL with the continuous scores on the same dependent variables in hierarchical multiple regression analyses.
Nurses with current night work were more often categorized with insomnia (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.10-1.99) and chronic fatigue (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.02-3.11) than nurses with no night work experience. Previous night work experience was also associated with insomnia (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.04-2.02). NNL was not associated with any parameters in the regression analyses.
Nurses with current or previous night work reported more insomnia than nurses without any night work experience, and current night work was also associated with chronic fatigue. Anxiety, depression and sleepiness were not associated with night work, and no cumulative effect of night shifts during the last 12 months was found on any parameters.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23950914 View in PubMed
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Associations between night work and BMI, alcohol, smoking, caffeine and exercise--a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272476
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hogne Vikanes Buchvold
Ståle Pallesen
Nicolas M F Øyane
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1112
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sleep
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance
Young Adult
Abstract
Shift work is associated with negative health effects. Increased prevalence of several cardiovascular risk factors among shift workers/night workers compared with day workers have been shown resulting in increased risk of cardiovascular events among shift workers and night workers. Previous studies have taken a dichotomous approach to the comparison between day and night workers. The present study uses a continuous approach and provides such a new perspective to the negative effects of night work load as a possible risk factor for undesirable health effects.
This cross sectional study (The SUrvey of Shift work, Sleep and Health (SUSSH)) uses data collected from December 2008 to March 2009. The study population consists of Norwegian nurses. The study collected information about demographic and lifestyle factors: Body Mass Index (BMI), smoking habits, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption and exercise habits. The lifestyle parameters were evaluated using multiple hierarchical regression and binary logistic regression. Number of night shifts worked last year (NNL) was used as operationalization of night work load. Adjustment for possible confounders were made. Obesity was defined as BMI > 30. Alcohol Consumption was evaluated using the short form of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption (AUDIT-C). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22.
We had data from 2059 nurses. NNL was significantly and positively associated with BMI, both when evaluated against BMI as a continuous parameter (Beta = .055, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26558686 View in PubMed
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Associations between seasonal variations in day length (photoperiod), sleep timing, sleep quality and mood: a comparison between Ghana (5°) and Norway (69°).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129750
Source
J Sleep Res. 2012 Apr;21(2):176-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Oddgeir Friborg
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Benjamin Amponsah
Ståle Pallesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. oddgeir.friborg@uit.no
Source
J Sleep Res. 2012 Apr;21(2):176-84
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Anxiety - physiopathology
Climate
Depression - physiopathology
Female
Ghana - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Photoperiod
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sleep - physiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The hypothesis of whether day length (photoperiod) is an important zeitgeber (time-giver) for keeping the circadian rhythm entrained to a 24-hour cycle was examined, as was its association with sleep patterns and mood problems. Data were collected prospectively from a site with very large differences in daylight duration across seasons (Troms? in Norway, 69?39'N) and a site with very small seasonal differences in daylight duration (Ghana in Accra, 5?32'N). Two hundred subjects were recruited from both sites in January. At the follow-up in August, 180 and 150 subjects in Ghana and Norway participated, respectively. Use of a weekly sleep diary indicated low to moderately strong seasonal changes in rise- and bedtime, sleep efficiency and sleep onset latency only in the northern latitude. No seasonal changes in sleep duration or night awakenings were observed. The self-report measures indicated moderate to strong seasonal differences in insomnia and fatigue, and weaker differences in depressed mood in Norway, but small to non-existing seasonal differences in Ghana. Lack of daylight was related to phase-delayed rise- and bedtimes, increased problems falling asleep, daytime fatigue and depressive mood. However, total sleep duration and sleep quality appeared unaffected.
PubMed ID
22074234 View in PubMed
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The bidirectional association between depression and insomnia: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121774
Source
Psychosom Med. 2012 Sep;74(7):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Børge Sivertsen
Paula Salo
Arnstein Mykletun
Mari Hysing
Ståle Pallesen
Steinar Krokstad
Inger Hilde Nordhus
Simon Øverland
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Christiesgt 13, 5020 Bergen, Norway. borge.sivertsen@fhi.no
Source
Psychosom Med. 2012 Sep;74(7):758-65
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Depression and insomnia are closely linked, yet our understanding of their prospective relationships remains limited. The aim of the current study was to investigate the directionality of association between depression and insomnia.
Data were collected from a prospective population-based study comprising the most recent waves of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) (the HUNT2 in 1995-1997 and the HUNT3 in 2006-2008). A total of 24,715 persons provided valid responses on the relevant questionnaires from both surveys. Study outcomes were onset of depression or insomnia at HUNT3 in persons not reporting the other disorder in HUNT2.
