Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264176
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Michele Wood
Scott A McEwen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This exploratory study used participatory methods to identify, characterize, and rank climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, Canada.
A mixed method study design was used and involved collecting both qualitative and quantitative data at regional, community, and individual levels. In-depth interviews with regional health representatives were conducted throughout Nunatsiavut (n?=?11). In addition, three PhotoVoice workshops were held with Rigolet community members (n?=?11), where participants took photos of areas, items, or concepts that expressed how climate change is impacting their health. The workshop groups shared their photographs, discussed the stories and messages behind them, and then grouped photos into re-occurring themes. Two community surveys were administered in Rigolet to capture data on observed climatic and environmental changes in the area, and perceived impacts on health, wellbeing, and lifestyles (n?=?187).
Climate-sensitive health pathways were described in terms of inter-relationships between environmental and social determinants of Inuit health. The climate-sensitive health priorities for the region included food security, water security, mental health and wellbeing, new hazards and safety concerns, and health services and delivery.
The results highlight several climate-sensitive health priorities that are specific to the Nunatsiavut region, and suggest approaching health research and adaptation planning from an EcoHealth perspective.
PubMed ID
26135309 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity and food consumption by season in households with children in an Arctic city: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283392
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17(1):578
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2017
Author
Catherine Huet
James D Ford
Victoria L Edge
Jamal Shirley
Nia King
Sherilee L Harper
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17(1):578
Date
Jun-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
High rates of food insecurity are documented among Inuit households in Canada; however, data on food insecurity prevalence and seasonality for Inuit households with children are lacking, especially in city centres. This project: (1) compared food consumption patterns for households with and without children, (2) compared the prevalence of food insecurity for households with and without children, (3) compared food consumption patterns and food insecurity prevalence between seasons, and (4) identified factors associated with food insecurity in households with children in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.
Randomly selected households were surveyed in Iqaluit in September 2012 and May 2013. Household food security status was determined using an adapted United States Department of Agriculture Household Food Security Survey Module. Univariable logistic regressions were used to examine unconditional associations between food security status and demographics, socioeconomics, frequency of food consumption, and method of food preparation in households with children by season.
Households with children (n = 431) and without children (n = 468) participated in the survey. Food insecurity was identified in 32.9% (95% CI: 28.5-37.4%) of households with children; this was significantly higher than in households without children (23.2%, 95% CI: 19.4-27.1%). The prevalence of household food insecurity did not significantly differ by season. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the person responsible for food preparation, including low formal education attainment (ORSept = 4.3, 95% CI: 2.3-8.0; ORMay = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.8-5.8), unemployment (ORSept = 1.1, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3; ORMay = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5), and Inuit identity (ORSept = 8.9, 95% CI: 3.4-23.5; ORMay = 21.8, 95% CI: 6.6-72.4), were associated with increased odds of food insecurity in households with children. Fruit and vegetable consumption (ORSept = 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8; ORMay = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9), as well as eating cooked (ORSept = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-1.0; ORMay = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) and raw (ORSept = 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.0; ORMay = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.0-3.1) fish were associated with decreased odds of food insecurity among households with children, while eating frozen meat and/or fish (ORSept = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-5.0; ORMay = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1-3.7) was associated with increased odds of food insecurity.
Food insecurity is high among households with children in Iqaluit. Despite the partial subsistence livelihoods of many Inuit in the city, we found no seasonal differences in food security and food consumption for households with children. Interventions aiming to decrease food insecurity in these households should consider food consumption habits, and the reported demographic and socioeconomic determinants of food insecurity.
