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Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134175
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Sigrid K Brækkan
Kristin F Enga
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological research group in Tromsø (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Wine
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming = 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of = 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (= 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21614415 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147924
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jan;30(1):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Knut H Borch
Sigrid K Braekkan
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Jan Størmer
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.no
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jan;30(1):121-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of various obesity measures on identification of subjects at risk and their respective risk estimates for VTE in a prospective population-based study.
Measures of body composition such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were registered in 6708 subjects aged 25 to 84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study (1994-1995). Incident VTE-events were registered during follow-up until September 1, 2007. There were 222 VTE-events during a median of 12.3 years of follow-up. All measures of obesity exhibited significantly increased HR for VTE in multivariable models with highest risk estimates for WC in both genders. The risk of VTE increased across quartiles of BMI, WC, and HC in both genders, but not for WHR. WC identified more subjects at risk using established criteria for obesity. WC had the highest area under the curve in both genders in ROC analysis, and WC above ROC-derived cut-off values (WC > or =85 cm in women and > or =95 cm in men) were associated with HRs of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.05 to 3.48) in women and 2.78 (95% CI: 1.47 to 5.27) in men.
Our findings indicate that WC is the preferable anthropometric measure of obesity to identify subjects at risk and to predict risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
19834110 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between red cell distribution width and venous thromboembolism is not explained by myocardial infarction, stroke, or cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293397
Source
Res Pract Thromb Haemost. 2018 Apr; 2(2):327-333
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Trygve S Ellingsen
Jostein Lappegård
Tove Skjelbakken
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
K.G. Jebsen Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center (TREC) Department of Clinical Medicine UiT-The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.
Source
Res Pract Thromb Haemost. 2018 Apr; 2(2):327-333
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a risk marker of venous thromboembolism (VTE), myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cancer. Due to interrelations between these diseases, the association between RDW and VTE may be explained by MI, stroke, or cancer.
To investigate whether the effect of RDW on VTE could be explained by intermediate development of MI, stroke, or cancer.
RDW was measured in 24 363 participants of the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995. Incident VTE, MI, stroke, and cancer were registered until December 31, 2010. Conventional and cause-specific Cox-regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for VTE with 95% confidence intervals (CI) across categories of RDW.
There were 502 first VTEs during a median follow-up of 16 years. In conventional Cox regression analysis, RDW in the highest quartile was associated with a 71% (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.09-2.67) and 27% (HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.88-1.85) higher risk of VTE in men and women, respectively, compared to subjects in the lowest quartiles. The risk of VTE among subjects with RDW in the highest quartile was similar for men and women of postmenopausal age. In cause-specific analysis, where each individual contributed with person-time until the first occurring event only, the risk estimates were similar to those of the conventional Cox-regression analysis.
Our findings suggest that the association between RDW and future risk of VTE is not explained by intermediate development of MI, stroke, or cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30046735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of mild to moderate chronic kidney disease with venous thromboembolism: pooled analysis of five prospective general population cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120717
Source
Circulation. 2012 Oct 16;126(16):1964-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-2012
Author
Bakhtawar K Mahmoodi
Ron T Gansevoort
Inger Anne Næss
Pamela L Lutsey
Sigrid K Brækkan
Nic J G M Veeger
Ellen E Brodin
Karina Meijer
Yingying Sang
Kunihiro Matsushita
Stein I Hallan
Jens Hammerstrøm
Suzanne C Cannegieter
Brad C Astor
Josef Coresh
Aaron R Folsom
John-Bjarne Hansen
Mary Cushman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Circulation. 2012 Oct 16;126(16):1964-71
Date
Oct-16-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - epidemiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Given the high prevalence of mild-to-moderate CKD in the general population, in depth analysis of this association is warranted.
We pooled individual participant data from 5 community-based cohorts from Europe (second Nord-Trøndelag Health Study [HUNT2], Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-stage Disease [PREVEND], and the Tromsø study) and the United States (Atherosclerosis Risks in Communities [ARIC] and Cardiovascular Health Study [CHS]) to assess the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria, and CKD with objectively verified VTE. To estimate adjusted hazard ratios for VTE, categorical and continuous spline models were fit by using Cox regression with shared-frailty or random-effect meta-analysis. A total of 1178 VTE events occurred over 599 453 person-years follow-up. Relative to eGFR 100 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), hazard ratios for VTE were 1.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.59) for eGFR 75, 1.31 (1.00-1.71) for eGFR 60, 1.82 (1.27-2.60) for eGFR 45, and 1.95 (1.26-3.01) for eGFR 30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). In comparison with an albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) of 5.0 mg/g, the hazard ratios for VTE were 1.34 (1.04-1.72) for ACR 30 mg/g, 1.60 (1.08-2.36) for ACR 300 mg/g, and 1.92 (1.19-3.09) for ACR 1000 mg/g. There was no interaction between clinical categories of eGFR and ACR (P=0.20). The adjusted hazard ratio for CKD, defined as eGFR
Notes
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PubMed ID
22977129 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Common and Rare Exonic Genetic Variants and Serum Levels of Twenty Cardiovascular-Related Proteins: The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273771
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2016 Jun 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-2016
Author
Terry Solomon
Erin N Smith
Hiroko Matsui
Sigrid K Braekkan
Tom Wilsgaard
Inger Njølstad
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
John-Bjarne Hansen
Kelly A Frazer
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2016 Jun 21;
Date
Jun-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
-Genetic variation can be used to study causal relationships between biomarkers and diseases. Here, we identify new common and rare genetic variants associated with cardiovascular-related protein levels (protein quantitative trait loci, pQTLs). We functionally annotate these pQTLs, predict and experimentally confirm a novel molecular interaction and determine which pQTLs are associated with diseases and physiological phenotypes.
