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Accessible support for family caregivers of seniors with chronic conditions: from isolation to inclusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168465
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):179-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Miriam Stewart
Alison Barnfather
Anne Neufeld
Sharon Warren
Nicole Letourneau
Lili Liu
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nusing, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):179-92
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - psychology
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Health education
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Social Isolation
Social Support
Stroke - psychology
Abstract
Accessible support programs can improve health outcomes for family caregivers of older relatives with a chronic condition. Over the course of 6 months, 27 experienced family caregivers provided weekly support via the telephone to 66 individuals, either new family caregivers of seniors recently diagnosed with stroke or newly vulnerable family caregivers (i.e., facing increasing demands from the deterioration of their senior relative's condition) of seniors with Alzheimer's disease. Qualitative data documented the perceived impact of the intervention, including increased satisfaction with support, coping skills, caregiving competence and confidence, and decreased caregiver burden and loneliness. Caregivers identified varied support processes that overcame support deficits in their social networks. These processes can facilitate replication in future research and inform practice, programs, and policies.
PubMed ID
16821200 View in PubMed
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The burden of multiple sclerosis: a community health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159460
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
C Allyson Jones
Sheri L Pohar
Sharon Warren
Karen V L Turpin
Kenneth G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G4, Canada. cajones@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:1
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Chronic Disease - economics
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - psychology
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Health-related quality of life (HRQL) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) who reside within the community relative to the general population is largely unknown. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.1 (CCHS 1.1) were used to compare HRQL of persons with MS and the general population.
A representative sample of adults (18 years or older) from the cross sectional population health survey, CCHS 1.1, was examined to compare scores on the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3), a generic preference-based HRQL measure, of respondents with (n = 302) and without (n = 109,741) MS. Selected sociodemographic covariates were adjusted for in ANCOVA models. Normalized sampling weights and bootstrap variance estimates were used in the analysis.
The mean difference in overall HUI3 scores between respondents with and without MS was 0.25 (95% CI: 0.20, 0.31); eight times greater than the clinically important difference. The largest differences in scores were seen with the ambulation (0.26; 95% CI: 0.20, 0.32) and pain attributes (0.14; 95% CI: 0.09, 0.19). Clinically important differences with dexterity and cognition were also observed.
While the proportion of the Canadian population with MS is relatively small in comparison to other diseases, the magnitude of the burden is severe relative to the general population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18179687 View in PubMed
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Caller self-care decisions following teletriage advice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127549
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Apr;21(7-8):1041-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Bev Williams
Sharon Warren
Robert McKim
Wonita Janzen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Beverly.williams@ualberta.ca
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Apr;21(7-8):1041-50
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Cost Savings
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Female
Health Care Surveys
Hotlines - organization & administration
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient satisfaction
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - organization & administration
Self Care
Triage
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine caller self-care decisions following teletriage advice provided by nurses.
The use of teletriage is gaining popularity as one way of enhancing capacity for self-care. Research from several countries suggests that teletriage reduces the use of other healthcare services without compromising safety. However, there is little or no research related to how often self-care advice is provided and whether or not callers follow the advice.
A descriptive survey design was used with a random sample of 312 callers who were advised by a teletriage nurse to engage in self-care.
Callers were randomly selected from all calls to a teletriage service each day of the month for nine months. Data were collected using a researcher-developed interview guide and analysed using a variety of inferential statistics for forced choice questions and content analysis for open-ended questions.
The majority of callers who were advised to engage in self-care reported doing so. Callers with greater self-efficacy and satisfaction with the nurse interaction were more likely to follow advice to self-care. All callers would call the teletriage service again for the same or a different issue.
Teletriage callers were confident in the advice provided and were willing to continue to use the service.
This study indicates that teletriage programmes are a cost-effective way of addressing self-care needs of individuals who might otherwise visit an emergency department.
PubMed ID
22283747 View in PubMed
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Cognitive assessments for older adults: which ones are used by Canadian therapists and why.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159422
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2007 Dec;74(5):370-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Alison Douglas
Lili Liu
Sharon Warren
Tammy Hopper
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, School of Rehabilitation Science, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2007 Dec;74(5):370-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cognition
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Abstract
Occupational therapists routinely evaluate cognition in older adults, yet little is known about which assessments they use and for what purposes.
To examine the standardised and non-standardised assessments used by occupational therapists to evaluate cognition.
A random sample of 1042 Canadian occupational therapists completed the questionnaire by e-mail, post, or Internet website (n=247, response rate: 24.5%).
Respondents reported using 75 standardised and non-standardised measures. The assessments were grouped according to theoretical approach: bottom-up (assessment of cognitive components), top-down (assessment of function) and combined (either of above, plus interview). Theoretical approaches were used similarly across regions, despite differences in reporting of particular assessments. Therapists used more bottom-up assessments that were standardised, identified deficits, and easy to administer. They used more top-down assessments that were non-standardised, predicted function, and fit with their theoretical approach.
It is recommended that standardised top-down assessments be developed to support evidence-based occupational therapy.
PubMed ID
18183772 View in PubMed
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Effects of profession and facility type on research utilization by rehabilitation professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180878
Source
J Allied Health. 2004;33(1):3-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Kerrie Pain
Joyce Magill-Evans
Johanna Darrah
Paul Hagler
Sharon Warren
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Services, Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kpain@ualberta.ca
Source
J Allied Health. 2004;33(1):3-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Education, Continuing - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine - education - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Services - utilization
Institutional Practice - classification - standards
Occupational Therapy - education - standards
Physical Therapy Specialty - education - standards
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Rehabilitation, Vocational - standards
Speech-Language Pathology - education - standards
Abstract
Information about the use of research by rehabilitation professionals to make clinical decisions in everyday practice is limited. This study compared perceived research use and knowledge sources across professions, practice situations, and work environments. Participants were 165 randomly selected Canadian occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists. Self-report ratings during an interview, an interviewer rating, and questionnaire scores (Edmonton Research Orientation Survey, General Use of Research, Knowledge Acquisition Survey) were compared. Speech-language pathologists had the most education and the highest research use ratings. Research use was highest during program planning. Programs to encourage research use must consider the research available to guide practice and therapists' education level. Facility size and location (rural, urban) do not affect perceived research use.