Notes
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-1721158957
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2008 Apr;11(4):349-6017610753
Cites: J Nutr. 2014 Dec;144(12):2066-7225320183
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Jun 21;12:46422720722
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null23984307
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):752-6022874098
Cites: J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):604-1218287374
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Jul 04;14:68024993286
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Aug 05;74:2728426248959
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: J Nutr. 2007 Apr;137(4):1110-417374689
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 May 16;72:1992823687639
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2014 Jul 22;105(4):e233-825166123
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(2):168021702639
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):488-9722005728
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Jun;69(3):285-30320519090
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Dec;112(12):1949-5823174682
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):373-8321878183
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-5919840421
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-3117319086
Cites: Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2009 May;12(3):310-619333121
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2013 Nov-Dec;45(6):780-424021456
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-20120737808
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2009 Jan;13(1):66-8018317892
Cites: Health Rep. 2001 Aug;12(4):11-2215069808
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):286-30021631967
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jan;17(1):31-923806766
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-722323760
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:51-821158962
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-1214576717
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Oct;143(10):1659-6523946342
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jan;17 (1):145-5523083836
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 1996;16:417-428839933
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2003 May-Jun;35(3):148-5312773286
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011 Fall;72(3):133-621896250
PubMed ID
28619039 View in PubMed
Less detail

"From this place and of this place:" climate change, sense of place, and health in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124293
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Sherilee L Harper
James D Ford
Karen Landman
Karen Houle
Victoria L Edge
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design & Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. ashlee@uoguelph.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Emotions
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Nunavut - epidemiology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
As climate change impacts are felt around the globe, people are increasingly exposed to changes in weather patterns, wildlife and vegetation, and water and food quality, access and availability in their local regions. These changes can impact human health and well-being in a variety of ways: increased risk of foodborne and waterborne diseases; increased frequency and distribution of vector-borne disease; increased mortality and injury due to extreme weather events and heat waves; increased respiratory and cardiovascular disease due to changes in air quality and increased allergens in the air; and increased susceptibility to mental and emotional health challenges. While climate change is a global phenomenon, the impacts are experienced most acutely in place; as such, a sense of place, place-attachment, and place-based identities are important indicators for climate-related health and adaptation. Representing one of the first qualitative case studies to examine the connections among climate change, a changing sense of place, and health in an Inuit context, this research draws data from a multi-year community-driven case study situated in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Canada. Data informing this paper were drawn from the narrative analysis of 72 in-depth interviews conducted from November 2009 to October 2010, as well as from the descriptive analysis of 112 questionnaires from a survey in October 2010 (95% response rate). The findings illustrated that climate change is negatively affecting feelings of place attachment by disrupting hunting, fishing, foraging, trapping, and traveling, and changing local landscapes-changes which subsequently impact physical, mental, and emotional health and well-being. These results also highlight the need to develop context-specific climate-health planning and adaptation programs, and call for an understanding of place-attachment as a vital indicator of health and well-being and for climate change to be framed as an important determinant of health.
PubMed ID
22595069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healthcare use for acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263115
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:26290
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
M Kate Thomas
David Pearl
Jamal Shirley
Scott A McEwen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:26290
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, is higher than reported elsewhere in Canada; as such, understanding AGI-related healthcare use is important for healthcare provision, public health practice and surveillance of AGI.
This study described symptoms, severity and duration of self-reported AGI in the general population and examined the incidence and factors associated with healthcare utilization for AGI in these 2 Inuit communities.
Cross-sectional survey data were analysed using multivariable exact logistic regression to examine factors associated with individuals' self-reported healthcare and over-the-counter (OTC) medication utilization related to AGI symptoms.
In Rigolet, few AGI cases used healthcare services [4.8% (95% CI=1.5-14.4%)]; in Iqaluit, some cases used healthcare services [16.9% (95% CI=11.2-24.7%)]. Missing traditional activities due to AGI (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.18-12.4) and taking OTC medication for AGI symptoms (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.2-15.1) were associated with increased odds of using healthcare services in Iqaluit. In both communities, AGI severity and secondary symptoms (extreme tiredness, headache, muscle pains, chills) were significantly associated with increased odds of taking OTC medication.
While rates of self-reported AGI were higher in Inuit communities compared to non-Inuit communities in Canada, there were lower rates of AGI-related healthcare use in Inuit communities compared to other regions in Canada. As such, the rates of healthcare use for a given disease can differ between Inuit and non-Inuit communities, and caution should be exercised in making comparisons between Inuit and non-Inuit health outcomes based solely on clinic records and healthcare use.
PubMed ID
26001982 View in PubMed
Less detail

How are perceptions associated with water consumption in Canadian Inuit? A cross-sectional survey in Rigolet, Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287104
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 10;618:369-378
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2017
Author
Carlee J Wright
Jan M Sargeant
Victoria L Edge
James D Ford
Khosrow Farahbakhsh
Inez Shiwak
Charlie Flowers
Allan C Gordon
Sherilee L Harper
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 10;618:369-378
Date
Nov-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Concerns regarding the safety and aesthetic qualities of one's municipal drinking water supply are important factors influencing drinking water perceptions and consumption patterns (i.e. sources used and daily volume of consumption). In northern Canada, Inuit communities face challenges with drinking water quality, and many Inuit have reported concerns regarding the safety of their drinking water. The objectives of this research were to describe perceptions of municipal tap water, examine use of water sources and changes following the installation of a potable water dispensing unit (PWDU) in 2014, and identify factors associated with water consumption in the Inuit community of Rigolet. This study used data from three cross-sectional census surveys conducted between 2012 and 2014. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to aggregate data from multiple variables related to perceptions of water, and logistic regressions were used to identify variables associated with water consumption patterns. Three quarters of residents reported using the PWDU after its installation, with concomitant declines reported in consumption of bottled, tap, and brook water. Negative perceptions of tap water were associated with lower odds of consuming tap water (ORPCAcomponent1=0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.94; ORPCAcomponent2=0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93); women had higher odds of drinking purchased water compared to men (OR=1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.26). The median amount of water consumed per day was 1L. Using brook water (OR=2.60, 95% CI 1.22-5.56) and living in a household where no one had full-time employment (OR=2.94, 95% CI 1.35-6.39) were associated with consuming >2L of water per day. Results of this study may inform drinking water interventions, risk assessments, and public health messaging in Rigolet and other Indigenous communities.
