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Association Between Distance From Home to Tobacco Outlet and Smoking Cessation and Relapse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282305
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 01;176(10):1512-1519
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2016
Author
Anna Pulakka
Jaana I Halonen
Ichiro Kawachi
Jaana Pentti
Sari Stenholm
Markus Jokela
Ilkka Kaate
Markku Koskenvuo
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 01;176(10):1512-1519
Date
Oct-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Commerce
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Products
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
Reduced availability of tobacco outlets is hypothesized to reduce smoking, but longitudinal evidence on this issue is scarce.
To examine whether changes in distance from home to tobacco outlet are associated with changes in smoking behaviors.
The data from 2 prospective cohort studies included geocoded residential addresses, addresses of tobacco outlets, and responses to smoking surveys in 2008 and 2012 (the Finnish Public Sector [FPS] study, n?=?53?755) or 2003 and 2012 (the Health and Social Support [HeSSup] study, n?=?11?924). All participants were smokers or ex-smokers at baseline. We used logistic regression in between-individual analyses and conditional logistic regression in case-crossover design analyses to examine change in walking distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet as a predictor of quitting smoking in smokers and smoking relapse in ex-smokers. Study-specific estimates were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis.
Walking distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet.
Quitting smoking and smoking relapse as indicated by self-reported current and previous smoking at baseline and follow-up.
Overall, 20?729 men and women (age range 18-75 years) were recruited. Of the 6259 and 2090 baseline current smokers, 1744 (28%) and 818 (39%) quit, and of the 8959 and 3421 baseline ex-smokers, 617 (7%) and 205 (6%) relapsed in the FPS and HeSSup studies, respectively. Among the baseline smokers, a 500-m increase in distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet was associated with a 16% increase in odds of quitting smoking in the between-individual analysis (pooled odds ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.28) and 57% increase in within-individual analysis (pooled odds ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.32-1.86), after adjusting for changes in self-reported marital and working status, substantial worsening of financial situation, illness in the family, and own health status. Increase in distance to the nearest tobacco outlet was not associated with smoking relapse among the ex-smokers.
These data suggest that increase in distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet may increase quitting among smokers. No effect of change in distance on relapse in ex-smokers was observed.
PubMed ID
27533777 View in PubMed
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The association between mental health symptoms and mobility limitation among Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266869
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Shadia Rask
Anu E Castaneda
Päivikki Koponen
Päivi Sainio
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Suvisaari
Teppo Juntunen
Tapio Halla
Tommi Härkänen
Seppo Koskinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:275
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Checklist
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Somatoform Disorders - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Research has demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between physical function and depression, but studies on their association in migrant populations are scarce. We examined the association between mental health symptoms and mobility limitation in Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants in Finland.
We used data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (Maamu). The participants comprised 1357 persons of Russian, Somali or Kurdish origin aged 18-64 years. Mobility limitation included self-reported difficulties in walking 500?m or stair climbing. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) and symptoms of somatization using the somatization subscale of the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R). A comparison group of the general Finnish population was selected from the Health 2011 study.
Anxiety symptoms were positively associated with mobility limitation in women (Russians odds ratio [OR] 2.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-6.94, Somalis OR 6.41; 95% CI 2.02-20.29 and Kurds OR 2.67; 95% CI 1.41-5.04), after adjustment for socio-demographic factors, obesity and chronic diseases. Also somatization increased the odds for mobility limitation in women (Russians OR 4.29; 95% CI 1.76-10.44, Somalis OR 18.83; 95% CI 6.15-57.61 and Kurds OR 3.53; 95% CI 1.91-6.52). Depressive symptoms were associated with mobility limitation in Russian and Kurdish women (Russians OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.27-7.19 and Kurds OR 2.64; 95% CI 1.39-4.99). Anxiety symptoms and somatization were associated with mobility limitation in Kurdish men when adjusted for socio-demographic factors, but not after adjusting for obesity and chronic diseases. Finnish women had similar associations as the migrant women, but Finnish men and Kurdish men showed varying associations.
