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[An inquiry among home health aides. "We don't have sufficient knowledge about drugs."]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73068
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 15;92(11):1118-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1995
Author
T. Bylund
C I Ström
S. Elmståhl
Author Affiliation
Kliniken för geriatrik och rehabilitering, Värnhems sjukhus, Malmö.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 15;92(11):1118-22
Date
Mar-15-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Dosage Forms
Drug Administration Routes
Female
Home Health Aides
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
7700116 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometric reference data for elderly Swedes and its disease-related pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273238
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1066-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
N N Gavriilidou
M. Pihlsgård
S. Elmståhl
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1066-75
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry - methods
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Reference Values
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Anthropometric measurement is a noninvasive and cost-efficient method for nutritional assessment. The study aims to present age- and gender-specific anthropometric reference data for Swedish elderly in relation to common medical conditions, and also formulate prediction equations for such anthropometric measurements.
A cross-sectional study among random heterogeneous sample of 3360 subjects, aged 60-99 years, from a population study 'Good Aging in Scania. Means (±s.d.) and percentiles for height, weight, waist-, hip-, arm-, calf circumferences, triceps- (TST) and subscapular skinfold thickness (SST), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were presented. The values were estimated based on the prevalence of myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac failure (CHF), stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia and dependence in daily living activities (ADL). Linear regression analysis was used to formulate the prediction equations.
Mean BMI was 27.5±5.8?kg/m(2) (men) and 27.2±8.1?kg/m(2) (women). WHR was higher among men (Men: 0.98±0.3, women: 0.87±0.2), except at age 85+ (women: 0.91±0.6). TST was 6.7±0.4?mm higher among women. Men with MI had BMI: 28.6±4.8?kg/m(2) and SST: 21±9.2?mm, whereas subjects with dementia had lower weight (by 9.5±2.9?kg) compared with the non-demented. ADL-dependent women had BMI= 29.0±3.9?kg/m(2), TST=19.2±1.3?mm.
New normative data on gender- and age-specific anthropometrics on the general elderly population are presented. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with subcutaneous and central adiposity opposed to fat loss with dementia. ADL dependence indicates inadequate physical activity. The prediction models could be used as possible indicators monitoring physical activity and adiposity among the general elderly population hence potential health indicators in health promotion.
Notes
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Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Jan;100(1):59-6610646006
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 1999;3(3):172-610840472
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Jun;55(6):482-9211423925
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2002 Feb;87(2):177-8611895170
Cites: Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Apr;16(2):158-6815195992
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1975 Nov;198(5):397-4071081814
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1980 Jan;33(1):155-627355777
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1989;21(4):171-72631192
Cites: BMJ. 1990 Apr 7;300(6729):902-32186832
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-2021785028
Cites: Aging (Milano). 1993 Feb;5(1):47-548481425
Cites: Z Gerontol. 1993 May-Jun;26(3):163-98337910
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Dec;60(6):843-87985622
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 1995;854:1-4528594834
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1996 Oct;64(4):650-88839517
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 Jul;50 Suppl 2:S9-158841780
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):449-6016895897
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:217201919
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2006 Dec;77(6):902-1117260199
Cites: Nutrition. 2009 Jan;25(1):33-918834720
Cites: J Aging Health. 2010 Mar;22(2):242-6120133958
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Dec;5(12):2258-6820947789
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2011;20(1):9-1321393104
Cites: J Aging Health. 2013 Feb;25(1):119-3523277332
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):215-2023183497
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 May;49(5):831-924100915
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Nov;68(11):1228-3325117995
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 May;69(5):565-7125205322
PubMed ID
25990690 View in PubMed
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Associations of central and brachial blood pressure with cognitive function: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277249
