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39 records – page 1 of 4.

[A comment: the core question for obese persons is quality of life. The Malmö study should not result in therapeutic nihilism].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197995
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2648
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2000
Author
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus. stephan.rossner@medhs.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2648
Date
May-24-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Obesity - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden
Weight Loss
PubMed ID
10881530 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adipose tissue morphology predicts improved insulin sensitivity following moderate or pronounced weight loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272781
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
D. Eriksson-Hogling
D P Andersson
J. Bäckdahl
J. Hoffstedt
S. Rössner
A. Thorell
E. Arner
P. Arner
M. Rydén
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipocytes - metabolism - pathology
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism - pathology
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cell Enlargement
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Diet, Reducing
Female
Humans
Inflammation - etiology - metabolism
Male
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology - surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies show that white adipose tissue hypertrophy (few, large adipocytes), in contrast to hyperplasia (many, small adipocytes), associates with insulin resistance and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated if baseline adipose cellularity could predict improvements in insulin sensitivity following weight loss.
Plasma samples and subcutaneous abdominal adipose biopsies were examined in 100 overweight or obese individuals before and 10 weeks after a hypocaloric diet (7±3% weight loss) and in 61 obese subjects before and 2 years after gastric by-pass surgery (33±9% weight loss). The degree of adipose tissue hypertrophy or hyperplasia (termed the morphology value) in each individual was calculated on the basis of the relationship between fat cell volume and total fat mass. Insulin sensitivity was determined by homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMAIR).
In both cohorts at baseline, subjects with hypertrophy displayed significantly higher fasting plasma insulin and HOMAIR values than subjects with hyperplasia (P
PubMed ID
25666530 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1819
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1996
Author
S. Rössner
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1819
Date
May-8-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diet, Reducing
Humans
PubMed ID
8667809 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A referral for exercise? No shortage of life style programs in the databases, but the information can't be efficiently used in practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49945
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Mar 1;97(9):981-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2000

[Board of Social Welfare, Institute for Public Health, Food Administration and Consumer Protection Department--what are all of you doing to control ineffective weight reducing products?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222710
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Nov 25;89(48):4132-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-1992

Body mass distribution of a representative adult population in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103519
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1990;10 Suppl 1:S37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Kuskowska-Wolk
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Health Behaviour Research Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1990;10 Suppl 1:S37-41
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2286149 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body weight characteristics of subjects on asthma medication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15550
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24(9):1217-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
A. Hedberg
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Centre for Epidemiology, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.hedberg@sos.se
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24(9):1217-25
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - adverse effects
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - adverse effects
Asthma - drug therapy
Body mass index
Body Weight
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Steroids
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Weight gain is a frequently documented side effect after long-term anti-inflammatory treatment with systemic corticosteroid drugs in patients with asthma. In recent years new types of inhaled corticosteroids have been introduced, which act locally and are more rapidly bio-transformed. Even such corticosteroids may have a detectable, clinically relevant systemic side effect on weight. The aim of this study is to investigate if there is any relationship between body weight and asthma medication. DESIGN: The relationship between asthma medication and body weight was analysed in two combined randomized samples of the adult Swedish population 16-60 y of age (n = 17,912). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out to obtain estimates for (1) body mass index (BMI) indicating 'obesity' (BMI > 29.9 kg/m2) in men and women controlling for self-reported asthma medication, and (2) self-reported asthma medication controlling for BMI. In both cases we furthermore controlled for interview period, age, Swedish region, smoking habits, physical activities and level of education. RESULTS: We found no significantly higher odds for obesity in men (OR = 1.21 (0.55-2.64) or women (OR = 1.97 (0.89-4.38) on asthma medication compared to men and women with pharmacologically untreated asthma even after adjustment for smoking habits, physical activities, level of education and other related co-variables. However, we found significant positive associations between obesity and interview period, age and former smoking and inverse significant relationships with the degree of physical activity. We also found significantly higher adjusted odds for asthma, indicated by self-reported asthma medication, in women (OR = 2.74 (1.91-3.91)) but not in men (OR = 1.57 (0.96-2.56)) with BMI indicating 'obesity'. CONCLUSION: There is no strong evidence to suggest that modern pharmacological asthma treatment may contribute much to the development of obesity in either men or women on asthma medication. Adjustment for smoking habits, physical activities, level of education and other related co-variables have minor effects on these relationships. Obesity may still be an independent risk factor for asthma since we observed significantly higher odds for self-reported asthma medication in women and an almost significant relationship in men even after control for BMI and other related co-variables.
PubMed ID
11033994 View in PubMed
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[Body weight of the Swedish population is increasing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223586
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 17;89(25):2282-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-1992
Author
A. Kuskowska-Wolk
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 17;89(25):2282-4
Date
Jun-17-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
1630267 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood obesity and adulthood consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33984
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Jan;87(1):1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Obesity Unit, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Jan;87(1):1-5
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Exercise
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Life Style
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - therapy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide both for adults and children. Although obesity has underlying genetic causes, possibly explaining about 50% of the body weight variation, the dramatic recent increase must be due to behavioural reasons. Lifestyle questions must be addressed if new preventive and treatment strategies are to be developed. Since many obese children grow into obese adults with high risks for complications and a low quality of life, more aggressive treatment methods for the obese child could be envisaged.
PubMed ID
9510438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decreased social activity in obese adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103522
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1990;10 Suppl 1:S265-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Kuskowska-Wolk
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Health Behaviour Research Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1990;10 Suppl 1:S265-9
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Population
Social Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2286142 View in PubMed
Less detail

39 records – page 1 of 4.