PubMed ID
15053214 View in PubMed
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Emergency department patient satisfaction survey in Alberta's Capital Health region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164937
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(1):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Robert McKim
Sharon Warren
Carmel Montgomery
Joanne Zaborowski
Colleen McKee
Donna Towers
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation, School of Public Health, University of Alberta.
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(1):34-42
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Data Collection
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Abstract
In 2005, a large Canadian health region conducted an emergency department patient feedback survey to obtain information on patient perceptions of satisfaction with emergency services received. The Capital Health region is one of nine Alberta Health Authorities, located in the central portion of the province, serving a population of 1.6 million people in metropolitan Edmonton and the surrounding area. Analysis reveals significant demographic and acuity differences in perceptions of care and suggests the need to consider patient mix in future satisfaction surveys and to examine improvement strategies targeted at these specific patient groups.
PubMed ID
17326368 View in PubMed
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Geographic and temporal distribution of mortality rates for multiple sclerosis in Canada, 1965-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186807
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Jan-Feb;22(1):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sharon Warren
K G Warren
Lawrence W Svenson
Donald P Schopflocher
Allyson Jones
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. sharon.warren@ualberta.ca
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Jan-Feb;22(1):75-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Geography - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - mortality
Prevalence
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Statistics Canada data were used to calculate multiple sclerosis (MS) mortality rates per 100,000 population in the Canadian provinces from 1965 to 1994. For the period 1965-1994, the highest average annual MS mortality rates were in Quebec (4.4) and Ontario (3.9), while the Western Provinces had an intermediate rate (2.1) and the Atlantic Provinces had the lowest rate (1.2). Female mortality rates exceeded male rates in each of the four regions. Average annual MS mortality rates in Canada overall fluctuated during the past 30 years, with rates of 3.4 in 1965-1969, 4.2 in 1970-1974, 3.2 in 1975-1979, 2.3 in 1980-1984, 2.8 in 1985-1989 and 3.9 in 1990-1994. Female mortality rates exceeded male rates during each 5-year period. The highest mortality rates for both genders were in the 65 years plus age group. Rates in the under 45 years age group have remained stable, while rates in both the 45-64 and 65 years plus age groups have fluctuated. There is no apparent relationship between prevalence and mortality rates among the Canadian provinces.
PubMed ID
12566957 View in PubMed
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Highlights of the 2002 Canadian Neurological Society (CNS) manpower survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171209
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2005 Nov;32(4):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Peter Bailey
Sharon Warren
Lynda Buske
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Saint John Campus, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2005 Nov;32(4):425-32
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Neurology - manpower
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians
Questionnaires
Societies
Abstract
The Canadian Neurological Society commissioned a manpower survey in 2002 to assess demographics, distribution, specialty interests, working conditions, job satisfaction and future plans of neurologists across the country.
A survey was mailed to all known Canadian neurologists (n = 694) on two separate occasions. Further encouragement by telephone contact was undertaken. The response rate was 54%.
The mean age of neurologists who responded was 51 years, with 14% being women. Approximately 55% of neurologists were community-based. Seventy-six percent designated a sub-specialty interest. On average, neurologists worked 57 hours per week and the majority had significant "on-call" commitments. Job satisfaction was higher among academic neurologists when compared with community-based neurologists, and greater among men than women. A greater percentage of older neurologists were satisfied with their work than their younger colleagues. Significant attrition in the neurological work force is a major concern, since up to 20% of neurologists reported that they are likely to retire in the next five years and about 15% are likely to reduce their practice.
This survey suggests that substantial concerns are facing Canadian neurology over the next five years. Major efforts to retain existing expertise and enhance residency training will be required to simply maintain the present quality of neurological care in Canada.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Neurol Sci. 2005 Nov;32(4):399-40016408566
PubMed ID
16408571 View in PubMed
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The impact of adult day programs on family caregivers of elderly relatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182589
Source
J Community Health Nurs. 2003;20(4):209-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Sharon Warren
Janet Ross Kerr
Donna Smith
Corinne Schalm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. sharon.warren@ualberta.ca
Source
J Community Health Nurs. 2003;20(4):209-21
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Day Care - standards
Family - psychology
Female
Health Services Research
Health status
Humans
Institutionalization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Respite Care - standards
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
Adult day programs for elderly people have been implemented throughout North America but not widely evaluated for their impact on family caregivers. This study examined caregiver outcomes at 14 programs in Alberta, Canada. Caregivers were measured on burden, quality of life, perceived health, opinion on institutionalization at 4 time points (just prior to client admission, 2 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months after admission), and satisfaction with the program at 3 points after client admission. Caregiver status on burden, quality of life, and perceived health status remained stable over time. In addition, caregivers' opinion on institutionalization remained negative and satisfaction with the programs high. Caregivers reported that client socializing and improved health were what they liked best about the programs, followed by respite for themselves. Time conflicts-limits and transportation were identified as problems. The results suggest that adult day programs may help caregivers to continue in their caregiving role and to keep clients in the community longer.
PubMed ID
14644688 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.