-As part of a larger case/control study of VTE, serum levels of 51 proteins implicated in cardiovascular diseases were measured in 330 individuals from the Tromsø Study. Exonic genetic variation near each protein's respective gene (cis) was identified using sequencing and arrays. Using single site and gene-based tests, we identified 27 genetic associations between pQTLs and the serum levels of 20 proteins: 14 associated with common variation in cis, of which six are novel (i.e. not previously reported); seven associations with rare variants in cis, of which four are novel; and six associations in trans Of the 20 proteins, 15 were associated with single sites and seven with rare variants. cis-pQTLs for kallikrein and F12 also show trans associations for proteins (uPAR, kininogen) known to be cleaved by kallikrein as well as with NTproBNP. We experimentally demonstrate that kallikrein can cleave proBNP (NTproBNP precursor) in vitro Nine of the pQTLs have previously identified associations with 17 diseases and/or physiological phenotypes.
-We have identified cis and trans genetic variation associated with the serum levels of 20 proteins and utilized these pQTLs to study molecular mechanisms underlying diseases and/or physiological phenotypes.
PubMed ID
27329291 View in PubMed
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Associations between serum levels of calcium, parathyroid hormone and future risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281100
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2017 May;176(5):625-634
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Gunhild Lerstad
Ellen E Brodin
Johan Svartberg
Rolf Jorde
Jan Brox
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2017 May;176(5):625-634
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
The relationship between serum levels of calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been addressed in population-based cohorts. We investigated the associations between serum levels of calcium and PTH, with future risk of VTE in a general adult population.
Population-based cohort.
A total of 27 712 subjects (25-87 years) who participated in Tromsø 4 (1994-1995) and Tromsø 5 (2001-2002) surveys were included in the study, and total calcium and PTH were measured in 27 685 and 8547 subjects respectively. Incident VTE was recorded through December 31, 2012. Cox-regression models with calcium and PTH as time-varying exposures were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) of VTE by quartiles of calcium and PTH. Quartiles of calcium and PTH were also combined to assess the effect of discordants of both PTH and calcium (e.g. highest and lowest quartiles of both calcium and PTH) on VTE risk using the middle two quartiles as reference.
There were 712 VTEs during 15.0 years of median follow-up. Serum levels of calcium and PTH were not associated with risk of VTE. However, subjects with discordant high serum levels of both calcium and PTH (calcium =2.45?mmol/L and PTH =4.0?pmol/L) had increased risk of VTE compared to those in subjects with normal calcium and PTH (multivariable HR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.12-2.84).
Serum levels of calcium and PTH separately were not associated with future risk of VTE, but subjects with high levels of both calcium and PTH had increased risk of VTE compared to those in subjects with normal levels.
PubMed ID
28246149 View in PubMed
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Atrial Fibrillation and Cause-Specific Risks of Pulmonary Embolism and Ischemic Stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289402
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2018 Jan 29; 7(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-29-2018
Author
Erin M Hald
Ludvig B Rinde
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Tom Wilsgaard
Inger Njølstad
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, K. G. Jebsen Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway erin.mathiesen.hald@uit.no.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2018 Jan 29; 7(3):
Date
Jan-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-established risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS). Emerging evidence also indicates an association between AF and pulmonary embolism (PE). Because IS may potentially mediate the observed risk of PE in AF, we aimed to assess the impact of AF on the cause-specific risks of PE and IS in a large cohort recruited from the general population.
We observed 29 842 participants from 3 surveys of the Tromsø study (inclusion in 1994-1995, 2001-2002, and 2007-2008) to the end of 2012. Incident events of AF, IS, and PE during follow-up were recorded, and information on potential confounders was obtained at baseline. Cox regression models, with AF as a time-dependent variable, were used to calculate cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PE and IS. There were 2067 participants diagnosed as having AF, 296 with PE and 1164 with IS, during a median of 17.6 years of follow-up. The risks of PE (HR, 10.88; 95% CI, 6.23-18.89) and IS (HR, 6.16; 95% CI, 4.47-8.48) were substantially increased during the first 6 months after AF diagnosis, with crude incidence rates of 18.5 per 1000 person-years for PE and 52.8 per 1000 person-years for IS. The risk estimates remained elevated for both PE (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.10-2.71) and IS (HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 2.05-2.92) throughout the study period.
