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50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257546
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2014
Author
S. Vaccarella
S. Franceschi
G. Engholm
S. Lönnberg
S. Khan
F. Bray
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon cedex 08, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Date
Aug-26-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Nordic countries' data offer a unique possibility to evaluate the long-term benefit of cervical cancer screening in a context of increasing risk of human papillomavirus infection.
Ad hoc-refined age-period-cohort models were applied to the last 50-year incidence data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to project expected cervical cancer cases in a no-screening scenario.
In the absence of screening, projected incidence rates for 2006-2010 in Nordic countries would have been between 3 and 5 times higher than observed rates. Over 60,000 cases or between 41 and 49% of the expected cases of cervical cancer may have been prevented by the introduction of screening in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Our study suggests that screening programmes might have prevented a HPV-driven epidemic of cervical cancer in Nordic countries. According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries.
PubMed ID
24992581 View in PubMed
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Comparison of US inactivated split-virus and Russian live attenuated, cold-adapted trivalent influenza vaccines in Russian schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212816
Source
J Infect Dis. 1996 Feb;173(2):453-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
A S Khan
F. Polezhaev
R. Vasiljeva
V. Drinevsky
J. Buffington
H. Gary
A. Sominina
W. Keitel
H. Regnery
N L Lonskaya
E. Doroshenko
A. Gavrilov
I. Ivakhov
N. Arden
L B Schonberger
R. Couch
A. Kendal
N. Cox
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1996 Feb;173(2):453-6
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Double-Blind Method
Female
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus
Hemagglutinins, Viral - immunology
Humans
Influenza A virus - immunology
Influenza B virus - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Russia
United States
Vaccination
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage
Vaccines, Inactivated - administration & dosage
Viral Envelope Proteins - immunology
Abstract
In a blinded, placebo-controlled study, the reactogenicity, immunogenicity, and clinical efficacy of single doses of US inactivated split-virus and Russian live attenuated, cold-adapted influenza vaccines were compared in 555 schoolchildren in Vologda, Russia. Serial serum samples were collected and school absenteeism was assessed. Systemic reactions were rare, but local reactions (primarily erythema at the injection site) were observed in 27% of the inactivated vaccine group, and coryza (12%) and sore throat (8%) were observed in the attenuated vaccine group. At 4 weeks after vaccination a > or = 4-fold rise in titer of hemagglutination inhibition antibody to A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and B was noted, respectively, among 78%, 88%, and 53% of children who received inactivated vaccine and among 55%, 79%, and 30% of children who received attenuated vaccine. The vaccine efficacy for preventing school absenteeism due to respiratory illness during the period of peak influenza activity was 56% for inactivated vaccine and 47% for attenuated vaccine.
PubMed ID
8568310 View in PubMed
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Effects of moderate caloric restriction on cortical microvascular density and local cerebral blood flow in aged rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61833
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 1999 Mar-Apr;20(2):191-200
Publication Type
Article
Author
C D Lynch
P T Cooney
S A Bennett
P L Thornton
A S Khan
R L Ingram
W E Sonntag
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University, School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1083, USA.
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 1999 Mar-Apr;20(2):191-200
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Autoradiography
Carbon Dioxide - pharmacology
Cerebral Cortex - blood supply - physiology
Cerebrovascular Circulation - drug effects - physiology
Energy Intake - physiology
Gyrus Cinguli - blood supply - physiology
Hippocampus - blood supply - physiology
Male
Microcirculation - drug effects - physiology
Motor Cortex - blood supply - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
The present study was designed to assess the impact of moderate caloric restriction (60% of ad libitum fed animals) on cerebral vascular density and local cerebral blood flow. Vascular density was assessed in male Brown-Norway rats from 7-35 months of age using a cranial window technique. Arteriolar density, arteriole-arteriole anastomoses, and venular density decreased with age and these effects were attenuated by moderate caloric restriction. Analysis of local cerebral blood using [14C]iodoantipyrine indicated that basal blood flow decreased with age in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus of hippocampus; similar trends were evident in cingulate, retrosplenal, and motor cortex. Basal blood flow was increased in all brain regions of moderate caloric restricted old animals (compared to old ad libitum fed animals) and no differences were observed between ad libitum fed young and caloric restricted older animals. In response to a CO2 challenge to maximally dilate vessels, blood flow increased in young and old ad libitum fed animals, but a similar increase was not observed in caloric restricted old animals. We conclude that a decrease in cerebral vasculature is an important contributing factor in the reduction in blood flow with age. Nevertheless, vessels from young and old animals have the capacity to dilate in response to a CO2 challenge and, after CO2, no differences are observed between the two age-groups. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that aged animals fail to adequately regulate local cerebral blood flow in response to physiological stimuli. Moderate caloric restriction increases microvascular density and cerebral blood flow in aged animals but tissues exhibit little or no increase in blood flow in response to CO2 challenge. The cause of this deficient response may indicate that vessels are maximally dilated in aged calorically restricted animals or that they fail to exhibit normal regulatory control.