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2016 Feb;30(2):95-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
E D Nilsson
S. Elmståhl
L. Minthon
P M Nilsson
M. Pihlsgård
K. Nägga
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2016 Feb;30(2):95-9
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Brachial Artery - physiopathology
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous observational studies on the association between brachial blood pressure (BP) and cognition have reported conflicting results. Central BP has been hypothesized to be more strongly related to cognition than brachial BP. The aim of this study was to assess the association between brachial as well as central BP and cognitive function, both cross-sectionally and with brachial BP measured 17 years before cognitive testing. The study population comprised 2548 individuals aged 61-85 years at follow-up (61.4% women). The cognitive tests administered were A Quick Test of cognitive speed and the Mini Mental State Examination. In fully adjusted linear regressions, small but significant cross-sectional associations were found between higher BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and worse results on both of the cognitive tests (P-values
PubMed ID
25880593 View in PubMed
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Bias in diet assessment methods--consequences of collinearity and measurement errors on power and observed relative risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61917
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Oct;26(5):1071-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
S. Elmståhl
B. Gullberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Oct;26(5):1071-9
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diet Surveys
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Assessment
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: If several risk factors for disease are considered in a regression model and these factors are affected by measurement errors, the observed relative risk will be attenuated. In nutritional epidemiology, several nutrient variables show strong correlation, described as collinearity. The observed relative risk will then depend not only on the validity of the chosen diet assessment method but also on collinearity between variables in the model. METHODS: The validity of different diet assessment methods are compared. The correlation coefficients between common nutrients and foods are given using data from the Malm? Food Study. Intake of nutrients and foods were assessed with a modified diet history method, combining a 2-week food record for beverages and lunch/dinner meals and a food frequency questionnaire for other foods. The study population comprised 165 men and women aged 50-65 years. A multivariate logistic regression model is used to illustrate the effect of collinearity on observed relative risk (RRo). RESULTS: A moderate to high correlation between risk factors will substantially influence RRo even when using diet assessment methods with high validity. Methods with low validity might even give inverse RRo. CONCLUSION: It is stressed that caution must be exercised and only a selected number of variables should be included in the model, especially when they are highly intercorrelated, since RRo might be severely biased.
PubMed ID
9363530 View in PubMed
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Body composition and dietary habits in 80-year-old smoking men without cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67858
Source
Aging (Milano). 1991 Sep;3(3):269-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
S. Elmståhl
G. Järnblad
L. Stavenow
P. Jerntorp
H. Pessah-Rasmussen
H. Galvard
P. Nilsson-Ehle
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Värnhem Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Aging (Milano). 1991 Sep;3(3):269-77
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Body Composition
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Eighty-year-old male residents in the community of Malmö were questioned about smoking habits and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Of 1,280 subjects, 122 were selected for further studies and allocated into 4 groups: 1) no CVD, non-smokers; 2) no CVD, smokers; 3) CVD, smokers; and 4) CVD, non-smokers. The smokers had consumed on the average 13 g of tobacco daily for 59 years. Lean body mass (LBM), body fat (BF), % body fat (%BF), and total body water (TBW) were estimated by means of bioelectrical impedance analysis. The mean body weight (BW), LBM, and %BF for all subjects were 74.1 +/- 10.2 kg, 58.0 +/- 6.8 kg, and 21.3 +/- 5.9 kg, respectively. There were no significant differences between all subjects with and without CVD. A lower BW among smokers than in non-smokers was explained by lower BF and %BF in the former. Smokers who had lived predominantly in rural areas had lower BW (6.9 kg) and LBM (5.2 kg) than those from an urban area. A positive correlation was noted between the degree of physical activity and LBM and TBW. Seventeen percent of the smokers exercised regularly. The CVD group had higher plasma cholesterol concentrations than the non-CVD group. Plasma triglycerides showed a positive correlation with BF, %BF and BW, whereas HDL cholesterol was negatively correlated with BF, %BF and BW. It is concluded that smoking is one of several important factors related to body composition, and the penetrance of this factor is still apparent in elderly men.