Mental health symptoms are significantly associated with mobility limitation both in the studied migrant populations and in the general Finnish population. The joint nature of mental health symptoms and mobility limitation should be recognized by health professionals, also when working with migrants. This association should be addressed when developing health services and health promotion.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25884326 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity history and hand grip strength in older adults--exploring the roles of inflammation and insulin resistance as mediating factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137143
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Mar;66(3):341-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Sari Stenholm
Janne Sallinen
Annemarie Koster
Taina Rantanen
Päivi Sainio
Markku Heliövaara
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Functional Capacity and Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Peltolantie 3, FI-20720 Turku, Finland. sari.stenholm@thl.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Mar;66(3):341-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Height
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein
Female
Finland
Hand Strength
Humans
Inflammation - complications
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Obesity - complications
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine the association between obesity history and hand grip strength, and whether the association is partly explained by subclinical inflammation and insulin resistance.
Data are from 2,021 men and women aged 55 years and older participating in the representative population-based Health 2000 Survey in Finland. Body mass and body height, maximal hand grip strength, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance based on homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) were measured in a health examination. Recalled weight at 20, 30, 40, and 50 years of age were recorded to obtain a hierarchical classification of obesity history. Obesity was defined as body mass index = 30 kg/m².
Earlier onset of obesity was associated with lower hand grip strength (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21310808 View in PubMed
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Association of Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference With Physical Functioning: The Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265788
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jul;70(7):885-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Inna Lisko
Sari Stenholm
Jani Raitanen
Mikko Hurme
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Kristina Tiainen
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jul;70(7):885-91
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - physiopathology
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Thinness - complications - physiopathology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Both obesity and underweight are associated with impaired physical functioning, but related information on the oldest old population is scarce. Our purpose was to examine whether body mass index, waist circumference (WC), and their combination are associated with physical performance and activities of daily living (ADL) disability in 90-year-old women and men.
Data are from the Vitality 90+ Study, which is a population-based study of persons with age =90 years living in the area of Tampere, Finland. Altogether 416 women and 153 men, aged 90-91 years, provided data on body mass index, WC, chair stand, and Barthel Index. Comorbidity, physical exercise, smoking history, living residence, and sample year were used as covariates in multinomial logistic and logistic regression models.
Women in the highest WC tertile had lower physical performance and were more likely unable to perform the chair stand than women in the lowest WC tertile. Women in the highest WC tertile were also more likely to have ADL disability, compared to the lowest WC tertile. In women, overweight and obesity were associated with ADL disability, but not when WC was included in the model. Men with body mass index =25 kg/m(2) and WC
PubMed ID
25394617 View in PubMed
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Association of Self-Rated Health in Midlife With Mortality and Old Age Frailty: A 26-Year Follow-Up of Initially Healthy Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284814
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jul;71(7):923-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Emmi Huohvanainen
Arto Y Strandberg
Sari Stenholm
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Reijo S Tilvis
Timo E Strandberg
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jul;71(7):923-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Primary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between self-rated health (SRH) in healthy midlife, mortality, and frailty in old age.
In 1974, male volunteers for a primary prevention trial in the Helsinki Businessmen Study (mean age 47 years, n = 1,753) reported SRH using a five-step scale (1 = "very good," n = 124; 2 = "fairly good," n = 862; 3 = "average," n = 706; 4 = "fairly poor," or 5 = "very poor"; in the analyses, 4 and 5 were combined as "poor", n = 61). In 2000 (mean age 73 years), the survivors were assessed using a questionnaire including the RAND-36/SF-36 health-related quality of life instrument. Simplified self-reported criteria were used to define phenotypic prefrailty and frailty. Mortality was retrieved from national registers.