PubMed ID
10537028 View in PubMed
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Improving the diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumors: utilizing new advances in biomarker and molecular imaging science.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115978
Source
Neuroendocrinology. 2013;98(1):16-30
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2013
Author
Valeria Giandomenico
Irvin M Modlin
Fredrik Pontén
Mats Nilsson
Ulf Landegren
Jonas Bergqvist
Mohid S Khan
Robert P Millar
Bengt Långström
Jürgen Borlak
Barbro Eriksson
Bengt Nielsen
Lars Baltzer
John C Waterton
Håkan Ahlström
Kjell Öberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Neuroendocrinology. 2013;98(1):16-30
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Disease Management
Humans
Molecular Imaging - standards - trends
Neuroendocrine Tumors - diagnosis - metabolism - therapy
Sweden
Tumor Markers, Biological - metabolism
Abstract
Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are malignant solid tumors that arise in hormone-secreting tissue of the diffuse neuroendocrine system or endocrine glands. Although traditionally understood to be a rare disease, the incidence and prevalence of NET have increased greatly in the past 3 decades. However, during this time, progress in diagnosis and outcome of NET has generally been modest. In order to achieve improved outcome in NET, a better understanding of NET biology combined with more reliable serum markers and better techniques to identify tumor localization and small lesions are needed. Although some NET biomarkers exist, sensitive and specific markers that predict tumor growth and behavior are generally lacking. In addition, the integration of new molecular imaging technologies in patient diagnosis and follow-up has the potential to enhance care. To discuss developments and issues required to improve diagnostics and management of NET patients, with specific focus on the latest advances in molecular imaging and biomarker science, 17 global leaders in the fields of NET, molecular imaging and biomarker technology gathered to participate in a 2-day meeting hosted by Prof. Kjell Öberg at the University of Uppsala in Sweden. During this time, findings were presented regarding methods with potential prognostic and treatment applications in NET or other types of cancers. This paper describes the symposium presentations and resulting discussions.
PubMed ID
23446227 View in PubMed
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Laparoscopic management of cryptorchidism in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74890
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Sep;48(3):453-7; discussion 457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
R. Kucheria
A. Sahai
T A Sami
B. Challacombe
H. Godbole
M S Khan
P. Dasgupta
Author Affiliation
Department of Robotics and Laparoscopic Urology, Guy's & St. Thomas Hospitals & GKT School of Medicine, London, UK.
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Sep;48(3):453-7; discussion 457
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cryptorchidism - diagnosis - surgery - ultrasonography
Humans
Laparoscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Little is reported on the management of impalpable testis in adults. We present the impact of laparoscopy in this patient group. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve adult patients have been referred to our centre over the last year, with impalpable testis. Pre-operative assessment was by either ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or both. Quality of life and patient satisfaction were assessed by validated SF8 and client satisfaction (CSQ-8) questionnaires. Patients were also administered a self constructed questionnaire specifically looking at the impact of a laparoscopic service on their condition. RESULTS: The mean age was 29 yrs (range: 19-36). Two patients declined treatment. Of ten patients undergoing transperitoneal laparoscopy, five had intra-abdominal testes treated by laparoscopic orchidectomy (none malignant), two had the vas going into the deep ring and needed inguinal orchidectomy for an impalpable nubbin while in three cases there were blind ending vessels and vas. SF8 scores for physical HRQoL were unchanged but mental scores were significantly improved (p
PubMed ID
15994002 View in PubMed
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Type 2 diabetes in Canada: concentration of risk among most disadvantaged men but inverse social gradient across groups in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142966
Source
Diabet Med. 2010 May;27(5):522-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
K. Dasgupta
S. Khan
N A Ross
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. kaberi.dasgupta@mcgill.ca
Source
Diabet Med. 2010 May;27(5):522-31
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess sex-specific associations of educational and income levels with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Logistic regression analyses (Canadian Community Health Survey, cross-sectional) adjusted for ethnicity, immigration, urban/rural, overweight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, chronic conditions and regular physician.
Compared to women with some post-secondary education, Type 2 diabetes was more likely in both high school graduates without post-secondary education [odds ratio (OR) 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.51] and high school non-completers (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.47-2.04); among men, definitive conclusions in high school graduates without post-secondary education could not be drawn (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.78-1.12), but Type 2 diabetes was more likely in high school non-completers (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.48). Compared to women with the highest income, Type 2 diabetes was three times more likely in the lowest income group (OR 2.90, 95% CI 2.25-3.73), 2.53 times more likely in the low middle income group (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.98-3.24) and 55% more likely in the high middle income group (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.20-2.01). Among men, Type 2 diabetes was approximately 40% more likely in both the lowest (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.10-1.80) and low middle income groups (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.12-1.71); definitive conclusions in the high middle income group could not be drawn (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.87-1.28).
In women, Type 2 diabetes increased monotonically with lower educational and income levels; in men, Type 2 diabetes was concentrated in the least educated and least affluent. Our findings support the need for policies and practices that lower diabetes risk among the most disadvantaged women and men and moderately disadvantaged women.
PubMed ID
20536947 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.