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Health Canada's Food Directorate. Introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134097
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):696-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011

Overall prevalence of self-reported food allergy in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121901
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012 Oct;130(4):986-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012

A population-based study on peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy prevalence in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143708
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Jun;125(6):1327-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Moshe Ben-Shoshan
Daniel W Harrington
Lianne Soller
Joseph Fragapane
Lawrence Joseph
Yvan St Pierre
Samuel B Godefroy
Susan J Elliott
Susan J Elliot
Ann E Clarke
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. daliamoshebs@gmail.com
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Jun;125(6):1327-35
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arachis hypogaea - immunology
Canada
Child
Fishes - immunology
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nut Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Population
Prevalence
Sesamum - immunology
Shellfish - adverse effects
Skin Tests
Abstract
Recent studies suggest an increased prevalence of food-induced allergy and an increased incidence of food-related anaphylaxis. However, prevalence estimates of food allergies vary considerably between studies.
To determine the prevalence of peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy in Canada.
Using comparable methodology to Sicherer et al in the United States in 2002, we performed a cross-Canada, random telephone survey. Food allergy was defined as perceived (based on self-report), probable (based on convincing history or self-report of physician diagnosis), or confirmed (based on history and evidence of confirmatory tests).
Of 10,596 households surveyed in 2008 and 2009, 3666 responded (34.6% participation rate), of which 3613 completed the entire interview, representing 9667 individuals. The prevalence of perceived peanut allergy was 1.00% (95% CI, 0.80%-1.20%); tree nut, 1.22% (95% CI, 1.00%-1.44%); fish, 0.51% (95% CI, 0.37%-0.65%); shellfish, 1.60% (95% CI, 1.35%-1.86%); and sesame, 0.10% (95% CI, 0.04%-0.17%). The prevalence of probable allergy was 0.93% (95% CI, 0.74%-1.12%); 1.14% (95% CI, 0.92%-1.35%); 0.48% (95% CI, 0.34%-0.61%); 1.42% (95% CI, 1.18%-1.66%); and 0.09% (95% CI, 0.03%-0.15%), respectively. Because of the infrequency of confirmatory tests and the difficulty in obtaining results if performed, the prevalence of confirmed allergy was much lower.
This is the first nationwide Canadian study to determine the prevalence of severe food allergies. Our results indicate disparities between perceived and confirmed food allergy that might contribute to the wide range of published prevalence estimates.
Notes
Erratum In: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011 Mar;127(3):840Elliot, Susan J [corrected to Elliott, Susan J]
PubMed ID
20451985 View in PubMed
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