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The association between depressive and anxiety symptoms and bone mineral density in the general population: the HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138090
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lana J Williams
Ottar Bjerkeset
Arnulf Langhammer
Michael Berk
Julie A Pasco
Margaret J Henry
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Author Affiliation
University of Melbourne, Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, Geelong, Australia. lanaw@barwonhealth.org.au
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):164-71
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - complications - physiopathology
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - etiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
Psychiatric disorders may be risk factors for reduced bone mineral density (BMD). Longitudinal evidence is limited and this is yet to be examined among community-dwelling adults with anxiety. We aimed to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between anxiety and depressive symptoms and BMD.
This study examined data from the second Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997; 1194 men and 7842 women) and a follow-up conducted in 2001 (697 men and 2751 women). Symptomatology was ascertained using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and BMD was measured at the forearm using single-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Information on medication use and lifestyle was self-reported, and these, together with anthropometric measures were tested in multivariate analyses.
In men, adjusted BMD was 2.6% lower at the ultradistal forearm for those with depressive symptoms and 2.6% lower at the ultradistal and 2.0% lower at the distal forearm for those with anxiety symptoms. In women, adjusted BMD at the distal and ultradistal forearm was lower for heavier women with depressive symptoms but this relationship diminished with decreasing weight. Forearm BMD was similar for women with or without anxiety symptoms. Longitudinally, neither depressive nor anxiety symptoms were associated with bone loss over 4.6 years.
Findings cannot be generalised to other skeletal sites and a longer follow-up period may be necessary to detect differences in bone loss.
These results indicate that depressive and anxiety symptoms are cross-sectionally associated with reduced BMD. These findings provide further evidence to support monitoring BMD in individuals diagnosed with psychiatric illness.
PubMed ID
21211851 View in PubMed
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The association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in healthy premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49682
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Liv Berit Augestad
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
W Dana Flanders
Author Affiliation
Program for Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.berit.augestad@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forearm
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Radius - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the association between recreational and occupational physical activity and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy premenopausal women. METHODS: During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted among women and men aged >19 years in Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway. The second, follow-up survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997. The subjects in this study consist of healthy premenopausal women (n = 1396)
PubMed ID
15130259 View in PubMed
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Bone mass density, fracture history, self-reported osteoporosis as proxy variables for estrogen and the risk of non-small-cell lung cancer--a population based cohort study, the HUNT study: are proxy variables friends or faults?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114371
Source
Lung Cancer. 2013 Jul;81(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Peter Hatlen
Arnulf Langhammer
Siri Forsmo
Sven M Carlsen
Tore Amundsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital HF, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. Peter.Hatlen@ntnu.no
Source
Lung Cancer. 2013 Jul;81(1):39-46
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Bone Density
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Fractures, Bone - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Diseases - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Self Report
Abstract
Lung cancer has the highest mortality of all cancers. Patients with early stage disease have the best cure rates and that emphasizes the importance of early detection. About half of all non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are estrogen receptor positive. The impact of estrogen and its receptors for NSCLC carcinogenesis has been studied but is still unclear. Low estrogen levels are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesize that low bone mineral density (BMD), a positive history of fracture or self-reported osteoporosis, used as a proxy variable for life time estrogen exposure, are associated with a low incidence of NSCLC. We analyzed data from a cohort study, the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 2 (1995-1997) linked to the Norwegian Cancer Registry. Using the logistic regression model we calculated the odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for the risk of NSCLC for the three proxy variables, stratified by sex. Participants older than 50 years of age, having measured bone density (N = 18,156), having answered the questions on self-reported fracture (N = 37,883) and osteoporosis (N = 25,701) and known body mass index (BMI) (N = 29,291), were evaluated for inclusion. In 6996 participants all these information was available in addition to tobacco use, and in women also hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). Lung function (FEV1 percent of predicted) was included in a sensitivity analysis. We identified 132 (1.9%) cases of NSCLC, 59 (1.2%) and 73 (3.3%) cases in women and men, respectively. Low BMD was associated with a higher risk of NSCLC, OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.09-5.18 and OR: 2.67, 95% CI: 1.39-5.16 in women and men, respectively. No association was found between the two other proxy variables and the risk of NSCLC. Inclusion of lung function in the model did not change the results. Contrary to our hypothesis, women and men with low BMD had a higher risk for NSCLC. In addition the study demonstrates that the risk depends on which proxy variable was chosen, and we may ask: are proxy variables reliable?
PubMed ID
23618654 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: Norwegian Epidemiologic Osteoporosis Studies (NOREPOS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261800
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Dec;42(8):804-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Haakon E Meyer
Nina Emaus
Guri Grimnes
Clara Gram Gjesdal
Siri Forsmo
Berit Schei
Grethe S Tell
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Dec;42(8):804-13
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper describes the history, purpose, data collection and contributions in the research collaboration Norwegian Osteoporosis Epidemiologic Studies (NOREPOS).