PubMed ID
29132004 View in PubMed
Less detail

How are perceptions associated with water consumption in Canadian Inuit? A cross-sectional survey in Rigolet, Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294562
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Mar 15; 618:369-378
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-15-2018
Author
Carlee J Wright
Jan M Sargeant
Victoria L Edge
James D Ford
Khosrow Farahbakhsh
Inez Shiwak
Charlie Flowers
Allan C Gordon
Sherilee L Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada. Electronic address: carlee@uoguelph.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Mar 15; 618:369-378
Date
Mar-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drinking - ethnology
Drinking Water
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Surveys and Questionnaires
Water Quality
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
Concerns regarding the safety and aesthetic qualities of one's municipal drinking water supply are important factors influencing drinking water perceptions and consumption patterns (i.e. sources used and daily volume of consumption). In northern Canada, Inuit communities face challenges with drinking water quality, and many Inuit have reported concerns regarding the safety of their drinking water. The objectives of this research were to describe perceptions of municipal tap water, examine use of water sources and changes following the installation of a potable water dispensing unit (PWDU) in 2014, and identify factors associated with water consumption in the Inuit community of Rigolet. This study used data from three cross-sectional census surveys conducted between 2012 and 2014. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to aggregate data from multiple variables related to perceptions of water, and logistic regressions were used to identify variables associated with water consumption patterns. Three quarters of residents reported using the PWDU after its installation, with concomitant declines reported in consumption of bottled, tap, and brook water. Negative perceptions of tap water were associated with lower odds of consuming tap water (ORPCAcomponent1=0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.94; ORPCAcomponent2=0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93); women had higher odds of drinking purchased water compared to men (OR=1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.26). The median amount of water consumed per day was 1L. Using brook water (OR=2.60, 95% CI 1.22-5.56) and living in a household where no one had full-time employment (OR=2.94, 95% CI 1.35-6.39) were associated with consuming >2L of water per day. Results of this study may inform drinking water interventions, risk assessments, and public health messaging in Rigolet and other Indigenous communities.
PubMed ID
29132004 View in PubMed
Less detail

How does the media portray drinking water security in Indigenous communities in Canada? An analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage from 2000-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281076
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Mar 27;17(1):282
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-27-2017
Author
Steven Lam
Ashlee Cunsolo
Alexandra Sawatzky
James Ford
Sherilee L Harper
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Mar 27;17(1):282
Date
Mar-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Drinking water insecurity and related health outcomes often disproportionately impact Indigenous communities internationally. Understanding media coverage of these water-related issues can provide insight into the ways in which public perceptions are shaped, with potential implications for decision-making and action. This study aimed to examine the extent, range, and nature of newspaper coverage of drinking water security in Canadian Indigenous communities.
Using ProQuest database, we systematically searched for and screened newspaper articles published from 2000 to 2015 from Canadian newspapers: Windspeaker, Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail, and National Post. We conducted descriptive quantitative analysis and thematic qualitative analysis on relevant articles to characterize framing and trends in coverage.
A total of 1382 articles were returned in the search, of which 256 articles were identified as relevant. There was limited coverage of water challenges for Canadian Indigenous communities, especially for Métis (5%) and Inuit (3%) communities. Most stories focused on government responses to water-related issues, and less often covered preventative measures such as source water protection. Overall, Indigenous peoples were quoted the most often. Double-standards of water quality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, along with conflict and cooperation efforts between stakeholders were emphasized in many articles.
Limited media coverage could undermine public and stakeholder interest in addressing water-related issues faced by many Canadian Indigenous communities.
