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10 records – page 1 of 1.

An interactional perspective on the relationship of immigration to intimate partner violence in a representative sample of help-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100662
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Oct;25(10):1815-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Solveig Karin Bø Vatnar
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway. solveig.vatnar@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Oct;25(10):1815-35
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Guilt
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Questionnaires
Sexual Partners
Shame
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
This article reports a study of the possible impact of immigration on interactional aspects of intimate partner violence (IPV) among help-seeking women. Are there differences concerning (a) IPV categories, (b) IPV severity, frequency, duration, regularity, and predictability, (c) guilt and shame, (d) partners' ethnicity, and (e) children being exposed to interparental IPV, adjusted for sociodemographic variables? A representative sample of IPV help-seeking women (N = 157) recruited from family counseling, police, and shelters in Norway were interviewed. Multivariate analyses showed that immigrant women had lower income, were less likely to use alcohol and had increased likelihood of having an immigrant partner. No differences were found concerning IPV severity, frequency, guilt, shame, or victimization pertaining to different IPV categories. Immigrant women were better at predicting physical IPV but had an increased risk of physical injury related to sexual IPV. Children's risk of being exposed to interparental IPV increased if parents were immigrants. Psychosocial consequences of being an immigrant such as having a lower sociodemographic rank rather than IPV aspects constituted the main difference between ethnic Norwegian and immigrant help-seeking women.
PubMed ID
20040712 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257621
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;215(1):127-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2014
Author
Maria Knutzen
Stål Bjørkly
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Nina Helen Mjøsund
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Research and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, P.O.Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;215(1):127-33
Date
Jan-30-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Registries
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.
PubMed ID
24230996 View in PubMed
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Concurrent validity and clinical utility of the HCR-20V3 compared with the HCR-20 in forensic mental health nursing: similar tools but improved method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264821
Source
J Forensic Nurs. 2014 Oct-Dec;10(4):234-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stål Bjørkly
Gunnar Eidhammer
Lars Erik Selmer
Source
J Forensic Nurs. 2014 Oct-Dec;10(4):234-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Forensic Nursing
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Norway
Psychiatric Nursing
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk Management
Violence - psychology
Abstract
The main scope of this small-scale investigation was to compare clinical application of the HCR-20V3 with its predecessor, the HCR-20. To explore concurrent validity, two experienced nurses assessed 20 forensic mental health service patients with the tools. Estimates of internal consistency for the HCR-20 and the HCR-20V3 were calculated by Cronbach's alpha for two levels of measurement: the H-, C-, and R-scales and the total sum scores. We found moderate (C-scale) to good (H- and R- scales and aggregate scores) estimates of internal consistency and significant differences for the two versions of the HCR. This finding indicates that the two versions reflect common underlying dimensions and that there still appears to be differences between V2 and V3 ratings for the same patients. A case from forensic mental health was used to illustrate similarities and differences in assessment results between the two HCR-20 versions. The case illustration depicts clinical use of the HCR-20V3 and application of two structured nursing interventions pertaining to the risk management part of the tool. According to our experience, Version 3 is superior to Version 2 concerning: (a) item clarity; (b) the distinction between presence and relevance of risk factors; (c) the integration of risk formulation and risk scenario; and (d) the explicit demand to construct a risk management plan as part of the standard assessment procedure.
PubMed ID
25411814 View in PubMed
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Does it make any difference if she is a mother? An interactional perspective on intimate partner violence with a focus on motherhood and pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99054
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Jan;25(1):94-110
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Solveig Karin Bø Vatnar
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. solveig.vatnar@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2010 Jan;25(1):94-110
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors report on the impact of motherhood and pregnancy on interactional aspects of intimate partner violence (IPV) among help-seeking women. Is having children a protective or a risk factor for IPV severity, injury, duration, frequency, and mortal danger, controlling for sociodemographics? Regarding interactional aspects of IPV, do survivors who experience IPV during pregnancy differ from those who do not? Is IPV during pregnancy characterized by different severity, injury, frequency, and mortal danger? A representative sample of women was interviewed. Motherhood increased the risk for longer duration of physical, psychological, and sexual IPV, even controlling for duration of partnership. Combinations of main categories of IPV during pregnancy were different from when not pregnant. Duration of physical and psychological IPV was the only variable increasing the likelihood of experiencing IPV during pregnancy. All physical IPV variables were significantly lower during pregnancy. For psychological IPV, all variables but frequency were lower. Only mortal danger was significantly lower in the sexual IPV main category.
PubMed ID
19150888 View in PubMed
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Lethal intimate partner violence: an interactional perspective on women's perceptions of lethal incidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105518
Source
Violence Vict. 2013;28(5):772-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Solveig Karin Bø Vatnar
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. solveig.vatnar@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Violence Vict. 2013;28(5):772-89
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Social Support
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
Intimate partner homicide (IPH) is the only lethal violence in which women are the principal victims. This research reports on an investigation of possible differences between dynamics of lethal and nonlethal intimate partner violence (IPV). A representative sample of 157 help-seeking female victims of IPV in Norway was interviewed. Results from multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that women who perceived they had been subjected to lethal IPV were different from those who had not perceived the IPV as lethal concerning interactional dimensions of IPV and in their help-seeking responses. There was no difference related to sociodemographic factors. Because some IPV help-seeking women may be at a heightened risk for lethal violence, it is imperative that their efforts to seek assistance are responded to with care and structured risk assessment.
PubMed ID
24364122 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118336
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2013 Aug 30;209(1):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2013
Author
Maria Knutzen
Stål Bjørkly
Gunnar Eidhammer
Steinar Lorentzen
Nina Helen Mjøsund
Stein Opjordsmoen
Leiv Sandvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. maria.knutzen@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2013 Aug 30;209(1):91-7
Date
Aug-30-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Restraint, Physical
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.