AF was associated with increased cause-specific risks of both PE and IS. Our findings infer that the risk of PE in AF is not explained by intermediate IS.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29378729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atrial fibrillation and future risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257483
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2014 Oct 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2014
Author
Kristin F Enga
Ina Rye-Holmboe
Erin M Hald
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Sigrid K Braekkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
K.G. Jebsen Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway; Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2014 Oct 21;
Date
Oct-21-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Whether atrial fibrillation is related to risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is not extensively studied. Therefore, we investigated the association between atrial fibrillation and future risk of VTE in a population-based cohort.
In total, 29 975 subjects were recruited from three surveys of the Tromsø study and followed from enrolment (1994-95, 2001-02 and 2007-08) through 2010. Incident events of atrial fibrillation and VTE during follow-up were recorded. Information on potential confounders was obtained at baseline. Cox-regression models with atrial fibrillation as time-dependent variable were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for VTE with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
During 16 years of median follow-up, 1604 subjects were diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and 614 with incident VTE. The risk of VTE was substantially increased during the first 6 months after diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (HR 8.44, 95% CI: 5.61-12.69), and remained increased throughout the study period (HR: 1.43, 95% CI 1.43-1.99) compared to those without atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation displayed higher risk estimates for pulmonary embolism (HR: 11.84, 6.80-20.63) than for deep vein thrombosis (HR: 6.20, 3.37-11.39), during the first 6 months, and was still associated with pulmonary embolism (HR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.24-3.10) but not with deep vein thrombosis (HR: 1.08, 95% CI: 0.66-1.75) more than 6 months after diagnosis.
Atrial fibrillation was associated with increased risk of VTE, and pulmonary embolism in particular. Our findings support the concept that isolated pulmonary embolism may originate from right atrial thrombi due to atrial fibrillation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
25330989 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, ischemic stroke, and all-cause mortality: The Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304921
Source
Res Pract Thromb Haemost. 2020 08; 4(6):1004-1012
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2020
Author
Erin Mathiesen Hald
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Tom Wilsgaard
Inger Njølstad
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
K. G. Jebsen - Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center (TREC) Department of Clinical Medicine UiT The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.
Source
Res Pract Thromb Haemost. 2020 08; 4(6):1004-1012
Date
08-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke and all-cause mortality. Patients with AF are also at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but information on how AF impacts VTE-related mortality is scarce.
To investigate the impact of AF on all-cause mortality in subjects with and without a thromboembolic event (VTE or ischemic stroke).
We followed 29 833 participants from the Tromsø study (1994-2008) through 2013 and recorded all deaths during follow-up. Incident AF, VTE, and ischemic stroke were registered as time-dependent exposures. We calculated mortality rates (MRs) by exposure during follow-up and obtained hazard ratios (HRs) for death with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
A total of 2087 AF cases, 756 VTEs, and 1279 ischemic strokes were registered during a median follow-up of 18.7 years, and 4797 people (16.1%) died. The age-adjusted MR for participants without any event was 1.19 per 100 person-years (PY; 95% CI, 1.15-1.23). Compared to these participants, subjects with the joint AF + VTE exposure had a 3.7-fold increased risk of death (HR, 3.67; 95% CI, 2.77-4.66) in age- and sex-adjusted analyses, similar to the risk observed for VTE alone (HR, 3.76; 95% CI, 3.28-4.30). Participants with stroke had a 2.9-fold increased risk of death (HR, 2.85; 95% CI, 2.56-3.18), and the risk was further increased in participants with both AF and stroke (HR, 4.38; 95% CI, 3.85-4.98).
AF was significantly associated with increased risk of death in participants with incident stroke. In contrast, concomitant AF was not associated with excess mortality risk in VTE patients.
PubMed ID
32864551 View in PubMed
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Body height and risk of venous thromboembolism: The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97215
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1109-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2010
Author
Sigrid K Braekkan
Knut H Borch
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. sigrid.brakkan@uit.no
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1109-15
Date
May-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Height
Confidence Intervals
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
An association between body height and venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been suggested by previous studies including males only. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the sex-specific impact of body height on risk of VTE in a general population. Risk factors, including body height and weight, were registered for 26,727 subjects aged 25-96 years who participated in the Tromsø Study (Norway) in 1994-1995. Incident VTE events were registered through September 1, 2007. There were 462 VTE events during a median 12.5 years of follow-up. Body height was a risk factor for VTE in men, but not in women. Multivariable hazard ratios per 10 cm, adjusted for age, body mass index, diabetes, smoking, and hormone therapy (women), were 1.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.09, 1.64) for men and 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 0.91, 1.40) for women. Hazard ratios by quartiles of body height revealed that men in the upper quartile (>181 cm) had a 1.99-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.35, 2.92) increased risk of VTE compared with men in the lowest quartile (
PubMed ID
20418276 View in PubMed
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