During the 26-year follow-up, 410 men had died. Frailty status was assessed in 81.0% (n = 1,088) of survivors: 434 (39.9%), 552 (50.7%), and 102 (9.4%) were classified as not frail, prefrail, and frail, respectively. With fairly good SRH as reference, and adjusted for cardiovascular risk in midlife and comorbidity in old age, midlife SRH was related to mortality in a J-shaped fashion: significant increase with both very good and poor SRH. In similar analyses, average SRH in midlife (n = 425) was related to prefrailty (odds ratio: 1.52, 95% confidence interval: 1.14-2.04) and poor SRH (n = 31) both to prefrailty (odds ratio: 3.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-10.9) and frailty (odds ratio: 8.38, 95% confidence interval: 2.32-30.3) in old age.
SRH in clinically healthy midlife among volunteers of a primary prevention trial was related to the development of both prefrailty and frailty in old age, independent of baseline cardiovascular risk and later comorbidity.
PubMed ID
26774116 View in PubMed
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Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference as Predictors of Disability in Nonagenarians: The Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286877
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1569-1574
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-2017
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Jani Raitanen
Juulia Jylhävä
Mikko Hurme
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Sari Stenholm
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1569-1574
Date
Oct-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Only scarce data exist on the association between obesity and disability in the oldest old. The purpose of this prospective study is to examine if body mass index and waist circumference (WC) are associated with incident mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) disability in nonagenarians.
We used longitudinal data from the Vitality 90+ Study, which is a population-based study conducted at the area of Tampere, Finland. Altogether 291 women and 134 men, aged 90-91 years, had measured data on body mass index and/or WC and did not have self-reported mobility or ADL disability at baseline. Incident mobility and ADL disability was followed-up on median 3.6 years (range 0.6-7.8 years). Mortality was also followed-up. Multinomial logistic regression models were used for the analyses, as death was treated as an alternative outcome. The follow-up time was taken into account in the analyses.
Neither low or high body mass index, nor low or high WC, were associated with incident mobility disability. In women, the lowest WC tertile (
PubMed ID
28329171 View in PubMed
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Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio as predictors of mortality in nonagenarians: the Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131940
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Nov;66(11):1244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Sari Stenholm
Tiina Luukkaala
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. inna.lisko@uta.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Nov;66(11):1244-50
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Size - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - mortality
Obesity, Abdominal - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The associations of body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity with mortality among very old people are poorly known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of BMI, waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio with mortality in nonagenarians.
This study is part of a prospective population-based study, Vitality 90+, including both community-dwelling and institutionalized persons from Tampere, Finland. Altogether 192 women and 65 men aged 90 years were subjected to anthropometric measurements, a baseline interview, and a 4-year mortality follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used in the statistical analyses.
In men, normal weight indicated a three times higher mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] 3.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-7.06) compared with overweight, and WC was inversely associated with mortality (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-1.00) after adjustment for covariates. In women, the univariate waist-to-hip ratio (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.06-1.92) and BMI-adjusted waist-to-hip ratio (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.97) were positively associated with mortality. Also, overweight women whose WC was
PubMed ID
21860016 View in PubMed
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Change in body mass index during transition to statutory retirement: an occupational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287631
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 Jun 26;14(1):85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2017
Author
Sari Stenholm
Svetlana Solovieva
Eira Viikari-Juntura
Ville Aalto
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 Jun 26;14(1):85
Date
Jun-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Employment
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Transportation
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Work
Abstract
Retirement is a major life transition affecting health behaviors. The aim of this study was to examine within-individual changes in body mass index (BMI) during transition from full-time work to statutory retirement by sex and physical work characteristics.
A multiwave cohort study repeated every 4 years and data linkage to records from retirement registers. Participants were 5426 Finnish public-sector employees who retired on a statutory basis in 2000-2011 and who reported their body weight one to three times prior to (w-3, w-2, w-1), and one to three times after (w+1, w+2, w+3) retirement.
