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45 records – page 1 of 5.

The 1978-79 INCO workers' strike in the Sudbury basin and its impact on alcohol consumption and drinking patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243374
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1982 Mar;3(1):22-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
N. Giesbrecht
G. Markle
S. Macdonald
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1982 Mar;3(1):22-38
Date
Mar-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Behavior
Humans
Income
Mining
Ontario
Stress, Psychological
Strikes, Employee
PubMed ID
7085867 View in PubMed
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Age-related slowing of digit symbol substitution revisited: what do longitudinal age changes reflect?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185522
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2003 May;58(3):P187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Stuart W S MacDonald
David F Hultsch
Esther Strauss
Roger A Dixon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. stuart.macdonald@neurotec.ki.se
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2003 May;58(3):P187-94
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attention
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Paired-Associate Learning
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Psychometrics
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Wechsler Scales - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A previous investigation reported that cross-sectional age differences in Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS) test performance reflect declines in perceptual processing speed. Support for the tenability of the processing speed hypothesis requires examining whether longitudinal age-related change in DSS performance is largely mediated by changes in speed. The present study used data from the Victoria Longitudinal Study to examine patterns and predictors of longitudinal change in DSS for 512 older adults (M(age) = 68.37 years, SD = 7.43). On the basis of multilevel modeling, baseline DSS performance was poorer for older participants and men, with longitudinal declines more pronounced with increasing age and decreasing speed. In contrast to the present cross-sectional findings, statistical control of change trajectories in perceptual speed using the same data did not substantially attenuate age changes. These discrepancies suggest different sources of variance may underlie cross-sectional age differences and longitudinal age changes for DSS.
PubMed ID
12730311 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and injury: a comparison of emergency room populations in two Canadian provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200380
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1999 Nov;25(4):743-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
C J Cherpitel
N. Giesbrecht
S. Macdonald
Author Affiliation
Alcohol Research Group, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, California, USA.
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1999 Nov;25(4):743-59
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Drinking Behavior
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The few comparative emergency room (ER) studies reported have found alcohol's role in injury occurrence to vary and suggest that regional and cultural differences in drinking patterns may account, in part, for this variation. To further this research, a probability sample of 1708 ER patients was interviewed regarding the role of alcohol in the event, usual drinking patterns, and alcohol-related problems and a urine sample was obtained to estimate blood alcohol concentration (BAC). The sample was from ERs in two Canadian provinces with distinctly different cultures: primarily English-speaking Alberta and French-speaking Quebec. While differences in demographic and drinking characteristics between injured and noninjured in both the Alberta and Quebec ERs were similar to those in other ER studies, the injured in the Alberta ER were more likely to be positive for estimated BAC; to have higher BAC levels; to report drinking prior to the event; and, among those reporting drinking, to have consumed a larger number of drinks and to report feeling drunk at the time of injury compared to those in Quebec. These differences may be associated with cultural differences in typical drinking patterns, with higher rates of abstinence reported in the Alberta ER, but also with higher rates of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems, while those in the Quebec ER were more likely to report consuming smaller quantities with greater frequency (typical of wine-drinking cultures). Additional research is needed to explicate further alcohol's role in injury occurrence for planning effective prevention strategies that are both culturally relevant and specific.
PubMed ID
10548446 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of diarrhea due to verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in the Canadian Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6164
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(6):675-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P. Orr
B. Lorencz
R. Brown
R. Kielly
B. Tan
D. Holton
H. Clugstone
L. Lugtig
C. Pim
S. MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(6):675-84
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bacterial Toxins - adverse effects - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cytotoxins - adverse effects - biosynthesis
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification - metabolism
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Feces - microbiology
Female
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Shiga-Like Toxin I
Abstract
In the summer of 1991 a large outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated diarrhea occurred in 6 Inuit communities in the Canadian Northwest Territories. The total population of these communities is 5,292. Of the 521 individuals who developed diarrhea, 152 (29%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7 on stool culture or positive by verotoxin analysis. Median age was 6 years. The attack rate for children
PubMed ID
7747090 View in PubMed
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Are health care workers at risk for infection during an outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236495
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1986 Oct;14(5):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
T J Marrie
J. George
S. Macdonald
D. Haase
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1986 Oct;14(5):209-13
Date
Oct-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Antibodies - analysis
Cross Infection - blood - immunology - transmission
Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
Humans
Legionnaires' Disease - blood - immunology - transmission
Nova Scotia
Personnel, Hospital
Risk
Abstract
We studied data from 500 health care workers to answer the question: Are health care workers at risk for infection during an outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease? These workers were employed at a hospital where eight cases of nosocomial Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 pneumonia occurred over a 4-week period. The source was potable water. Acute-phase blood samples were collected on the day the water supply was decontaminated, convalescent samples were collected 4 to 6 weeks later from 373 subjects, and a single serum sample was obtained from an additional 127 subjects. Antibody titers to L. pneumophila were determined by an indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) technique and by a microagglutination assay with the epidemic strain as the test antigen. Subjects who had an IFA titer of greater than or equal to 1:256 were retested with an anti-human IgM conjugate. None of the 373 health care workers had a fourfold rise in antibody titer. The geometric mean antibody titer of 73.8 for the 500 health care workers was significantly higher than that of 68.1 for 976 blood donors (p less than 0.01). Only 2.4% had recent infection as evidenced by a microagglutination test, despite the fact that 84% were susceptible. We conclude that in the setting of a short-term outbreak of Legionnaires' disease caused by contaminated potable water the risk of infection among health care workers is low: 2.4% or less.
