Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Autoantibodies to GAD, IA-2 and insulin in ICA-positive first-degree relatives of children with type 1 diabetes: a comparison between parents and siblings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31652
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2002 Jan-Feb;18(1):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sari Korhonen
Maria M Knip
Petri Kulmala
Kaisa Savola
Hans K Akerblom
Mikael Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2002 Jan-Feb;18(1):43-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoantibodies - blood
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
Insulin - immunology
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Nuclear Family
Parents
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Islet cell antibodies (ICA) represent a heterogenous group of autoantibodies to diabetes-associated antigens, including glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the IA-2 protein. The objectives of the present study were to compare the prevalence of autoantibodies to known biochemically characterized autoantigens between ICA-positive non-diabetic parents and siblings of children with type 1 diabetes and to evaluate how such antibodies explain ICA reactivity. METHODS: The presence and levels of GAD antibodies (GADA), IA-2 antibodies (IA-2A) and insulin autoantibodies (IAA) were analyzed in the sera of 184 ICA-positive first-degree relatives (79 parents and 105 siblings). RESULTS: The prevalences of GADA (61.9% in siblings vs 32.9% in parents), IA-2A (55.2% vs 15.2%) and IAA (41.0% vs 0%) were increased among ICA-positive siblings relative to ICA-positive parents (p
PubMed ID
11921417 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enterovirus infections are associated with the induction of beta-cell autoimmunity in a prospective birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187748
Source
J Med Virol. 2003 Jan;69(1):91-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Kimmo Salminen
Karita Sadeharju
Maria Lönnrot
Paula Vähäsalo
Antti Kupila
Sari Korhonen
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Heikki Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Center for Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes in Finland.
Source
J Med Virol. 2003 Jan;69(1):91-8
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae Infections - immunology - virology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology - immunology - virology
Enterovirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prospective Studies
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
Enterovirus infections have been associated with the manifestation of clinical type 1 diabetes in a number of reports, and recent prospective studies have suggested that enterovirus infections may initiate the autoimmune process, leading to the disease. In the present study, we analyzed the role of enterovirus infections in a Finnish birth cohort study, Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP), in which all newborn infants are screened for diabetes-associated HLA-DQB1 alleles, and those with an increased genetic risk are invited for prospective follow-up. Enterovirus infections were diagnosed by serology and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from serum samples taken from birth every 3-6 months. Case children included 41 infants who became positive for diabetes-associated autoantibodies during the observation. Control children comprised altogether 196 infants who remained autoantibody negative and were matched for the time of birth, sex, and HLA-DQB1 alleles. Enterovirus infections were more frequent in case children than in control children (P = 0.004), and the average enterovirus antibody levels were also higher in the case children (P = 0.003). Enterovirus infections were particularly frequent during the 6-month period preceding the first detection of autoantibodies: 51% of the case children compared with 28% of the control children had an infection in that time interval (P = 0.003). There was no difference in the frequency of adenovirus infections between the groups (P = 0.9). The present results imply that enterovirus infections are associated with the appearance of beta-cell autoantibodies. A possible causal relationship is supported by the clustering of infections to the time when autoantibodies appeared.
PubMed ID
12436483 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geographical variation in risk HLA-DQB1 genotypes for type 1 diabetes and signs of beta-cell autoimmunity in a high-incidence country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30491
Source
Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):676-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Marika Kukko
Suvi M Virtanen
Anna Toivonen
Satu Simell
Sari Korhonen
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simel
Mikael Knip
Author Affiliation
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Center for the Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes in Finland, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):676-81
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoantibodies - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Geography
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess possible differences in the frequency of HLA-DQB1 risk genotypes and the emergence of signs of beta-cell autoimmunity among three geographical regions in Finland. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The series comprised 4,642 children with increased HLA-DQB1-defined genetic risk of type 1 diabetes from the Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study: 1,793 (38.6%) born in Turku, 1,646 (35.5%) in Oulu, and 1,203 (25.9%) in Tampere. These children were examined frequently for the emergence of signs of beta-cell autoimmunity, for the primary screening of which islet cell antibodies (ICA) were used. If the child developed ICA, all samples were also analyzed for insulin autoantibodies (IAA), GAD65 antibodies (GADA), and antibodies to the IA-2 molecule (IA-2A). RESULTS: The high- and moderate-risk genotypes were unevenly distributed among the three areas (P
PubMed ID
14988284 View in PubMed
Less detail