PubMed ID
1764495 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cerebral perfusion in the elderly with nocturnal blood pressure fall.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162820
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2007 Jul;14(7):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
A. Siennicki-Lantz
F. Reinprecht
J. Axelsson
S. Elmståhl
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Arkadiusz.Siennicki-Lantz@skane.se
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2007 Jul;14(7):715-20
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Brain Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cerebrovascular Circulation - drug effects
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diastole
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hypertriglyceridemia - epidemiology
Male
Prospective Studies
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
Cerebrovascular disease may be linked with vascular autoregulation in aging. The aim of this study was to examine relation between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) fall and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in elderly men. The prospective 'Men born in 1914' cohort study has been in progress since 1968 and included 809 subjects. After 14 years from the last follow up, 97 subjects reached the age of 82 and underwent CBF measurement and 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Diastolic BP at night decreased in 84 subjects with median 12.7% and increased in 13 subjects with median 3.7%. Relative diastolic BP fall at night was negatively associated to CBF in temporal and infero-parietal areas. Higher proportion of subjects with increasing systolic BP during the 14-year period was observed in the subgroup with extreme nocturnal diastolic BP dip, irrespectively of BP values or prevalence of hypertension. Extreme nocturnal diastolic BP fall in a cohort of elderly men is correlated with focal changes in CBF. Further studies could explain if increasing BP in the elderly is a cause or result of pathological autoregulation, and if antihypertensive treatment increases nocturnal BP dip.
PubMed ID
17594325 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of fatty acid profile in plasma phospholipids in women from Granada (southern Spain) and Malmö (southern Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19532
Source
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2001 Jul;71(4):237-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
V. Chajès
S. Elmståhl
C. Martinez-Garcia
A L Van Kappel
F. Bianchini
R. Kaaks
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2001 Jul;71(4):237-42
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Meat
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Phospholipids - blood - chemistry
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seafood
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
We conducted a first pilot study on healthy women living in two countries with different dietary habits, Granada in the south of Spain and Malmö in the south of Sweden, in order to compare their levels of plasma phospholipid fatty acids, and to examine the relationship between the differences in food consumption. This study is part of a pilot study which is nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, a multi-centre prospective cohort study on diet, plasma concentrations of antioxidants and fatty acids, and markers of oxidative stress. Thirty-nine women in Granada and thirty-eight women in Malmö, aged 45-50 years (all pre-menopausal) were selected among the female participants in the cohorts from these two countries. Individual measurements of the women's habitual diet were obtained by a food frequency questionnaire. 24-hour diet recalls were used for the standardised measurement of diet at group level. Plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition was determined by capillary gas chromatography. We found a different fatty acid profile in plasma between the two populations, with higher mean levels of palmitic acid (16:0), palmitoleic acid (16:1) (n-7), oleic acid (18:1), alpha-linolenic acid (18:3) (n-3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) (n-3), and lower mean levels of stearic acid (18:0) in Malmö compared to Granada. Women in Malmö consumed more meat, alcoholic beverages and sugar, and less fish and shellfish than women in Granada. We conclude that the fatty acid composition in plasma phospholipids is different between women from the two European centres. For polyunsaturated fatty acids, differences were observed for (n-3) fatty acids. In relation to these differences, we observed that specific food intakes, particularly meat and fish, varied between the two centres.
PubMed ID
11582859 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns in high and low consumers of meat in a Swedish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21141
Source
Appetite. 1999 Apr;32(2):191-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
S. Elmståhl
O. Holmqvist
B. Gullberg
U. Johansson
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University.