During the 4-year retirement transition (w+1, vs. w-1) men showed decline in BMI, which was most marked among men with sedentary work (-0.18?kg/m2, 95% CI -.30 to -0.05). In contrast, BMI increased during retirement transition in women and was most marked among women with diverse (0.14?kg/m2, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.20) or physically heavy work (0.31?kg/m2, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.45). Physical activity during leisure time or commuting to work, alcohol consumption or smoking did not explain the observed changes during retirement transition.
In this study statutory retirement was associated with small changes in BMI. Weight loss was most visible in men retiring from sedentary jobs and weight gain in women retiring from diverse and physically heavy jobs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28651597 View in PubMed
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Change in Neighborhood Disadvantage and Change in Smoking Behaviors in Adults: A Longitudinal, Within-individual Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289311
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 11; 27(6):803-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2016
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Anna Pulakka
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Pentti
Ichiro Kawachi
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
From the aFinnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; bDepartment of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; cSchool of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; dDepartment of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; eDepartment of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London Medical School, London, United Kingdom; fClinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; and gTurku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 11; 27(6):803-9
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Smoking - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Evidence for an association between neighborhood disadvantage and smoking is mixed and mainly based on cross-sectional studies. To shed light on the causality of this association, we examined whether change in neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with within-individual change in smoking behaviors.
The study population comprised participants of the Finnish Public Sector study who reported a change in their smoking behavior between surveys in 2008/2009 and 2012/2013. We linked participants' residential addresses to a total population database on neighborhood disadvantage with 250?×?250-m resolution. The outcome variables were changes in smoking status (being a smoker vs. not) as well as the intensity (heavy/moderate vs. light smoker). We used longitudinal case-crossover design, a method that accounts for time-invariant confounders by design. We adjusted models for time-varying covariates.
Of the 3,443 participants, 1,714 quit, while 967 began to smoke between surveys. Smoking intensity increased among 398 and decreased among 364 participants. The level of neighborhood disadvantage changed for 1,078 participants because they moved residence. Increased disadvantage was associated with increased odds of being a smoker (odds ratio of taking up smoking 1.23 [95% confidence interval: 1.2, 1.5] per 1 SD increase in standardized national disadvantage score). Odds ratio for being a heavy/moderate (vs. light) smoker was 1.14 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.52) when disadvantage increased by 1 SD.
These within-individual results link an increase in neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage, due to move in residence, with subsequent smoking behaviors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27337178 View in PubMed
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Change in organizational justice as a predictor of insomnia symptoms: longitudinal study analysing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292126
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1277-1284
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2017
Author
Tea Lallukka
Jaana I Halonen
Børge Sivertsen
Jaana Pentti
Sari Stenholm
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Tuula Oksanen
Marko Elovainio
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Turku & Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1277-1284
Date
08-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Social Justice
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Despite injustice at the workplace being a potential source of sleep problems, longitudinal evidence remains scarce. We examined whether changes in perceived organizational justice predicted changes in insomnia symptoms.
Data on 24 287 Finnish public sector employees (82% women), from three consecutive survey waves between 2000 and 2012, were treated as 'pseudo-trials'. Thus, the analysis of unfavourable changes in organizational justice included participants without insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, with high organizational justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 6307). In the analyses of favourable changes in justice, participants had insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, low justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 2903). In both analyses, the outcome was insomnia symptoms in Wave 3. We used generalized estimating equation models to analyse the data.
After adjusting for social and health-related covariates in Wave 1, unfavourable changes in relational organizational justice (i.e. fairness of managerial behaviours) were associated with increased odds of developing insomnia symptoms [odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.30]. A favourable change in relational organizational justice was associated with lower odds of persistent insomnia symptoms (odds ratio = 0.83; 95% CI 0.71-0.96). Changes in procedural justice (i.e. the fairness of decision-making procedures) were not associated with insomnia symptoms.
These data suggest that changes in perceived relational justice may affect employees' sleep quality. Decreases in the fairness of managerial behaviours were linked to increases in insomnia symptoms, whereas rises in fairness were associated with reduced insomnia symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28065888 View in PubMed
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