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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
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Associations among disease conditions, bone mineral density, and prevalent vertebral deformities in men and women 50 years of age and older: cross-sectional results from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186024
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Apr;18(4):784-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
D A Hanley
J P Brown
A. Tenenhouse
W P Olszynski
G. Ioannidis
C. Berger
J C Prior
L. Pickard
T M Murray
T. Anastassiades
S. Kirkland
C. Joyce
L. Joseph
A. Papaioannou
S A Jackson
S. Poliquin
J D Adachi
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary. Calgary, Alberta, Canada. dahanley@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Apr;18(4):784-90
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Kidney Calculi - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Osteitis Deformans - complications
Osteoporosis - complications - epidemiology
Spine - abnormalities
Abstract
This cross-sectional cohort study of 5566 women and 2187 men 50 years of age and older in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study was conducted to determine whether reported past diseases are associated with bone mineral density or prevalent vertebral deformities. We examined 12 self-reported disease conditions including diabetes mellitus (types 1 or 2), nephrolithiasis, hypertension, heart attack, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, breast cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, neuromuscular disease, Paget's disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine whether there were associations among these disease conditions and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and trochanter, as well as prevalent vertebral deformities. Bone mineral density measurements were higher in women and men with type 2 diabetes compared with those without after appropriate adjustments. The differences were most notable at the lumbar spine (+0.053 g/cm2), femoral neck (+0.028 g/cm2), and trochanter (+0.025 g/cm2) in women, and at the femoral neck (+0.025 g/cm2) in men. Hypertension was also associated with higher bone mineral density measurements for both women and men. The differences were most pronounced at the lumbar spine (+0.022 g/cm2) and femoral neck (+0.007 g/cm2) in women and at the lumbar spine (+0.028 g/cm2) in men. Although results were statistically inconclusive, men reporting versus not reporting past nephrolithiasis appeared to have clinically relevant lower bone mineral density values. Bone mineral density differences were -0.022, -0.015, and -0.016 g/cm2 at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and trochanter, respectively. Disease conditions were not strongly associated with vertebral deformities. In summary, these cross-sectional population-based data show that type 2 diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher bone mineral density in women and men, and nephrolithiasis may be associated with lower bone mineral density in men. The importance of these associations for osteoporosis case finding and management require further and prospective studies.
PubMed ID
12674340 View in PubMed
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Canadian normative data for the SF-36 health survey. Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study Research Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197488
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2000
Author
W M Hopman
T. Towheed
T. Anastassiades
A. Tenenhouse
S. Poliquin
C. Berger
L. Joseph
J P Brown
T M Murray
J D Adachi
D A Hanley
E. Papadimitropoulos
Author Affiliation
MacKenzie Health Services Research Group, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. hopmanw@post.queensu.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):265-71
Date
Aug-8-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (SF-36) is a widely used measure of health-related quality of life. Normative data are the key to determining whether a group or an individual scores above or below the average for their country, age or sex. Published norms for the SF-36 exist for other countries but have not been previously published for Canada.
The Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study is a prospective cohort study involving 9423 randomly selected Canadian men and women aged 25 years or more living in the community. The sample was drawn within a 50-km radius of 9 Canadian cities, and the information collected included the SF-36 as a measure of health-related quality of life. This provided a unique opportunity to develop age- and sex-adjusted normative data for the Canadian population.
Canadian men scored substantially higher than women on all 8 domains and the 2 summary component scales of the SF-36. Canadians scored higher than their US counterparts on all SF-36 domains and both summary component scales and scored higher than their UK counterparts on 4 domains, although many of the differences are not large.
The differences in the SF-36 scores between age groups, sexes and countries confirm that these Canadian norms are necessary for comparative purposes. The data will be useful for assessing the health status of the general population and of patient populations, and the effect of interventions on health-related quality of life.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):283-410951725
PubMed ID
10951722 View in PubMed
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Estimation of the prevalence of low bone density in Canadian women and men using a population-specific DXA reference standard: the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195810
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(10):897-904
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A. Tenenhouse
L. Joseph
N. Kreiger
S. Poliquin
T M Murray
L. Blondeau
C. Berger
D A Hanley
J C Prior
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(10):897-904
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Femur Neck - physiology - physiopathology
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - physiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Abstract
The Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) is a prospective cohort study which will measure the incidence and prevalence of osteoporosis and fractures, and the effect of putative risk factors, in a random sample of 10,061 women and men aged > or = 25 years recruited in approximately equal numbers in nine centers across Canada. In this paper we report the results of studies to establish peak bone mass (PBM) which would be appropriate reference data for use in Canada. These reference data are used to estimate the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in Canadian women and men aged > or = 50 years. Participants were recruited via randomly selected household telephone listings. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry using Hologic QDR 1000 or 2000 or Lunar DPX densitometers. BMD results for lumbar spine and femoral neck were converted to a Hologic base. BMD of the lumbar spine in 578 women and 467 men was constant to age 39 years giving a PBM of 1.042 +/- 0.121 g/cm2 for women and 1.058 +/- 0.127 g/cm2 for men. BMD at the femoral neck declined from age 29 years. The mean femoral neck BMD between 25 and 29 years was taken as PBM and was found to be 0.857 +/- 0.125 g/cm2 for women and 0.910 +/- 0.125 g/cm2 for men. Prevalence of osteoporosis, as defined by WHO criteria, in Canadian women aged > or = 50 years was 12.1% at the lumbar spine and 7.9% at the femoral neck with a combined prevalence of 15.8%. In men it was 2.9% at the lumbar spine and 4.8% at the femoral neck with a combined prevalence of 6.6%.
