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Addressing the public health burden caused by the nutrition transition through the Healthy Foods North nutrition and lifestyle intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99759
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:120-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
S. Sharma
J. Gittelsohn
R. Rosol
L. Beck
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. sangitag@ualberta.ca
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:120-7
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Dietary inadequacies, low levels of physical activity, excessive energy intake and high obesity prevalence have placed Inuit and Inuvialuit populations of the Canadian Arctic at increased risk of chronic disease. An evidence-based, community participatory process was used to develop Healthy Foods North (HFN), a culturally appropriate nutrition and physical activity intervention programme that aimed to reduce risk of chronic disease and improve dietary adequacy amongst Inuit/Inuvialuit in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. HFN was implemented over the course of 12 months in a series of seven phases between October 2008 and 2009 (Nunavut) and June 2008 and 2009 (Northwest Territories). Combining behaviour change and environmental strategies to increase both the availability of healthful food choices in local shops and opportunities for increasing physical activity, HFN promoted the consumption of traditional foods and nutrient-dense and/or low energy shop-bought foods, utilisation of preparation methods that do not add fat content, decreased consumption of high-energy shop-bought foods, and increased physical activity. Messages identified in the community workshops, such as the importance of family eating and sharing, were emphasised throughout the intervention. Intervention components were conducted by community staff and included working with shops to increase the stocking of healthy foods, point of purchase signage and promotion in shops and community settings, pedometer challenges in the workplace and use of community media (e.g. radio and cable television advertisements) to reinforce key messages. HFN represents an innovative multilevel approach to the reduction of chronic disease risk factors amongst Inuit and Inuvialuit, based on strong collaboration with local agencies, government and institutions.
PubMed ID
21158971 View in PubMed
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Assessing diet and lifestyle in the Canadian Arctic Inuit and Inuvialuit to inform a nutrition and physical activity intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99760
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
REVIEW Assessing diet and lifestyle in the Canadian Arctic Inuit and Inuvialuit to inform a nutrition and physical activity intervention programme S. Sharma Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background Aboriginal populations of the Canadian Arctic The
  1 document  
Author
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. sangitag@ualberta.ca
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-17
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
6474495
Keywords
Arctic
Chronic Disease
Dietary and lifestyle transition
Environmental change
Aboriginal health
Abstract
Inuit in Nunavut (NU) and Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, were traditionally nomadic peoples whose culture and lifestyle were founded on hunting and gathering foods from the local environment, primarily land and marine mammals. Lifestyle changes within the last century have brought about a rapid nutrition transition, characterised by decreasing consumption of traditional foods and an associated increase in the consumption of processed, shop-bought foods. This transition may be attributed to a multitude of factors, such as acculturation, overall food access and availability, food insecurity and climate change. Obesity and risk for chronic disease are higher in the Canadian Arctic population compared with the Canadian national average. This present review describes the study population and methodologies used to collect data in order to study the nutrition transition amongst Aboriginal Arctic populations and develop Healthy Foods North (HFN), a novel, multi-institutional and culturally appropriate programme that aims to improve dietary adequacy and reduce risk of chronic disease. Included in this special issue of the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics are papers describing dietary intake patterns, physical activity levels, dietary behaviours, chronic disease prevalence and psychosocial factors that potentially mediate behaviour. A further paper describes how these data were utilised to inform and develop Healthy Foods North.
PubMed ID
21158957 View in PubMed
Documents
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Assessment of dietary adequacy in a remote Inuvialuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138238
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
E. Erber
B N Hopping
L. Beck
T. Sheehy
E. De Roose
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:35-42
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Diet - ethnology
Dietary Fiber
Eating - ethnology
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Vitamins
Young Adult
Abstract
Traditional foods are rich sources of essential nutrients, but Inuvialuit in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, have been undergoing a nutrition transition, characterised by an increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods. The present study aimed to characterise energy, nutrient and food intakes amongst adult Inuvialuit.