NOREPOS encompasses almost 85,000 bone mineral density measurements within Cohort of Norway and data on almost 140,000 hip fractures in Norway 1994-2008. Included are anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, lipids and glucose, and 50 standard questions on sociodemographic factors, diseases and risk factors. Blood samples/DNA are stored. The main research question posed in NOREPOS is why hip fracture rates in Norway are the highest in the world. Data on hip fractures 2009-2013 will be added in 2014.
Main findings include: Every hour a Norwegian suffers a hip fracture; hip fracture incidence rates declined after 1999; only 16% of patients used anti-osteoporosis drugs 1 year after hip fracture; 25% of patients died within 1 year after the fracture; 12% suffered a new hip fracture within 10 years; rural dwellers had lower hip and forearm fracture incidence than city dwellers; magnesium in tap water may be protective whereas bacterial contamination, cadmium and lead may be harmful to bone health; low serum vitamin D and E levels were associated with higher hip fracture risk; vitamin A was not associated with fracture risk; and abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture when BMI was accounted for.
NOREPOS encompasses a unique source of information for aetiological research, genetic studies as well as for biomarkers of osteoporosis and fractures. Because of the increasing number of elderly people in Europe, hip fractures will continue to pose an international public health and health care challenge.
PubMed ID
25278275 View in PubMed
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Correlates of forearm bone mineral density in young Norwegian women: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9922
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2002
Author
Gillian A Hawker
Siri Forsmo
Suzanne M Cadarette
Berit Schei
Susan B Jaglal
Lisa Forsén
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Women's College Ambulatory Care Centre, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. g.hawker@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):418-27
Date
Sep-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway
Osteoporosis - etiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Maximizing attainment of optimal peak bone mineral density (BMD) is a potential osteoporosis prevention strategy. The main objective of this study was to identify correlates of forearm BMD in young adult women. Population-based data derived from standardized questionnaires administered to healthy women aged 19-35 years in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway (n = 963), were collected in 1995-1997. Forearm BMD was assessed by single x-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine correlates of BMD (g/cm(2)) and lowest quintile of BMD, respectively, at the ultradistal and distal sites. The mean age and weight of the cohort were 29.7 years (standard deviation 4.7) and 68.6 kg (standard deviation 12.5), respectively. Age and weight were positively associated with BMD at both forearm sites. When data were controlled for age and weight, later age at menarche and lack of milk consumption were associated with lower BMD values. In both linear models and logistic models, none of the factors vitamin D intake, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, amenorrhea, oral contraceptive use, number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, and family history of osteoporosis were found to be significantly associated with BMD. Prior studies have suggested that calcium supplementation in children is useful for optimizing peak BMD. Further studies exploring the relation between lifestyle factors and BMD are warranted to search for ways to maximize attainment of peak BMD.
PubMed ID
12196311 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic labelling influences self-rated health. A prospective cohort study: the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273914
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Oct;32(5):492-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Pål Jørgensen
Arnulf Langhammer
Steinar Krokstad
Siri Forsmo
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Oct;32(5):492-9
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - psychology
Hypothyroidism - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have shown an independent association between poor self-rated health (SRH) and increased mortality. Few studies, however, have investigated any possible impact on SRH of diagnostic labelling.
To test whether SRH differed in persons with known and unknown hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus (DM) or hypertension, opposed to persons without these conditions, after 11-year follow-up.
Prospective population-based cohort study in North-Tr?ndelag County, Norway, HUNT2 (1995-97) to HUNT3 (2006-08). All inhabitants aged 20 years and older were invited. The response rate was 69.5% in HUNT2 and 54.1% in HUNT3. In total, 34144 persons aged 20-70 years were included in the study population. The outcome was poor SRH.
Persons with known disease had an increased odds ratio (OR) to report poor SRH at follow-up; figures ranging from 1.11 (0.68-1.79) to 2.52 (1.46-4.34) (men with hypothyroidism kept out owing to too few numbers). However, in persons not reporting, but having laboratory results indicating these diseases (unknown disease), no corresponding associations with SRH were found. Contrary, the OR for poor SRH in women with unknown hypothyroidism and unknown hypertension was 0.64 (0.38-1.06) and 0.89 (0.79-1.01), respectively.
Awareness opposed to ignorance of hypothyroidism, DM and hypertension seemed to be associated with poor perceived health, suggesting that diagnostic labelling could have a negative effect on SRH. This relationship needs to be tested more thoroughly in future research but should be kept in mind regarding the benefits of early diagnosing of diseases.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26240089 View in PubMed
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Does thyroid function influence fracture risk? Prospective data from the HUNT2 study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107290
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;169(6):845-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anders Svare
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Bjørn Olav Asvold
Siri Forsmo
Berit Schei
Trine Bjøro
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;169(6):845-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Density
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - blood - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Radius Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Thyroid Function Tests
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Thyrotropin - blood
Ulna Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
To prospectively study the relation between TSH and risk of hip and forearm fractures.
