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Effect of cigarette smoking on recurrence of Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229176
Source
Gastroenterology. 1990 May;98(5 Pt 1):1123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
L R Sutherland
S. Ramcharan
H. Bryant
G. Fick
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Gastroenterology. 1990 May;98(5 Pt 1):1123-8
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Reoperation
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
The effect of cigarette smoking on recurrence (defined in this study as the need for repeat surgery) in patients who had previously required surgery for Crohn's disease was assessed in a historical cohort of 174 patients. Mean follow-up was 10.8 yr. The 5- and 10-yr recurrence rates were 28% and 56%, respectively. Five- and 10-yr rates were significantly different for smokers (36%, 70%) and nonsmokers (20%, 41%). When patients were stratified by gender, the increased risk was more apparent in women (odds ratio 4.2, 95% confidence interval 2.0-4.2) than in men (odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 0.8-6.0). Evidence for a dose-response relationship could be identified in women but not men. Cigarette smoking may not only be a risk factor for development of Crohn's disease but also may influence disease activity following surgery.
PubMed ID
2323505 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of premenstrual symptoms in a population-based sample of 2650 urban women: attributable risk and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224051
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1992 Apr;45(4):377-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
S. Ramcharan
E J Love
G H Fick
A. Goldfien
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1992 Apr;45(4):377-92
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Menstrual Cycle
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Premenstrual Syndrome - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychological Tests
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Urban Population
Abstract
This epidemiologic survey achieved a reliable measure of the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms by avoiding the biases of small or selected samples, anamnestic error, and subjective expectation. From 6232 women (a 78.8% response), aged 20-49 years, identified through a random sample of urban households, the 24-hour prevalence of symptoms was obtained using the Moos' Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, administered without reference to the menstrual cycle. For 71% of the naturally cycling women, current cycle phase was determined by follow-up (n = 2650); but a higher prevalence of severe or moderately severe affective symptoms in the premenstrual compared to the mid-cycle phase was not found. However, observed risk factor interactions led to the conclusion that premenstrual distress is a discrete mood disorder, affecting women aged 25-35 years, with probable ovulatory cycles, and vulnerable to stress; and that the risk of affective symptoms attributable to the premenstrual state was one percent.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Epidemiol. 1993 Apr;46(4):406-88483006
PubMed ID
1569434 View in PubMed
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The relationship between chinook conditions and women's illness-related behaviours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73076
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1995 Mar;38(3):156-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
M S Rose
M J Verhoef
S. Ramcharan
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1995 Mar;38(3):156-60
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - etiology
Alberta - epidemiology
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Sick Role
Wind
Abstract
The objective of this study was to (1) to describe the relationship between chinook conditions and illness related behaviour in women, aged 20-49 years, and (2) to examine the possibility of the existence of subgroups of chinook-sensitive women. At present no empirical evidence is available regarding a relationship between chinook conditions and illness related behaviours. This study comprises the secondary analysis of a large survey of various health and health-related factors of urban women aged 20-49 years, carried out in 1985-1986 in Calgary. The interview date was used to link behaviours to chinook conditions. We found no evidence of a significant relationship between the behaviours investigated and chinook conditions in the general population. However, the data strongly supported the concept of chinook sensitivity. Women with a history of chronic health problems were more likely to visit a health care professional on chinook days than healthy women and women in the subgroup aged less than 35 years cut down their usual daily activities during chinook conditions. Women with a history of recurring migraine headaches were less likely to take prescription medication on chinook days, and women with a history of emotional disorders were more likely to have higher scores on the accident scale and to report bursts of energy or excitement during chinook days. More research is needed to identify subgroups of susceptible persons, as well as to determine whether chinook sensitive persons are equally susceptible to weather changer of other types.
PubMed ID
7744532 View in PubMed
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The relationship between chinook conditions and women's physical and mental well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73077
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1995 Mar;38(3):148-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
M J Verhoef
M S Rose
S. Ramcharan
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1995 Mar;38(3):148-51
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - etiology
Alberta - epidemiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Skin Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Wind
Abstract
The objective of this study was (1) to determine the relationship between chinook conditions and physical and psychological symptoms in women aged 20-49 years, and (2) to examine the possibility of subgroups of chinook-sensitive women. The evidence for this relationship is at present merely anecdotal. The study carried out in 1985-1986 in Calgary comprises the secondary analysis of a large survey of various health and health-related factors, including different symptoms, of urban women aged 20-49 years. The interview date was used to link these data to days on which pre-chinook, chinook, post-chinook and non-chinook conditions occurred. Between November 1, 1985 and February 28, 1986, 182 women were interviewed on pre-chinook days, 74 on chinook days, 229 on post-chinook days and 886 on non-chinook days. Autonomic reactions and skin disorders were found to be significantly related to chinook conditions. None of the psychological symptoms was related to chinook conditions. However, a significant relationship was found between symptoms and chinook conditions in women with a history of emotional disorders. This type of information is important to educate chinook-sensitive women and health professionals as well as for hospital emergency departments in order to be able to prepare for potential increases in workload.
PubMed ID
7744530 View in PubMed
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