The study collected up to three 24-h dietary recalls on nonconsecutive days for each participant in spring/summer of 2008 in one remote community in the NWT. Recall data were analysed for energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, most commonly reported foods, and food contributors to energy and nutrients.
Participants included 14 men and 50 women (response rate 79%). Median daily energy intake was 9.4 (interquartile range=5.7) MJ for men and 8.3 (3.6) MJ for women. The majority of adult Inuvialuit did not meet the recommendation for vitamins A [median intake=344.7 (246.3) ?g-RAE in men, 248.9 (213.8) ?g-RAE in women], B(6) [0.9 (0.8) mg in men, 1.0 (0.5) mg in women] and E [2.4 (2.1) mg in men, 1.8 (1.0) mg in women], dietary fibre [7.7 (5.7) g in men, 8.7 (4.4) g in women], calcium [779.6 (842.0) mg in men, 610.4 (431.5) mg in women] and total folate [222.6 (57.7) ?g in men, 264.6 (127.5) ?g in women]. Vitamin D intake was below the recommendation for most women [median intake=100.0 (119.2) IU]. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake. Juices were the main contributors to energy, carbohydrate and calcium.
The present study revealed an inadequate consumption of essential nutrients in an Inuvialuit population. If these nutrient deficiencies continue, this population will face an increased burden of chronic diseases and malnutrition.
PubMed ID
21158960 View in PubMed
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Assessment of supplement use (including vitamin D) in Inuvialuit adults in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118581
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Apr;26(2):169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
S K Kozicky
N. Mathe
J L Butler
T M Hébert
A. Corriveau
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Apr;26(2):169-74
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuvialuit of Arctic Canada are at high risk for inadequate vitamin D status as a result of rapid dietary transitions and a lack of solar ultraviolet B exposure. This may have implications for the development of adverse skeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Data are limited regarding supplement use in Arctic Aboriginal populations. The present study aimed to describe the type and extent of supplement use, emphasising vitamin D, and to identify differences between supplement users and non-users.
Supplement information was collected from a population-specific quantitative food frequency questionnaire in three communities in the Northwest Territories, Canada, as part of a cross-sectional study. Data were analysed for frequency of supplementation and types of supplements. Users and non-users were compared in terms of age, sex, body mass index, education, marital status, income support, employment and chronic disease diagnosis using nonparametric tests and the chi-squared test.
Response rates ranged from 65% to 85%. Included in the analysis were 192 Inuvialuit (45 males, 147 females) with a mean (SD) age of 43.6 (13.9)?years. Twenty-three percent reported using a supplement, with multivitamins being the most common. Three percent indicated taking a vitamin D-containing supplement. No significant differences between supplement users and non-users were found.
Despite limited sun exposure for many months of the year, a small proportion of Inuvialuit adults were using supplements, and specifically vitamin D-containing supplements. Future population-based intervention strategies should promote consumption of vitamin D rich foods and encourage the use of vitamin D supplements if diet alone is unable to meet recommendations.
PubMed ID
23190418 View in PubMed
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Awareness of chronic disease diagnosis amongst family members is associated with healthy dietary knowledge but not behaviour amongst Inuit in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138230
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:100-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
M. Pakseresht
E. Mead
J. Gittelsohn
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:100-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Eating - ethnology
Energy Intake - ethnology
Family
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - ethnology
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Nunavut - epidemiology
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The extent to which awareness of chronic disease (CD) diagnosis affects one's healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions or healthy dietary and physical activity (PA) behaviours remains unexplored among Inuit in Canada.
A food frequency questionnaire and an adult impact questionnaire were used in a cross-sectional study to collect self-reported data on daily energy and nutrient intake, PA and the diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and cancer amongst adult Inuit and their family members. Associations between awareness of personal and family CD status and healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions, percentage of energy consumed from non-nutrient-dense foods and PA were assessed via ordinal logistic regression.