PubMed ID
3641543 View in PubMed
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Association and linkage of atopic dermatitis with chromosome 13q12-14 and 5q31-33 markers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15543
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2000 Nov;115(5):906-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
K. Beyer
R. Nickel
L. Freidhoff
B. Björkstén
S K Huang
K C Barnes
S. MacDonald
J. Forster
F. Zepp
V. Wahn
T H Beaty
D G Marsh
U. Wahn
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Allergy & Immunology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. Kirsten.Beyer@mssm.edu
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2000 Nov;115(5):906-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Dermatitis, Atopic - genetics
Genetic Markers - genetics
Germany
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 10-20% of the population. Linkage of atopy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and total serum IgE levels to several different chromosomal regions have been described extensively, but little is known about the genetic control of atopic dermatitis. We tested for the association and linkage between atopic dermatitis and five chromosomal regions: 5q31-33, 6p21.3, 12q15-24.1, 13q12-31, and 14q11.2/14q32.1-32.3. Marker analysis was performed in two Caucasian populations: (i) 192 unrelated German children with atopic dermatitis and 59 non-atopic children from a German birth cohort study (MAS'90), parental DNA was tested in 77 of 192 children with atopic dermatitis; (ii) 40 Swedish families with at least one family member with atopic dermatitis selected from the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Children. Evidence for linkage and allelic association for atopic dermatitis was observed for markers on chromosome 13q12-14 and 5q31-33.
PubMed ID
11069631 View in PubMed
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Association of lifelong exposure to cognitive reserve-enhancing factors with dementia risk: A community-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283476
Source
PLoS Med. 2017 Mar;14(3):e1002251
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Hui-Xin Wang
Stuart W S MacDonald
Serhiy Dekhtyar
Laura Fratiglioni
Source
PLoS Med. 2017 Mar;14(3):e1002251
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognitive Reserve
Cohort Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Variation in the clinical manifestation of dementia has been associated with differences in cognitive reserve, although less is known about the cumulative effects of exposure to cognitive reserve factors over the life course. We examined the association of cognitive reserve-related factors over the lifespan with the risk of dementia in a community-based cohort of older adults.
