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Body size and hip fracture risk. Swedish Hip Fracture Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197012
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):214-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
B Y Farahmand
K. Michaëlsson
J A Baron
P G Persson
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):214-9
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body constitution
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
The objective of this population-based case-control study was to determine the independent association between height, weight at different ages and adult weight change on hip fracture risk, and the joint effects of these factors. The study base comprised postmenopausal women 50-81 years of age who resided in six counties in Sweden during the period October 1993 to February 1995. The study included 1,327 cases with an incident hip fracture and 3,262 randomly selected controls. We obtained information on body measures and other factors possibly related to hip fracture through mailed questionnaires and telephone interviews. Height and weight change were dominant risk factors. Tall women (> or = 169 cm) had an odds ratio of 3.16 (95% confidence interval = 2.47-4.05) compared with women shorter than 159 cm. Weight gain during adult life was strongly protective: compared with those with moderate weight change (-3 to 3 kg), those with substantial weight gain (> or =12 kg) had a markedly decreased risk of hip fracture (odds ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval = 0.27-0.45), whereas weight loss was associated with an increased risk. Weight change retained important effects among all subjects, even after controlling for current weight and weight at age 18. In contrast, among women who gained weight, the separate effects of current weight and weight at age 18 were small or absent. Among women who lost weight, both current weight and weight at age 18 had effects that remained after controlling for weight change. Adult weight change and height are dominant body size risk factors for hip fracture. Weight loss vs weight changes demarcates different patterns of hip fracture risk.
PubMed ID
11021622 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
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Calcium intake among women aged 40-76 in Sweden. Study Group MRS SWEA. Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for Eating Assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61972
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1996 Oct;50(5):577-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
K. Michaëlsson
R. Bergström
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
A. Wolk
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1996 Oct;50(5):577-8
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
8944868 View in PubMed
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Calcium, phosphate and albumin in serum. A population study with special reference to renal stone formers and the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75298
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1977 Jan;201(1-2):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1977
Author
S. Ljunghall
H. Hedstrand
K. Hellsing
L. Wibell
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1977 Jan;201(1-2):23-30
Date
Jan-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Calcium - blood
Humans
Hypercalcemia - epidemiology
Hyperparathyroidism - blood - epidemiology
Kidney Calculi - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphates - blood
Reference Values
Seasons
Serum Albumin - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Serum valuse for calcium, phosphate and albumin have been determined in a population study of 2322 49-50-year-old men participating in a health examination survey. Calcium and albumin were significantly correlated (r = 0.34) but adjustment for albumin only caused minor effects on the distribution of calcium. No inverse relationship was found between calcium and phosphate. Seasonal variations over the three years of the health survey could not be established for either calcium or phosphate, whereas there was a slight tendency for albumin to decline during summer. The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in this population of men up to the age of 50 was 0.3% and among those with recurrent renal stones 5.3%. All subjects with verified HPT had a history of recurrent renal stones. One man on thiazide treatment had a slight elevation of calcium which returned to normal after cessation of the drug. No other case of hypercalcemia besides those caused by HPT was found. Mean values and frequency distributions for calcium, phosphate and albumin were almost identical in renal stone formers and matched controls. Hence it seems likely that other factors than those which markedly affect serum levels of calcium and phosphate are of major importance in common renal stone formation.
PubMed ID
835367 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and risk of hip fracture in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10247
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2001 Apr 9;161(7):983-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-2001
Author
J A Baron
B Y Farahmand
E. Weiderpass
K. Michaëlsson
A. Alberts
I. Persson
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
7927 Rubin Bldg, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. John.Baron@Dartmouth.edu
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2001 Apr 9;161(7):983-8
Date
Apr-9-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Body mass index
Bone Density
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Postmenopause
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies regarding the impact of cigarette smoking on the risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women have been inconsistent, suggesting different effects in different groups. The effect of alcohol intake on fracture risk is puzzling: moderate alcohol intake appears to increase bone density, and its association with hip fracture is not clear. METHODS: To assess the associations of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with hip fracture risk among postmenopausal women, we conducted an analysis of a population-based case-control study from Sweden. Cases were postmenopausal women, aged 50 to 81 years, who sustained a hip fracture after minor trauma between October 1, 1993, and February 28, 1995; controls were randomly selected from a population-based register during the same period. A mailed questionnaire requesting information on lifestyle habits and medical history was used 3 months after the hip fracture for cases and simultaneously for controls. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed by means of logistic regression. RESULTS: Of those eligible, 1328 cases (82.5%) and 3312 controls (81.6%) responded. Compared with never smokers, current smokers had an increased risk of hip fracture (age-adjusted OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.41-1.95). Duration of smoking-particularly postmenopausal smoking-was more important than the amount smoked. Former smokers had a small increase in risk (age-adjusted OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.97-1.37) that decreased with the duration of cessation. The age-adjusted OR for women consuming alcohol was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.69-0.93). CONCLUSIONS: Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for hip fracture among postmenopausal women; risk decreases after cessation. Alcohol consumption has a weak inverse association with risk.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Jan 14;162(1):101-211784234
PubMed ID
11295961 View in PubMed
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Clinical and experimental advances in sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73815
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1990 Jan;156(1):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
G. Akerström
J. Rastad
S. Ljunghall
H. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1990 Jan;156(1):23-8
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - diagnostic use
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Sweden
Abstract
Primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) has shown prevalence of up to 3% among elderly women in Nordic health screening surveys, and is increasingly diagnosed in patients with diffuse neuromuscular or psychiatric symptoms. Primary HPT, even with mild hypercalcemia, is associated with increased mortality risk, mainly from cardiovascular disease. Despite the efficacy of new methods, reliable histopathologic distinction between adenomatous and hyperplastic parathyroid disease may still be difficult, and indeed circumstantial evidence suggests that adenoma and chief cell hyperplasia are not always distinctly separate pathophysiologic entities. Irrespective of symptoms, the hyperplasia is associated mainly with mild to moderate hypercalcemia, and may thus constitute an early form of HPT. A more liberal attitude to surgery in primary HPT would increasingly extend treatment to less clear-cut cases. The demonstration by monoclonal antiparathyroid antibodies of a specialized calcium receptor mechanism on the surface of parathyroid cells and its reduced expression in pathologic parathyroid tissue seems to explain defective parathyroid cell function and ensuing hypercalcemia in HPT. These antibodies appear to offer new prospects in parathyroid histopathology and research.