Of the 266 participants, those who self-reported CD for both themselves and their relative(s) were more likely to have high healthy food knowledge [odds ratio (OR)=2.45] than those who did not. Reporting hypertension and heart disease amongst only relatives increased the likelihood of high knowledge (OR=5.20) and intentions (OR=5.10) for healthy eating. Heart disease in both participants and their relatives was associated with high levels of PA (OR=12.24). However, there were no associations when only participants (but not their relatives) reported having CD. A joint effect between a high level of education and awareness of CD was positively related to high food knowledge (OR=38.93). An inverse association between awareness of CD and unhealthy eating was not observed.
Awareness of a relative having a CD was a more important factor in increasing knowledge and, to a lesser degree, self-efficacy or intentions to eat healthy than participants' awareness of personal CD. However, awareness was not associated with lower non-nutrient-dense food intake.
PubMed ID
21158968 View in PubMed
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Current treatment by United States and Canadian pediatric rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200794
Source
J Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;26(9):2036-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
R Q Cron
S. Sharma
D D Sherry
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;26(9):2036-8
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Juvenile - drug therapy
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Pediatrics - standards - trends
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
United States
Abstract
To determine current treatment practices for 11 selected pediatric rheumatic diseases.
A questionnaire was mailed to 224 US and Canadian physicians who were listed in membership directories that included pediatric rheumatologists.
One hundred seventy-four questionnaires (78%) were returned. Board certified pediatricians accounted for 86% of respondents. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were the most commonly used medicines for all forms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), seronegative enthesopathy and arthropathy syndrome (SEA), and Henoch-Schönlein purpura, whereas oral corticosteroids were most frequently used for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile dermatomyositis, polyarteritis nodosa, and sarcoidosis. Intraarticular corticosteroid injection was the second most common therapy for pauciarticular JRA, but methotrexate (MTX) was second for polyarticular and systemic onset forms of JRA, and sulfasalazine was second for SEA. For all diseases, MTX was administered orally roughly twice as often as subcutaneously. In treating SLE, cyclophosphamide was used more frequently than azathioprine, cyclosporin A, or intravenous immunoglobulin.
The results from this survey should allow individual practitioners to compare their treatment patterns to pediatric rheumatologists in the US and Canada as a whole.
PubMed ID
10493688 View in PubMed
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Development of a food frequency questionnaire to measure dietary intake in an Alaskan Native population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286391
Source
Page 338 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
J.S. Johnson
E. Asay
X. Cao
E. Mead
S. Sharma
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
Author Affiliation
0ffice of Wellness and Prevention, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, C-DCHS, Anchorage, AK
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Affiliation during research: Cancer Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, current affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Page 338 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Dietary adequacy and alcohol consumption of Inuvialuit women of child-bearing age in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114846
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Dec;26(6):570-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
F. Kolahdooz
K. Spearing
A. Corriveau
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Dec;26(6):570-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Arctic Regions
Body mass index
Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Inuits
Malnutrition - ethnology
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Nutritive Value
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies highlight a possible association between alcohol-drinking patterns and dietary inadequacies, which may have negative implications, particularly for women of child-bearing age. The present study aimed to compare dietary adequacy among alcohol drinkers versus nondrinkers in Inuvialuit women of child-bearing age.
A cross-sectional survey of 92 randomly selected women of childbearing age (19-44 years) was conducted in three communities in the Northwest Territories of Arctic Canada, using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Data were analysed to compare mean daily energy and nutrient intakes, dietary adequacy and nutrient densities (per 4184 kJ) between alcohol drinkers and nondrinkers, as well as heavy drinkers and nonheavy drinkers, using the nonparametric Wilcoxen rank sum test.
The response rate was between 65% and 85% depending on the community sampled. Of the study participants, 54% (n = 49) were drinkers and 46% (n = 42) were nondrinkers. Of the drinkers, 45% (n = 22) were heavy drinkers. Mean energy intakes were high among all women, although they were significantly higher among drinkers [17,179 kJ (4106 kcal)] compared to nondrinkers [13,317 kJ (3183 kcal)]. There were no significant differences in nutrient intake between the two groups; however, drinkers had a lower nutrient density for most nutrients. Heavy drinkers had a significantly lower nutrient density for all nutrients, except protein, iron, and vitamins B6 , C and D, compared to nonheavy drinkers.