PubMed ID
23219102 View in PubMed
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A prospective study of lipids and serotonin as risk markers of violence and self-harm in acute psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141118
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Apr 30;186(2-3):293-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2011
Author
John O Roaldset
Anne M Bakken
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Aalesund Hospital, Psychiatric Department, 6025 Aalesund, Norway. johnolr@gmail.com
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2011 Apr 30;186(2-3):293-9
Date
Apr-30-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Lipids - blood
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Discharge - standards
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Serotonin - metabolism
Time Factors
Violence
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies have reported an association between lipids and serotonin levels and aggression, but a literature search revealed a paucity of prospective studies. Subjects of the present naturalistic study were 254 of all (489) involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients to a psychiatric hospital during 1year. Serum lipids and platelet serotonin at admission were prospectively compared with recorded intra-institutional and 1-year post-discharge violence and self-harm. Total cholesterol had a significant negative relationship to inpatient suicidal behaviour and inpatient violent behaviour and to 3-month post-discharge violent behaviour. Triglycerides were a significant marker of inpatient self-mutilation and of self-mutilation in combination with suicidal behaviour at 3 and 12 months of follow-up. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) had a significant negative relationship to violence at 12-months, and to repeated violence in seven patients with two or more admissions. The post-discharge relationships between total cholesterol and violence and between triglycerides and self-harm remained significant even when controlling for other possible explanatory variables in a multivariate model. Results did not change after controlling for current medication at admission. There was no association between platelet serotonin and violence or self-harm. Future research may examine if lipid measurements add incremental validity to established clinical risk assessment procedures of violent and self-harm behaviour.
PubMed ID
20807666 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychometric properties and predictive validity of a police version of a violence risk screen - A pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294344
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Sep - Oct; 54:133-139
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Author
John O Roaldset
Pål Hartvig
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Ålesund Hospital, Psychiatric Department, Box 1600, 6026 Ålesund, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Centre of Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Box 4956, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway; Department of Mental Health, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Box 8905, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: john.olav.roaldset@ntnu.no.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Sep - Oct; 54:133-139
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Checklist - instrumentation
Criminals - psychology
Female
Humans
Law Enforcement
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Norway
Pilot Projects
Police
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Risk Assessment - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis
Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The Violence Risk Screening - Police Version (V-RISK-POL) is a seven-item screening tool for use at police stations by police officers and law enforcement officials to assist in the process of decision making regarding release, restrictive measures or arrest for apprehended individuals where the risk of future violence must be considered. The screen is based on the V-RISK-10, originally developed for emergency psychiatry. We examined psychometric properties and the prospective predictive validity of future violent convictions for the V-RISK-POL in a sample of 111 persons arrested for suspicion of violent crimes. Seventeen persons were convicted for a new violent crime committed during the 24-40months follow-up. The V-RISK-POL demonstrated good internal consistency; Cronbach's alpha=0.81 (95% CI=0.75-0.86) and moderate predictive validity; the area under the curve of the receiving operator characteristics (AUC)=0.753 (95% CI=0.644-0.843). Further research on larger and more heterogeneous samples is necessary to examine whether the screen may be useful in the police context.
PubMed ID
28668227 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259887
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Johannes Langeveld
Stål Bjørkly
Bjørn Auestad
Helene Barder
Julie Evensen
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Tor Ketil Larsen
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Vaglum
Thomas McGlashan
Svein Friis
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Crime
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis.
To assess the prevalence of criminal and violent behaviors during a 10-year follow-up period after the debut of a first psychosis episode, and to identify early predictors and concomitant risk factors of violent behavior.
A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of criminal behavior, drug abuse, clinical, social and treatment variables at baseline, five, and 10-year follow-up. Additionally, threatening and violent behavior was assessed at 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=178) was studied.
During the 10-year follow-up period, 20% of subjects had been apprehended or incarcerated. At 10-year follow-up, 15% of subjects had exposed others to threats or violence during the year before assessment. Illegal drug use at baseline and five-year follow-up, and a longer duration of psychotic symptoms were found to be predictive of violent behavior during the year preceding the 10-year follow-up.
After treatment initiation, the overall prevalence of violence in psychotic patients drops gradually to rates close to those of the general population. However, persistent illicit drug abuse is a serious risk factor for violent behavior, even long after the start of treatment. Achieving remission early and reducing substance abuse may contribute to a lower long-term risk for violent behavior in FEP patients.
PubMed ID
24837683 View in PubMed
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Victim of and witness to violence: an interactional perspective on mothers' perceptions of children exposed to intimate partner violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127506
Source
Violence Vict. 2011;26(6):830-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Solveig Karin Bø Vatnar
Stål Bjørkly
Author Affiliation
Center for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Olso, Norway. solveig.vatnar@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Violence Vict. 2011;26(6):830-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article reports a study of how mothers perceive the effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy and children's exposure to IPV: (a) Do interactional aspects of IPV have a negative impact on the fetus during pregnancy or on the newborn baby? and (b) Is there a relationship between interactional aspects of IPV and (a) children's risk of being exposed to IPV and (b) the age of the child when at risk for exposure to IPV? A representative sample of 137 IPV help-seeking mothers in Norway was interviewed. Severity of physical IPV and injury from sexual IPV increased the risk of consequences to the fetus. Frequency of physical and psychological IPV increased the likelihood of children's exposure. Duration of the partnership increased the risk of children's exposure to physical and sexual IPV. Finally, there was a negative linear association between children's age when exposed for the first time and frequency of physical and psychological IPV.
PubMed ID
22288099 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.