PubMed ID
28347284 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lived experience of acute gastrointestinal illness in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut: "Just suffer through it"

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258513
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Dec 8;126C:86-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2014
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
M Kate Thomas
Scott A McEwen
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Dec 8;126C:86-98
Date
Dec-8-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Enteric illness associated with foodborne and waterborne disease is thought to be common in some Canadian Indigenous communities. This study aimed to understand the lived experience of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI), including symptoms and severity, perceived causes, and healthcare seeking behaviors of AGI in the small Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada. A concurrent mixed quantitative and qualitative methods design was used. Two cross-sectional retrospective surveys provided quantitative data to examine self-reported AGI symptoms and the distribution of potential risk factors in the community. Qualitative data from in-depth interviews with one-third of AGI cases were analyzed using a constant-comparative method to describe symptoms and severity, identify perceived risk factors, and explore health seeking behavior of AGI in Rigolet. Of the survey respondents reporting AGI, most reported symptoms of diarrhea without vomiting, followed by diarrhea with vomiting, and vomiting without diarrhea. The most common secondary symptoms included stomach cramps and abdominal pain, nausea, and extreme tiredness. Community members identified potential risk factors for AGI that reflect the epidemiology triad (host, agent, and environmental factors), including hygiene, retail food, tap water, boil water advisories, and personal stress. Risk aversion and healthcare seeking behaviors reflected the core constructs of the Health Belief Model (perceived susceptibility, severity, and benefits and barriers to action). Understanding community experience, perspectives, and beliefs related to AGI is useful for public health practitioners and health care providers. This information is important especially considering the relatively high estimated burden of AGI and the relatively low healthcare seeking behaviors in some Indigenous communities compared to national estimates. Moreover, the mixed-methods approach used to understand the burden of AGI could be extended to other health research in Indigenous contexts.
PubMed ID
25528558 View in PubMed
Less detail

The need for community-led, integrated and innovative monitoring programmes when responding to the health impacts of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299786
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Jan-Dec; 78(2):1517581
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Amy Kipp
Ashlee Cunsolo
Daniel Gillis
Alexandra Sawatzky
Sherilee L Harper
Author Affiliation
a Department of Population Medicine , University of Guelph , Guelph , ON , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Jan-Dec; 78(2):1517581
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Canada, climate change has led to many acute and interrelated health and environmental impacts experienced among Inuit populations. Community-based monitoring, in which community members participate in monitoring initiatives using various forms of technology, is a key strategy increasingly used to detect, monitor and respond to climate change impacts. To better understand the landscape of existing environmental and health monitoring programmes mobilising different technologies and operating in the North we conducted a review that used environmental scan methodologies to explore and contextualise these programmes. We consulted with academic researchers with experience in community-led monitoring, conducted systematic searches of grey and peer-reviewed literature, and conducted a secondary search for environment-health mobile-phone applications. Following specific criteria, we identified 18 monitoring programmes using information and communication technologies in the North, and three global monitoring mobile-phone applications, which cumulatively monitored 74 environment and health indicators. Several themes emerged, including the need for: (1) community leadership, (2) indicators of environment and/or human health and (3) innovative technology. This synthesis supports the development of community-led, environment-health monitoring programmes that use innovative technology to monitor and share information related to the health implications of climate change in and around Indigenous communities throughout the Circumpolar North.
PubMed ID
31066653 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and genetic characterization of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in dogs in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301905
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2019 Nov; 66(7):813-825
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2019
Author
Danielle A Julien
Jan M Sargeant
Rebecca A Guy
Karen Shapiro
Rachel K Imai
Anna Bunce
Enooyaq Sudlovenick
Shu Chen
Jiping Li
Sherilee L Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2019 Nov; 66(7):813-825
Date
Nov-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
There are few epidemiologic studies on the role of dogs in zoonotic parasitic transmission in the Circumpolar North. The objectives of this study were to: (a) estimate the faecal prevalence of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in dogs; (b) investigate potential associations between the type of dog population and the faecal presence of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp.; and (c) describe the molecular characteristics of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in dogs in Iqaluit, Nunavut. We conducted two cross-sectional studies in July and September 2016. In July, the team collected daily faecal samples for 3 days from each of 20 sled dogs. In September, the team collected three faecal samples from each of 59 sled dogs, 111 samples from shelter dogs and 104 from community dogs. We analysed faecal samples for the presence of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. using rapid immunoassay and flotation techniques. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of target genes were performed on positive faecal samples. Overall, the faecal prevalence of at least one of the target parasites, when one faecal sample was chosen at random for all dogs, was 8.16% (CI: 5.52-11.92), and for Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp., prevalence was 4.42% (CI: 2.58-7.49) and 6.12% (CI: 3.88-9.53), respectively. The odds of faecal Giardia spp. in sled dogs were significantly higher than those in shelter and community dogs (OR 10.19 [CI: 1.16-89.35]). Sequence analysis revealed that 6 faecal samples were Giardia intestinalis, zoonotic assemblage B (n = 2) and species-specific assemblages D (n = 3) and E (n = 1), and five faecal samples were Cryptosporidium canis. Giardia intestinalis is zoonotic; however, Cryptosporidium canis is rare in humans and, when present, usually occurs in immunosuppressed individuals. Dogs may be a potential source of zoonotic Giardia intestinalis assemblage B infections in residents in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada; however, the direction of transmission is unclear.
PubMed ID
31305029 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.