The findings of the present study provide evidence of inadequate dietary intake among Inuvialuit of child-bearing age, regardless of alcohol-drinking behaviour.
PubMed ID
23574376 View in PubMed
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Dietary adequacy of Inuit in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138239
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
RESEARCH PAPER Dietary adequacy of Inuit in the Canadian Arctic B. N. Hopping,* E. Mead,* E. Erber,* C. Sheehy,� C. Roache� & S. Sharma§ *Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA �School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College
  1 document  
Author
B N Hopping
E. Mead
E. Erber
C. Sheehy
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:27-34
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
217596
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Dietary Fiber
Eating - ethnology
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Nunavut - epidemiology
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Vitamins
Young Adult
Abstract
Food intake amongst Canadian Inuit is currently in transition with a concurrent increase in diet-related chronic disease. There is a lack of current data on nutrient intake and dietary adequacy in this population. The present study aimed to assess dietary intake and adequacy amongst Inuit adults in a community in Nunavut, Canada.
Random sampling of 130 households in a remote Inuit community in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut, Canada, was used for this cross-sectional study. Up to three 24-h dietary recalls were collected on nonconsecutive days, capturing weekday and weekend consumption. Data were analysed to estimate energy and nutrient intake, to determine dietary adequacy, and to summarise the most commonly reported foods and the top food contributors to selected nutrients.
The response rate was 69%, with 75 Inuit adults participating (mean (standard deviation (SD)) age 44 (SD=17) years). Mean (SD) daily energy intake was 9.3 (4.4) MJ and 8.7 (3.5) MJ for men and women, respectively. Intakes of dietary fibre, calcium, total folate and vitamins A, D and E were below the Dietary Reference Intakes (Estimated Average Requirements where available) for 60-100% of all men and women. Traditional foods contributed substantially to protein and iron intake, whilst shop-bought foods were primary contributors to total fat, carbohydrate and sugar intake.
The present study reports an in-depth assessment of total dietary quality amongst Inuit adults in Nunavut, Canada. The results obtained indicate inadequate intakes of several essential nutrients, as well as a reliance on a nontraditional diet. A nutrition intervention is needed to prevent a continued rise in diet-related chronic disease incidence.
PubMed ID
21158959 View in PubMed
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Differences in dietary quality and adequacy by smoking status among a Canadian Aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124497
Source
Public Health. 2012 Jun;126(6):490-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
S E Rittmueller
A. Corriveau
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 1-126 Li Ka Shing Centre for Health Research Innovation, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
Public Health. 2012 Jun;126(6):490-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutritional Status - ethnology
Questionnaires
Smoking - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
To assess dietary adequacy and quality among Inuvialuit smokers compared with non-smokers in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada.
Cross-sectional study.
A validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered between July 2007 and July 2008 to individuals of randomly selected households in three NWT communities to capture dietary intake and smoking habits over a 30-day recall period. Daily energy and nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, and the top food contributors to energy and selected nutrients were determined by smoking status.
Intakes of energy and several nutrients were higher among male and female smokers compared with non-smokers. Male smokers had similar daily nutrient density (per 1000 kcal consumed) of all nutrients. Female smokers had significantly lower intake densities of protein, fibre, folate, magnesium, vitamin D, vitamin E (P = 0.05) and thiamin (P = 0.01), and higher intake densities of sugar and vitamins C and K (P = 0.05). Among male and female smokers, more than 50% had inadequate intakes of fibre, potassium and vitamin E. Non-nutrient-dense foods contributed similar amounts to energy intake, and traditional foods contributed 3-6% less to energy and protein intakes among smokers compared with non-smokers.
Adult Inuvialuit smokers had higher caloric intake and lower dietary quality, including less consumption of traditional foods, compared with non-smokers. Fewer dietary inadequacies were observed among smokers than non-smokers, which may be due to higher energy intake among smokers.
PubMed ID
22575707 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.