PubMed ID
2181796 View in PubMed
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Colles' fracture associated with reduced bone mineral content. Photon densitometry in 74 patients with matched controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222973
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Oct;63(5):552-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
H. Mallmin
S. Ljunghall
T. Naessén
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Oct;63(5):552-4
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Colles' Fracture - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Osteoporosis - complications - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a prospective population-based investigation, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) of the forearm using single-photon absorptiometry at both a distal and a more proximal site in 74 Colles'-fracture patients who were compared with controls matched for age, sex, and years after menopause. For both groups there was a marked inverse relationship between age and bone mass. However, over the entire age range, the probands had 11 percent reduced BMD when compared with the controls. Our findings confirm that patients with fracture of the distal forearm have reduced BMD. They constitute an appropriate group for studies aimed at prevention of fracture in the elderly.
PubMed ID
1441956 View in PubMed
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Diet and hip fracture risk: a case-control study. Study Group of the Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for Eating Assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48369
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug;24(4):771-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
K. Michaëlsson
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
S. Sörensen
A. Wolk
R. Bergström
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug;24(4):771-82
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Iron - administration & dosage
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. The role of diet as a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures is unclear. Earlier studies have yielded conflicting results. METHODS. In two counties in central Sweden we investigated the association between dietary intake and the risk of proximal femoral fractures in a case-control study nested in a cohort. Women born in 1914-1948 were asked to fill out a food frequency questionnaire when invited to attend for mammographic screening between the years 1987 and 1990. More than 65,000 women completed the questionnaire. Those who had participated in the enquiry and subsequently sustained a first hip fracture were defined as cases. For every case, four individually matched controls, by age and county of residence, were selected from the cohort. A second questionnaire concerning confounding factors was mailed to controls and cases. In all, 247 cases and 893 controls could finally be included. Monthly intake of foods and daily intake of nutrients were calculated. RESULTS. When highest quartile of intake was compared to lowest, intakes of iron (adjusted odds ratio [OR] of 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-6.9), magnesium (adjusted OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-6.0) and vitamin C (adjusted OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-3.1) were found to be independent risk factors for hip fracture. High calcium intake did not protect against hip fracture. Smoking, low physical activity in leisure time, low body mass index, earlier fracture of the distal forearm and diabetes were all risk factors while postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy protected against hip fracture. DISCUSSION. This large study indicates new dietary risk factors for hip fracture. The association between high dietary intake of iron, magnesium and vitamin C and risk of hip fracture has not been reported previously. Further clinical and experimental studies are needed to confirm these findings and to investigate their mechanism of action.
PubMed ID
8550275 View in PubMed
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Diet, bone mass, and osteocalcin: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62031
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 1995 Aug;57(2):86-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
K. Michaëlsson
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
A. Wolk
R. Bergström
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 1995 Aug;57(2):86-93
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Calcium, dietary
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Energy intake
Female
Femur
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Osteocalcin - blood
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spine
Abstract
To determine the relationships among nutrients intake, bone mass, and bone turnover in women we have investigated these issues in a population-based, cross-sectional, observational study in one county in central Sweden. A total of 175 women aged 28-74 at entry to the study were included. Dietary assessment was made by both a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and by four 1-week dietary records. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at five sites: total body, L2-L4 region of the lumbar spine, and three regions of the proximal femur. Serum concentrations of osteocalcin (an osteoblast-specific protein reflecting bone turnover) were measured by a radioimmunoassay. Linear regression models, with adjustment for possible confounding factors were used for statistical analyses. A weak positive association was found between dietary calcium intake as calculated from the semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and total body bone mineral density (BMD) among premenopausal women. No association emerged between dietary calcium intake and site-specific bone mass, i.e., lumbar spine and femoral neck, nor was an association found between dietary calcium intake and serum osteocalcin. BMD at some of the measured sites was positively associated with protein and carbohydrates and negatively associated with dietary fat. In no previous studies of diet and bone mass have dietary habits been ascertained so carefully and the results adjusted for possible confounding factors. Neither of the two methods of dietary assessment used in this study revealed any effect of calcium intake on BMD at fracture-relevant sites among these healthy, mostly middle-aged women.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7584880 View in PubMed
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Distal radius fracture is an early sign of general osteoporosis: bone mass measurements in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217079
Source
Osteoporos Int. 1994 Nov;4(6):357-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
H. Mallmin
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 1994 Nov;4(6):357-61
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Case-Control Studies
Colles' Fracture - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the bone mass by bone density measurements in patients with distal radius fracture, a prospective open case-control study was carried out in the county of Uppsala, Sweden, with population-based cases and controls. There were 111 patients with a distal radius fracture who were otherwise healthy and aged 53-76 years, together with 60 healthy controls of similar age, sex and menopausal status. The main outcome measures were bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and hip measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and in the (non-fractured) distal forearm determined by single-photon absorptiometry. It was found that at all measuring sites BMD was significantly lower in cases than in controls. The difference in the distal forearm was around 20% (p
PubMed ID
7696833 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.