Information on early-life education, socioeconomic status, work complexity at age 20, midlife occupation attainment, and late-life leisure activities was collected in a cohort of dementia-free community dwellers aged 75+ y residing in the Kungsholmen district of Stockholm, Sweden, in 1987-1989. The cohort was followed up to 9 y (until 1996) to detect incident dementia cases. To exclude preclinical phases of disease, participants who developed dementia at the first follow-up examination 3 y after the baseline were excluded (n = 602 after exclusions). Structural equation modelling was used to generate latent factors of cognitive reserve from three periods over the life course: early (before 20 y), adulthood (around 30-55 y), and late life (75 y and older). The correlation between early- and adult-life latent factors was strong (? = 0.9), whereas early-late (? = 0.27) and adult-late (? = 0.16) latent factor correlations were weak. One hundred forty-eight participants developed dementia during follow-up, and 454 remained dementia-free. The relative risk (RR) of dementia was estimated using Cox models with life-course cognitive reserve-enhancing factors modelled separately and simultaneously to assess direct and indirect effects. The analysis was repeated among carriers and noncarriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele. A reduced risk of dementia was associated with early- (RR 0.57; 95% CI 0.36-0.90), adult- (RR 0.60; 95% CI 0.42-0.87), and late-life (RR 0.52; 95% CI 0.37-0.73) reserve-enhancing latent factors in separate multivariable Cox models. In a mutually adjusted model, which may have been imprecisely estimated because of strong correlation between early- and adult-life factors, the late-life factor preserved its association (RR 0.65; 95% CI 0.45-0.94), whereas the effect of midlife (RR 0.73; 95% CI 0.50-1.06) and early-life factors (RR 0.76; 95% CI 0.47-1.23) on the risk of dementia was attenuated. The risk declined progressively with cumulative exposure to reserve-enhancing latent factors, and having high scores on cognitive reserve-enhancing composite factors in all three periods over the life course was associated with the lowest risk of dementia (RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.20-0.81). Similar associations were detected among APOE e4 allele carriers and noncarriers. Limitations include measurement error and nonresponse, with both biases likely favouring the null. Strong correlation between early- and adult-life latent factors may have led to a loss in precision when estimating mutually adjusted effects of all periods.
In this study, cumulative exposure to reserve-enhancing factors over the lifespan was associated with reduced risk of dementia in late life, even among individuals with genetic predisposition.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28291786 View in PubMed
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A ban of fortified wine in Northwestern Ontario and its impact on the consumption level and drinking patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244233
Source
Br J Addict. 1981 Sep;76(3):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
N. Giesbrecht
S. Macdonald
Source
Br J Addict. 1981 Sep;76(3):281-8
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Humans
Ontario
Wine
PubMed ID
6944094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological age and 12-year cognitive change in older adults: findings from the Victoria Longitudinal Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181541
Source
Gerontology. 2004 Mar-Apr;50(2):64-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stuart W S MacDonald
Roger A Dixon
Anna-Lisa Cohen
Janine E Hazlitt
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C., Canada. Stuart.MacDonald@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Gerontology. 2004 Mar-Apr;50(2):64-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body Height - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Canada
Cognition Disorders - physiopathology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Hearing - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Systole - physiology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
Although recent cross-sectional findings indicate that markers of biological age (BA) mediate chronological age (CA) differences in cognitive performance, little is known about their influence on actual cognitive changes.
The purpose of this investigation is to examine CA and BA as predictors of 12-year cognitive change in a longitudinal sample of older adults.
Data from the Victoria Longitudinal Study (VLS) were examined for 125 adults between 67 and 95 years of age. Biomarkers, including visual and auditory acuity, grip strength, peak expiratory flow, blood pressure, and body mass index, were submitted to a factor analysis and a composite BA variable was computed based on factor loadings. Intraindividual change across 5 waves of measurement (3-year intervals) was examined as a function of CA and BA for 5 cognitive domains: verbal processing speed, working memory, reasoning, episodic memory, and semantic memory.
The latent structure of biomarkers was consistent with previous investigations of functional age and a common factor view of biological aging. Results of hierarchical linear modeling showed that BA predicted actual cognitive change (decline) independent of CA.
As a predictor of cognitive performance in late life, CA is a proxy for biological and environmental influences. We have shown that biological influences are independent predictors of actual cognitive change in older adults. This supports the view that cognitive decline is not due to aging per se, but rather is likely due to causal factors that operate along the age continuum.
PubMed ID
14963373 View in PubMed
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The characteristics of alcoholics in treatment arrested for Driving While Impaired.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103450
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Jan;85(1):97-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
S. MacDonald
L L Pederson
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Br J Addict. 1990 Jan;85(1):97-105
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - legislation & jurisprudence
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Automobile Driving
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personality Tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Relationships were explored between various characteristics and Driving While Impaired (DWI) arrests, within a sample of 258 hospitalized male alcoholics. Information on four groups of variables were collected using a self-administered questionnaire: socio-demographic characteristics, drinking characteristics, driving characteristics and psychosocial characteristics. Subjects were subdivided into three groups; those with zero DWI arrests, one DWI arrest and multiple DWI arrests. The results of bivariate analyses showed that while Groups 0 and 1 were very similar to each other, those in Group 2 differed significantly from at least one of the other two groups for about one half of the variables studied. A multivariate discriminant analyses demonstrated that there were no important differences between people with 0 and 1 DWI arrests, as people with one arrest were usually classified as having zero arrests.
PubMed ID
2310860 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.