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[A national quality program for otorhinolaryngology. Five diagnoses are described--computerization is an obstacle].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205023
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jun 24;95(26-27):3107-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-1998
Author
I. Engstrand
S. Hellström
S. Engquist
Author Affiliation
Oron-, näs- och halskliniken, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jun 24;95(26-27):3107-8
Date
Jun-24-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases - surgery
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
9679428 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes is common in wild birds in Helsinki region and genotypes are frequently similar with those found along the food chain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160702
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2008 Mar;104(3):883-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
S. Hellström
K. Kiviniemi
T. Autio
H. Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. sanna.hellstrom@helsinki.fi
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2008 Mar;104(3):883-8
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - microbiology
Disease Reservoirs
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Environmental Microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Finland
Food chain
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry
Genotype
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - transmission
Waste management
Abstract
To evaluate the prevalence and genetic diversity of Listeria monocytogenes in wild birds and to compare the genotypes with isolates previously collected from foods and food processing environments.
Samples of wild birds' faeces (n = 212) were collected from a municipal landfill site and from urban areas in the Helsinki region and analysed by two-step enrichment and plating onto L. monocytogenes-selective agar. The overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes in bird faeces was 36% (95% CI 30-43%), and prevalence on the landfill site was significantly higher. All isolates were analysed with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and compared with the L. monocytogenes profiles in an existing collection. Similar pulsotypes were found in birds and in isolates collected along the food chain.
Birds commonly carry L. monocytogenes, and strains are frequently similar with those detected in foods and food processing environments. Thus, birds may disseminate L. monocytogenes in nature and may also contaminate foods when entering the food processing environments and outdoor market places.
Populations of L. monocytogenes in wild birds and along the food processing chain overlap. Our findings add to the epidemiological data on this significant foodborne pathogen.
PubMed ID
17953682 View in PubMed
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A national framework for district nurses' uniform documentation patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210364
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1997;46:401-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
I. Rising
M. Ehnfors
L. Abrahamsson
A. Borgström
B M Forsgren
S. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Informatics in General Practice, Sollentuna, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1997;46:401-3
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forms and Records Control - methods
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Nursing Records
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Vocabulary, Controlled
PubMed ID
10184816 View in PubMed
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[Telemedicine in sparsely populated areas yields satisfied patients and better competence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68900
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Sep 19;98(38):4049-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-2001
Author
L. Carle
C. Made
S. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Näs- och halskliniken, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå. lars.carle.sls@vll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Sep 19;98(38):4049-52
Date
Sep-19-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Community Health Centers - economics - standards
English Abstract
Family Practice - economics - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Remote Consultation - economics - methods - standards
Rural Health Services - economics - standards
Sweden
Telemedicine - economics - methods - standards
Abstract
A telemedical pilot-project involving two rural primary health care centers in Tärnaby/Storuman in Southern Lappland and the University Hospital of Umeå was carried out during the period Sept. 1, 1996-Dec. 31, 1998. Out of 169 consultations in all, 40 pertained to dermatology, 50 to ENT, 40 to orthopedics, and a further 27 to other specialties (surgery, medicine and gynecology). Among the 169, 47 cases were successfully managed via telemedicine. 30% of consultations were made in order to secure a second opinion. The remaining 70% were made in order to seek advice concerning a possible referral. At the telemedical visit, patients indicated a satisfaction score of 5.5 on a scale up to 6.0. The GP's rated the educational value at 4.4. After completion of the pilot-project, a survey of acceptance and ratings of the future potential of telemedicine for the health care system was carried out among 191 doctors and other health care workers in Västerbotten county. Using a similar graded scale up to 6.0, physicians rated telemedicine as regards utility for patients and quality of care at 4.6 and 4.5 respectively, somewhat higher than they rated the consequences of telemedical consulting for their working conditions and health care organizations, at 3.8 and 4.1 respectively. Despite a low volume of patients in the pilot project, we can conclude that telemedical consultations seem to reduce the number of referrals and raise the level of competency of the GP's. It's important to find further fields of application, as well as further ways of working and organizing the communication network in order to increase volume.
PubMed ID
11602963 View in PubMed
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Tele-otolaryngology consultations between two rural primary-care centres in southern Lapland and the University Hospital of Umeå.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68939
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1999;5 Suppl 1:S93-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
C. Made
L. Carle
O. Söderberg
S. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Umeå, Sweden. curt.made.sls@vll.se
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1999;5 Suppl 1:S93-4
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Costs
Hospitals, University
Humans
Patient Education
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - economics - methods
Remote Consultation - economics - methods
Rural Health Services - economics
Sweden
Abstract
In 1996 a telemedicine link was established between two primary-care centres of Västerbotten county and the University Hospital. Specialties involved at the University Hospital were otoloaryngology, orthopaedics and dermatology. Videoconferencing used ISDN at 384 kbit/s. The primary-care centres were equipped with video-endoscopes. During the first 21 months, there were 32 otolaryngology consultation. The average time for each consultation was between 15 and 30 min. Patients, general practitioners and specialists were interviewed using questionnaires with answers on a six-point scale, in which a score of six was best. Patient satisfaction produced a mean score of 5.7. The specialist doctors rated the video-consultation satisfactory for diagnosis. Roughly 40% of the referrals could be avoided by telemedicine. The general practitioners rated the educational effect of the consultation very highly.
PubMed ID
10534859 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.