A population-based cohort study.
In a substudy of the second survey of the Nord Trøndelag Health Study, Norway (HUNT2, 1995-97), linked with a hospital-based fracture registry, we investigated the relation between baseline TSH and risk of hip and/or forearm fractures.
A total of 16?610 women and 8595 men aged 40 years or more, without previous self-reported thyroid disease and hip or forearm fractures.
During 12.5 years follow-up, a total of 1870 women and 342 men experienced hip or forearm fractures. Overall, there was no relation between baseline TSH and fracture risk. However, there was weak evidence that women with TSH 3.5?mU/l had a slightly increased risk of hip fractures (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, 95% CI 0.97-1.94 and HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.93-1.52) compared with the reference group with TSH of 1.5-2.4?mU/l. Supplementary analyses showed higher hip fracture risk in women with TSH >4.0?mU/l and negative thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) compared with the reference group (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.24-2.46).
We found no statistically significant relation between baseline TSH and subsequent fracture risk, but the data suggest a weak positive association with hip fracture risk among women with both low and high TSH. The latter association was confined to women with negative TPOAb status.
PubMed ID
24031093 View in PubMed
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[Do physicians experience spousal support in their medical career?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52101
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2296-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2003
Author
Wenche Østerlie
Siri Forsmo
Kristen Ringdal
Berit Schei
Olaf Gjerløw Aasland
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Medisinsk teknisk senter, Trondheim. wenche.osterlie@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2296-9
Date
Aug-28-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Conflict (Psychology)
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Life Style
Male
Marriage - psychology
Norway
Nuclear Family - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Physicians - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The professional life of physicians is characterised by long working days and pressure for efficiency. Family life represents an arena for developing other aspects of life. It is not well known to what extent physicians' spouses are supportive of the physician's total situation, or how gender, age, family or professional aspects influence this perception. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a nation-wide survey of the medical profession, 1594 male and 512 female physicians answered 12 attitude statements relating to work and family life. The responses were grouped by factor analysis into three dimensions: emotional support, instrumental support, and conflict. The statistical analysis for associations between social support and age, family and professional factors was performed separately for men and women in multivariate models. RESULTS: Physicians were generally satisfied with the support given by their spouses. Female physicians reported more emotional support; male physicians perceived or reported more practical support as well as more conflict. The experience of conflict was most pronounced among physicians aged 35-44 and among those reporting long working hours. The strongest positive association between social support and spouse's profession was found for spouses who were physicians themselves. INTERPRETATION: Experienced spousal support among Norwegian physicians is influenced by gender and various aspects of work and family life. Physicians with same-profession spouses expressed the greatest satisfaction with the support they received.
PubMed ID
14508560 View in PubMed
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Experiences of recall after mammography screening--a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130697
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2011 Nov;32(11):1009-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Marit Solbjør
Siri Forsmo
John-Arne Skolbekken
Ann Rudinow Sætnan
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Marit.Solbjor@ntnu.no
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2011 Nov;32(11):1009-27
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mammography - psychology
Mass Screening - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Women's health
Abstract
Women participating in biannual mammography screening for 20 years have a cumulative risk of 20% of being recalled. We conducted a prospective qualitative interview study with eight nonsymptomatic women recalled after mammography screening. These women expressed mixed emotions over being recalled. Information about recall rates and breast cancer risk was seen as alarming, and cancer risk estimates were seen by some as high. The short time between recall and examination was reassuring, but it was also perceived as an indication of malignancy. Despite distress from examinations, most of the women continued to want medical examinations to detect cancer early.
PubMed ID
21978146 View in PubMed
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Forearm bone mineral density in an unselected population of 2,779 men and women--the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51954
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):562-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
Lisa Forsen
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Medisinsk-teknisk senter, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. siri.forsmo@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 May;16(5):562-7
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Densitometry, X-Ray
Female
Forearm - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The fracture incidence in Norway is among the highest in Europe, presumably due to osteoporosis. As part of a multipurpose health study in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway (the HUNT study), a 5% randomly selected sample (n=4,646) of the population >19 years of age was invited to undergo single X-ray absorptiometry (SXA) of the forearm. A total of 1,274 men (50.5 years) and 1,505 women (49.9 years) participated (60%). The aim of the study was to describe the variation in bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalence of forearm BMD 2.5 standard deviations (SD) below the mean value for young adults in an unselected population sample. In women the BMD remained stable until the age of 50 years, whereupon a strong decline in BMD was observed. In men, a BMD increase was observed until about the age of 40 years; the decline after the age of 65 was, however, similar to that in women. Based on age and gender-specific reference values, the age-adjusted prevalence of T-scores
PubMed ID
15448986 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.