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Factors affecting perceived risk of contracting severe acute respiratory syndrome among academic physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176708
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Dec;25(12):1111-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Sherry L Grace
Karen Hershenfield
Emma Robertson
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
University of Health Network Women's Health Program, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Dec;25(12):1111-3
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physician's Role
Risk factors
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - transmission
Abstract
SARS disproportionately affects healthcare providers. A physician survey was administered within three hospitals providing care to SARS patients. Knowing a colleague who contracted SARS and previous occupational exposure to infectious agents were significantly predictive of greater perceived risk, whereas perceived effectiveness of precautions and provision of direct care were not.
PubMed ID
15636301 View in PubMed
Less detail

The occupational and psychosocial impact of SARS on academic physicians in three affected hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173018
Source
Psychosomatics. 2005 Sep-Oct;46(5):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherry L Grace
Karen Hershenfield
Emma Robertson
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
University Health Network Women's Health Program, ML2-004c, 657 University Ave., Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 2N2. sgrace@yorku.ca
Source
Psychosomatics. 2005 Sep-Oct;46(5):385-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Ontario - epidemiology
Physician's Role
Risk factors
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - psychology - transmission
Social Alienation
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
A cross-sectional anonymous survey was administered to all directory-listed physicians within a network of three large teaching hospitals that provided care to SARS patients in Toronto. One hundred ninety-three physicians participated, 23% of whom provided direct care to SARS patients. A significantly higher rate of psychological distress was seen among physicians providing direct care to SARS patients (45.7%) than among those not providing direct care (17.7%), and physicians providing direct care reported feeling more stigmatized. Several physicians (10.9%) reported entering the hospital despite experiencing identified SARS symptoms. The most frequent SARS concerns were about the care of non-SARS patients following suspension of nonessential services and loss of physician income.
PubMed ID
16145182 View in PubMed
Less detail