PubMed ID
11199195 View in PubMed
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The influence of osteoporotic fractures on health-related quality of life in community-dwelling men and women across Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191865
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(11):903-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J D Adachi
G. Loannidis
C. Berger
L. Joseph
A. Papaioannou
L. Pickard
E A Papadimitropoulos
W. Hopman
S. Poliquin
J C Prior
D A Hanley
W P Olszynski
T. Anastassiades
J P Brown
T. Murray
S A Jackson
A. Tenenhouse
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, St Joseph's Hospital, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario Canada.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(11):903-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fractures, Bone - etiology
Health status
Hip Fractures - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Osteoporosis - complications
Pelvic Bones - injuries
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Rib Fractures - etiology
Spinal Fractures - etiology
Wrist Injuries - etiology
Abstract
Health-related quality of life (HRQL) was examined in relation to prevalent fractures in 4816 community-dwelling Canadian men and women 50 years and older participating in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Fractures were of three categories: clinically recognized main fractures, subclinical vertebral fractures and fractures at other sites. Main fractures were divided and analyzed at the hip, spine, wrist/forearm, pelvis and rib sites. Baseline assessments of anthropometric data, medical history, therapeutic drug use, spinal radiographs and prevalent fractures were obtained from all participants. The SF-36 instrument was used as a tool to measure HRQL. A total of 652 (13.5%) main fractures were reported. Results indicated that hip, spine, wrist/forearm, pelvis and rib fractures had occurred in 78 (1.6%), 40 (0.8%), 390 (8.1%), 19 (0.4%) and 125 (2.6%) individuals, respectively (subjects may have had more than one main fracture). Subjects who had experienced a main prevalent fracture had lower HRQL scores compared with non-fractured participants. The largest differences were observed in the physical functioning (-4.0; 95% confidence intervals (CI): -6.0, -2.0) and role-physical functioning domains (-5.8; 95% CI: -9.5, -2.2). In women, the physical functioning domain was most influenced by hip (-14.9%; 95% CI: -20.9, -9.0) and pelvis (-18.1; 95% CI: -27.6, -8.6) fractures. In men, the role-physical domain was most affected by hip fractures (-35.7; 95% CI: -60.4, -11.1). Subjects who experienced subclinical vertebral fractures had lower HRQL scores than those without prevalent fractures. In conclusion, HRQL was lower in the physical functioning domain in women and the role-physical domain in men who sustained main fractures at the hip. Subclinical vertebral fractures exerted a moderate effect on HRQL.
PubMed ID
11804016 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal changes in calcium and vitamin D intakes and relationship to bone mineral density in a prospective population-based study: the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105893
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2013 Dec;13(4):470-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
W. Zhou
L. Langsetmo
C. Berger
S. Poliquin
N. Kreiger
S I Barr
S M Kaiser
R G Josse
J C Prior
T E Towheed
T. Anastassiades
K S Davison
C S Kovacs
D A Hanley
E A Papadimitropoulos
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
CaMos Coordinating Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2013 Dec;13(4):470-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - physiology
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Dietary Supplements
Female
Femur Neck - radiography
Hip - radiography
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - radiography
Prospective Studies
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Our objective was to study changes in calcium and vitamin D intakes over time, and their cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with bone mineral density (BMD).
We followed 9382 women and men aged =25 and 899 aged 16-24, for 10 and 2 years respectively.
Calcium and vitamin D intakes increased over time in adults, but decreased in women aged 16-18. The increased intakes in adults were largely attributable to the increased use of calcium and/or vitamin D supplements. Both the percentage of supplement users and average dose among users increased over time. There was nevertheless a high prevalence of calcium and vitamin D intake below the estimated average requirement. At baseline, higher calcium and vitamin D intakes were associated with higher total hip and femoral neck BMD in young men, and cumulatively high levels of calcium and vitamin D intakes over time contributed to better BMD maintenance at lumbar spine and hip sites in adult women.
Although total intakes, particularly of vitamin D, frequently fell below the Institute of Medicine recommendations despite an increase over time in supplement use, we found some positive associations between total calcium and vitamin D intake and bone health.
PubMed ID
24292617 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.