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Genetic effects in common on maximal walking speed and muscle performance in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163550
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2007 Jun;17(3):274-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
K. Tiainen
S. Pajala
S. Sipilä
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
M. Alén
E. Heikkinen
A. Tolvanen
T. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. tiainen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2007 Jun;17(3):274-80
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acceleration
Aged
Female
Finland
Genetics, Medical
Humans
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal
Task Performance and Analysis
Twin Studies as Topic
Walking
Abstract
The purpose was to examine whether maximal walking speed, maximal isometric knee extensor strength, and leg extensor power share genetic or environmental effects in common. The data was collected from 103 monozygotic and 114 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63-76 years. Maximal walking speed over 10 m was measured in the laboratory corridor using photocells for timing. Isometric knee extensor strength and leg extensor power were measured using an adjustable dynamometer. The genetic models showed that strength, power, and walking speed had a genetic effect in common which accounted for 52% of the variance in strength, 36% in power, and 34% in walking speed. Strength and power had a non-shared environmental effect in common explaining 13% of variation in strength and 14% in power. The remaining variance was accounted for by trait-specific effects. Some people may be more prone to functional limitation in old age due to their genetic disposition, but this does not rule out that changes in the lifestyle of predisposed subjects may also have a major effect. Approximately half of the variation in each trait was explained by environmental effects, which suggests the importance of the physical activity to improve performance and prevent functional limitation.
PubMed ID
17501868 View in PubMed
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Lifelong physical activity in maintaining bone strength in older men and women of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128101
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2012 Sep;23(9):2303-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
N J Rianon
T F Lang
G. Sigurdsson
G. Eiriksdottir
S. Sigurdsson
M. Garcia
S. Pajala
A. Koster
B. Yu
B J Selwyn
W C Taylor
A S Kapadia
V. Gudnason
L J Launer
T B Harris
Author Affiliation
Family and Community Medicine, UTHSC Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Nahid.J.Rianon@uth.tmc.edu
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2012 Sep;23(9):2303-12
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Female
Femur - physiology - radiography
Humans
Life Style
Lumbar Vertebrae - physiology - radiography
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
We examined if lifelong physical activity is important for maintaining bone strength in the elderly. Associations of quantitative computerized tomography-acquired bone measures (vertebral and femoral) and self-reported physical activity in mid-life (mean age, 50 years), in old age (=65 years), and throughout life (recalled during old age) were investigated in 2,110 men and 2,682 women in the AGES-Reykjavik Study. Results conclude lifelong physical activity with continuation into old age (=65 years) best maintains better bone health later in life.
Skeletal loading is thought to modulate the loss of bone in later life, and physical activity is a chief means of affecting bone strength by skeletal loading. Despite much discussion regarding lifelong versus early adulthood physical activity for preventing bone loss later in life, inconsistency still exists regarding how to maintain bone mass later in life (=65 years).
We examined if lifelong physical activity is important for maintaining bone strength in the elderly.
The associations of quantitative computerized tomography-acquired vertebral and femoral bone measures and self-reported physical activity in mid-life (mean age, 50 years), in old age (=65 years), and throughout life (recalled during old age) were investigated in 2,110 men and 2,682 women in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Our findings conclude that lifelong physical activity with continuation into old age (=65 years) best maintains better bone health in the elderly.
PubMed ID
22234811 View in PubMed
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