Source
Appetite. 1999 Apr;32(2):191-206
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Meat - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to examine relationships between meat and other food items which have been associated with higher risk of cancer in the colon and prostate in some epidemiological studies. The study was conducted as a population-based cohort study comprising 11648 subjects (4816 male and 6742 female) born between 1926 and 1945 and living in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Data on mean daily intake of foods and nutrients were assessed with a diet history method combining a 7-day menu book and a food frequency questionnaire. Increasing meat intake, expressed in quintiles and adjusted for energy, was associated with decreasing intakes of poultry, fish, fruits, bread, cereals and cheese in both sexes. Low negative correlations between meat intake and ascorbic acid (r= -0.11) and fiber (r= -0.16 to -0.20) were noted. The average intake of fat from meat out of total fat intake was 13.6% in men and 11.9% in women. No major associations were noted between meat and the cholesterol raising fatty acids C:12:0, C:14:0, C:160 nor for C:20:4 or its precursor C:18:2. In conclusion, our findings indicate that meat consumption is negatively associated with food groups rich in antioxidants and fiber and the positive covariance reported between meat and cancer and coronary heart disease might, therefore, not be directly linked to components in meat.
PubMed ID
10097025 View in PubMed
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Eighty-year-old men without cardiovascular disease in the community of Malmö. Part I. Social and medical factors, with special reference to the lipoprotein pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55341
Source
J Intern Med. 1990 Jul;228(1):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
L. Stavenow
S. Elmståhl
P. Jerntorp
P. Nilsson-Ehle
H. Pessah-Rasmussen
H. Galvard
F. Hansen
S M Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1990 Jul;228(1):9-15
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alkaline Phosphatase - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypertension - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - blood
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
A total of 1280 80-year-old men were invited to a medical examination to study common risk indicators for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the elderly. From the pool of 811 responders (63.3%), all 122 individuals who fulfilled our inclusion criteria were assigned to one of four groups: (1) no CVD, non-smokers; (2) no CVD, smokers; (3) CVD, smokers; (4) CVD, non-smokers. A telephone interview with 75 non-responders suggested that this group contained more institutionalized subjects, but otherwise did not differ from the group of participants. Subjects with CVD had higher levels of plasma cholesterol and LDL cholesterol than those without CVD, whereas plasma HDL cholesterol and plasma triglyceride concentrations did not differ between the groups; thus the LDL/HDL ratio was higher in the CVD group. Lipoprotein concentrations did not differ between smokers and non-smokers. However, the mean cholesterol levels were low (5.19 +/- 1.01 mmol l-1), suggesting selective mortality. No differences between the groups were found with regard to Lp(a). The mean blood pressure for the whole group was 149/79 mmHg, and there were no differences between subgroups. Our study suggests that mechanisms such as selective mortality modify the risk factor pattern in the elderly. In 80-year-old individuals, elevated LDL cholesterol levels can still be identified as a risk indicator for CVD, whereas there does not appear to be any association between CVD or low HDL levels or elevated blood pressure in this age group.
PubMed ID
2384740 View in PubMed
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Family caregiving in dementia--an analysis of the caregiver's burden and the "breaking-point" when home care becomes inadequate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52482
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2000 Mar;28(1):23-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
L. Annerstedt
S. Elmståhl
B. Ingvad
S M Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2000 Mar;28(1):23-31
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - nursing
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dementia, Vascular - nursing
Female
Home Nursing
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The burden of caregivers of patients suffering from of Alzheimer type dementia (DAT) and vascular dementia (VD) was analysed at the critical time, the "breaking-point", when home care becomes insufficient and/or inadequate and the caregiver burden has probably reached its upper limit. Primary family caregivers of 39 DAT and 40 VD patients who were being considered for relocation into group-living units were studied. Total caregiving burden and different aspects of the burden: general strain, isolation, disappointment, and emotional involvement, were correlated with the patients' diagnoses, abilities, and symptoms. Closer kinship to the patient imposed a heavier burden. The caregiver's gender, social class, and previous institutionalization of the patient did not influence the caregiver burden. There was no significant correlation between the patients' ADL ability or cognition and the burden. A higher level of disappointment was found among the VD carers. Different symptomatology in patients of the two diagnostic groups was related to special aspects of the burden. Multiple regression analysis showed that the amount of caregiving time each week and impaired sense of own identity, misidentifications, clinical fluctuations, and nocturnal deterioration in the patients predicted the breaking-point.
PubMed ID
10817311 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.