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Frames of reference for self-evaluation of ability in mathematics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30323
Source
Psychol Rep. 2004 Apr;94(2):619-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Sidsel Skaalvik
Einar M Skaalvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. sidsel.skaalvik@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Psychol Rep. 2004 Apr;94(2):619-32
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adult
Aptitude
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mathematics
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Self Concept
Self Efficacy
Social Perception
Students - psychology
Abstract
Measures of eight frame-specific self-evaluations of ability in mathematics were used to predict general mathematics self-concept and self-efficacy. Participants were 900 Norwegian students in Grade 6 (n = 277), Grade 9 (n = 236), Grade 11 (n = 263), and adult students attending senior high school (n = 124). Four items measured frame-specific self-evaluation of achievement based on external frames of reference whereas four items measured frame-specific self-evaluation based on internal frames of reference. Regression analyses were used to test relations between the frame-specific self-evaluations and general mathematics self-concept and self-efficacy. The analyses indicated that self-evaluation based on comparison with other students in class (an external frame of reference) and on comparison of mathematics achievement with achievement in other school subjects (an internal frame of reference) were robust predictors of both mathematics self-concept and self-efficacy. The analyses also indicated that students are using multiple frames of reference when evaluating their mathematics ability. Implications of the result for the internal-external frame of reference model are discussed.
PubMed ID
15154194 View in PubMed
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Self-concept and self-efficacy: a test of the internal/external frame of reference model and predictions of subsequent motivation and achievement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175769
Source
Psychol Rep. 2004 Dec;95(3 Pt 2):1187-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Einar M Skaalvik
Sidsel Skaalvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. einar.skaalvik@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Psychol Rep. 2004 Dec;95(3 Pt 2):1187-202
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Language Arts
Male
Mathematics
Motivation
Norway
Self Concept
Self Efficacy
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
We examined how final grades in mathematics and verbal arts in the first year of high school (Grade 11) were predicted in a Norwegian population by sex, previous grades in middle school (Grade 10), self-concept, self-efficacy at a domain-specific level, and intrinsic motivation. Direct and indirect relations were examined by means of a series of regression analyses. Participants were 483 students from six Norwegian high schools. End of term grades in high school correlated positively with grades in middle school in both mathematics (r = .62) and verbal arts (r = .55). The relation between grades at the two points of time was to a large extent mediated through mathematics, verbal self-concept, and self-efficacy. Intrinsic motivation also correlated positively with subsequent achievement (r = .63 and .42 in mathematics and verbal arts, respectively). However, intrinsic motivation had little predictive value for subsequent grades over and above the prediction made by self-concept and self-efficacy. Thus, self-concept and self-efficacy were the strongest predictors of subsequent grades. Predictions from the Internal/External frame of reference model were supported for self-concept but not for domain-specific self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
15762400 View in PubMed
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Teachers' feeling of belonging, exhaustion, and job satisfaction: the role of school goal structure and value consonance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137862
Source
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2011 Jul;24(4):369-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Einar M Skaalvik
Sidsel Skaalvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dragvoll, Trondheim, Norway. einar.skaalvik@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2011 Jul;24(4):369-85
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - diagnosis - psychology
Career Choice
Faculty
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Norway
Organizational Objectives
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Social Identification
Social Values
Abstract
In their daily teaching and classroom management, teachers inevitably communicate and represent values. The purpose of this study was to explore relations between teachers' perception of school level values represented by the goal structure of the school and value consonance (the degree to which they felt that they shared the prevailing norms and values at the school), teachers' feeling of belonging, emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and motivation to leave the teaching profession. The participants were 231 Norwegian teachers in elementary school and middle school. Data were analyzed by means of structural equation modeling (SEM). Teachers' perception of mastery goal structure was strongly and positively related to value consonance and negatively related to emotional exhaustion, whereas performance goal structure, in the SEM model, was not significantly related to these constructs. Furthermore, value consonance was positively related to teachers' feeling of belonging and job satisfaction, whereas emotional exhaustion was negatively associated with job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was the strongest predictor of motivation to leave the teaching profession. A practical implication of the study is that educational goals and values should be explicitly discussed and clarified, both by education authorities and at the school level.
PubMed ID
21240815 View in PubMed
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