Both insomnia and depression significantly predicted the onset of the other disorder. Participants who did not have depression in HUNT2 but who had insomnia in both HUNT2 and HUNT3 had an odds ratio (OR) of 6.2 of developing depression at HUNT3. Participants who did not have insomnia in HUNT2 but who had depression in both HUNT2 and HUNT3 had an OR of 6.7 of developing insomnia at HUNT3. ORs were only slightly attenuated when adjusting for potential confounding factors.
The results support a bidirectional relationship between insomnia and depression. This finding stands in contrast to the previous studies, which have mainly focused on insomnia as a risk factor for the onset of depression.
PubMed ID
22879427 View in PubMed
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Brief report: Behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome in older adolescents: Prevalence and correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97637
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Mar 18;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-2010
Author
Ståle Pallesen
Ingvild West Saxvig
Helge Molde
Eli Sørensen
Ane Wilhelmsen-Langeland
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Christiesgt. 12, 5015 Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Mar 18;
Date
Mar-18-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of "behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome (BIISS)" which is a newly defined hypersomnia, among adolescents. BIISS is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, short habitual sleep duration and sleeping considerably longer than usual during weekend/vacations. The study was conducted in the Hordaland County, Norway using a cluster sampling procedure. In all, 1285 high school students (aged 16-19 years) participated by completing self-report questionnaires on a computer. The estimated prevalence of BIISS was 10.4%. The results from logistic regression analyses showed that use of alcohol and living in an urban area were positively related to BIISS, whereas a high level of education in mothers was negatively related to BIISS. BIISS was associated with poor grades and symptoms of anxiety and depression.
PubMed ID
20303581 View in PubMed
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A controlled study of the effect of cognitive-behavioural group therapy for pathological gamblers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154362
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):22-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Helga Myrseth
Irene Litlerè
Inge Jarl Støylen
Ståle Pallesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Norway. Helga.Myrseth@psysp.uib.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):22-31
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cognitive Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
As the number of pathological gamblers has increased recently, the need for effective treatment has become more evident. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a short-term cognitive-behavioural group therapy programme for pathological gamblers. Fourteen subjects (three females and 11 males), who met the criteria for pathological gambling in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV, were randomly assigned to a Treatment Group (n=7) or a waiting list Control Group (n=7). An experimental design with three repeated measures was used (pre-treatment, post-treatment/post-waiting list and follow-up). The dependent variables were DSM-IV Criteria for Pathological Gambling, Money Spent on Gambling During the Last Week and Gamblers Inventory of Negative Consequences. The Treatment Group improved on the DSM-IV Criteria for Pathological Gambling, but did not show a significant improvement on Money Spent on Gambling During the Last week from pre-treatment to post-treatment. Combining both groups at 3-months follow-up, there was a significant improvement on all three variables from pre-treatment to follow-up. The results of this controlled study indicate that a short-term cognitive-behavioural group treatment for pathological gamblers had an effect.
PubMed ID
18991158 View in PubMed
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Core and peripheral criteria of video game addiction in the game addiction scale for adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268258
Source
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2015 May;18(5):280-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Geir Scott Brunborg
Daniel Hanss
Rune Aune Mentzoni
Ståle Pallesen
Source
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2015 May;18(5):280-5
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Behavior, Addictive - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Translating
Video Games - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment of video game addiction often involves measurement of peripheral criteria that indicate high engagement with games, and core criteria that indicate problematic use of games. A survey of the Norwegian population aged 16-74 years (N=10,081, response rate 43.6%) was carried out in 2013, which included the Gaming Addiction Scale for Adolescents (GAS). Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a two-factor structure, which separated peripheral criteria from core criteria, fitted the data better (CFI=0.963; RMSEA=0.058) compared to the original one-factor solution where all items are determined to load only on one factor (CFI=0.905, RMSEA=0.089). This was also found when we analyzed men aged =33 years, men aged >33 years, women aged =33 years, and women aged >33 years separately. This indicates that the GAS measures both engagement and problems related to video games. Multi-group measurement invariance testing showed that the factor structure was valid in all four groups (configural invariance) for the two-factor structure but not for the one-factor structure. A novel approach to categorization of problem gamers and addicted gamers where only the core criteria items are used (the CORE 4 approach) was compared to the approach where all items are included (the GAS 7 approach). The current results suggest that the CORE 4 approach might be more appropriate for classification of problem gamers and addicted gamers compared to the GAS 7 approach.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25826043 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.