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Awareness and advocacy for adolescents and young adults with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134411
Source
Cancer. 2011 May 15;117(10 Suppl):2311-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2011
Author
Devon McGoldrick
Pamela Gordon
Myrna Whiteson
Heidi Adams
Paul Rogers
Simon Sutcliffe
Author Affiliation
LiveStrong, Austin, Texas 78702, USA. devon.mcgoldrick@livestrong.org
Source
Cancer. 2011 May 15;117(10 Suppl):2311-5
Date
May-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Priorities
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient Advocacy
Young Adult
Abstract
Increasing the awareness of the clinical and psychosocial needs that are particular to adolescents and young adults (AYA) was a top priority, as was strengthening advocacy efforts to empower and support this group. To date, AYA advocates had some success in generating public awareness and building a solid clinical justification for increased focus on this population. It had been established that the economic burden of their mortality was significant, their cancers were unusual, their medical care was often inadequate, and their outcomes for many cancers had not improved in the past 3 decades. As the awareness and advocacy campaign continued to grow and evolve across the globe, it was an important goal to integrate the efforts of all stakeholders to ensure that it progressed with a single, consensual, focused message identifying a common priority for action. By coordinating the efforts of the scientific, medical, and advocacy communities, it was possible to amplify their separate efforts and activities and more efficiently achieve large-scale change in the world of AYA oncology.
PubMed ID
21523751 View in PubMed
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Brief chemotherapy and involved-region irradiation for limited-stage diffuse large-cell lymphoma: an 18-year experience from the British Columbia Cancer Agency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192035
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2002 Jan 1;20(1):197-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2002
Author
Tamara N Shenkier
Nicholas Voss
Randall Fairey
Randy D Gascoyne
Paul Hoskins
Richard Klasa
Paul Klimo
Susan E O'Reilly
Simon Sutcliffe
Joseph M Connors
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, 600 W 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 4E6. tshenkier@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2002 Jan 1;20(1):197-204
Date
Jan-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Combined Modality Therapy
Disease-Free Survival
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lymphoma, B-Cell
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - drug therapy - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Lymphoma, T-Cell
Male
Middle Aged
Survival Rate
Survivors
Abstract
To evaluate clinical outcome of patients with limited-stage diffuse large-cell lymphoma (DLCL) treated with three cycles of chemotherapy followed by involved-region irradiation (IRRT).
Adults with limited-stage DLCL were treated with brief doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy regimens between 1980 and 1998. IRRT was administered 3 to 4 weeks after the third chemotherapy treatment in a dose equivalent to 30 Gy in 10 fractions.
Three hundred and eight patients (median age, 64 years) were included, and 299 experienced complete remission. After a median follow-up of 86 months, 64 patients developed progressive disease, and 104 patients died (43 from lymphoma, three from toxicity, and 58 from other causes). Actuarial overall and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were, respectively, 80% and 81% at 5 years and 63% and 74% at 10 years. For subgroups identified using the Miller modification of the International Prognostic Index (IPI), the overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 97% and 89% (no factors), 77% and 56% (one or two factors), and 58% and 48% (three or four factors), and the 5-year and 10-year PFS rates were, respectively, 94% and 89% (no factors), 79% and 73% (one or two factors), and 60% and 50% (three or four factors). Men with testicular presentation, had a definitely inferior outcome.
Long-term outcome with three cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and IRRT confirms that this is a successful approach for the majority of patients with limited-stage DLCL. Subgroups with worse prognoses can be identified, and these patients should be offered alternative treatment approaches.
PubMed ID
11773170 View in PubMed
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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Apr;74(3):207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Simon Sutcliffe
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Apr;74(3):207
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Humans
Mass Screening
Mouth Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Notes
Comment On: J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Apr;74(3):261-618387266
PubMed ID
18401900 View in PubMed
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Where there is a will, there is a way: networks as a means of cancer control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170908
Source
J Oncol Manag. 2005;14(4):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Martina N Strack
Barbara Poole
Frances Lasser
Simon Sutcliffe
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. tstrack@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Oncol Manag. 2005;14(4):20-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Oncology
National Health Programs
Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
A key challenge in cancer control is the need for translational research to link discovery research with improved health outcomes. In British Columbia, we have built upon the idea of communities of practice to develop networks that will meet our cancer-control mandate.
PubMed ID
16454115 View in PubMed
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