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Cardiovascular burden and related risk factors among Nunavik (Quebec) Inuit: insights from baseline findings in the circumpolar Inuit health in transition cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96676
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Jun;26(6):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marie-Ludivine Chateau-Degat
Eric Dewailly
Rabia Louchini
Emilie Counil
Martin Noël
Annie Ferland
Michel Lucas
Béatriz Valera
Jean-Marie Ekoé
Robert Ladouceur
S. Déry
Grace Egeland
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-ludivine.chateau-degat@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Jun;26(6):190-6
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - etiology
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Transition
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Life Style
Male
Obesity - complications - ethnology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Inuit are commonly portrayed to be somehow protected from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) through their traditional lifestyle and diet. However, actual sociocultural transition and related major, modifiable risk factors have scarcely been quantified in the Inuit population. Such knowledge is extremely valuable in terms of public health intervention.METHODS: A total of 887 Inuit residents from Nunavik, Quebec, participated in a cohort study. The estimates presented were derived from anthropometric and biological measurements gathered at the time of recruitment and enhanced by information collected in the medical file of each participant. All estimates were corrected for a complex sampling strategy and bootstrapped to ensure the representativeness of the general Nunavik population.RESULTS: Overall, 19% of Inuit had a disease of the circulatory system according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision. Among all disorders, peripheral circulatory system disease was the most prevalent (9%). Prevalences of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease were of similar magnitude (2.5%). No significant difference in disease prevalence was noted between sexes. The major modifiable CVD risk factors were smoking (84%), obesity (49%) (body mass index of greater than 30 kgm2) and elevated blood pressure (13085 mmHg or greater) (18%). Prevalences were globally higher among women.CONCLUSION: The current belief that the Inuit are protected from CVD is seriously questioned by the results of the present study. Considering the extremely high prevalence of CVD risk factors, a population-based intervention reinforced for women is urgently needed to reduce their risk.
PubMed ID
20548980 View in PubMed
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Dietary sodium intake deleteriously affects blood pressure in a normotensive population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126993
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Apr;66(4):533-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
M L Chateau-Degat
A. Ferland
S. Déry
E. Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des Populations et Environnementale, Centre de Recherche du CHUL, Québec, QC, Canada. marie-ludivine.chateau-degat@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Apr;66(4):533-5
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Determination
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Inuits
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Western dietary pattern, and particularly high dietary sodium intake (DSI), is recognized for its detrimental impact on blood pressure (BP). This paper examined the association of DSI with BP in Nunavik Inuit (Québec), a population known to have an optimal BP on average. In a population-based study, we recruited 421 normotensive participants aged 18-74 years from 14 coastal villages, situated north of the 55th parallel. BP, biochemistry and anthropometry were obtained. DSI was assessed by a 24-h dietary recall. Mean (s.e.) DSI was higher in men than in women (2358 (101) vs. 1702 (100) mg/d, P
PubMed ID
22333870 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiological study of a tuberculosis case in a large manufacturing enterprise in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201566
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):156-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M J Drolet
R. Boisvert
S. Déry
D. Laliberté
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de la santé, Centre-du-Québec. marie.josee.drolet@msss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):156-9
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Epidemiologic Studies
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis, Laryngeal - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of tuberculosis infection related to a case of pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis in a workplace and to study PPD predictors.
The Mantoux skin test (PPD) was offered to all potentially infected contacts. Participants were asked to answer a questionnaire.
Among 112 exposed employees, 92 (82.1%) were tested. At the 5 mm level, 65.2% of employees had positive tuberculin skin test (PPD). By controlling prior BCG and the degree of exposure, it showed a positive association between age and PPD (RC: 3.5; 95% CI: 1.25-10.03). When age and BCG were controlled, high exposure was statistically associated with PPD results (RC: 5.6; 95% CI: 1.25-24.68).
The observed prevalence rate is probably related to the fact that the index case was very infectious and had contact in an enclosed area over a long period of time before withdrawal from work.
PubMed ID
10401163 View in PubMed
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Is marine mammal fat or fish intake most strongly associated with omega-3 blood levels among the Nunavik Inuit?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96335
Source
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2010 Jul 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-2010
Author
M. Lucas
F. Proust
C. Blanchet
A. Ferland
S. Déry
B. Abdous
E. Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des Populations et Environnement, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval (CHUL-CHUQ), Delta Building #2 - Office 600, 2875 Laurier Blvd., 6th Floor, Que., Canada G1V 2M2.
Source
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2010 Jul 13;
Date
Jul-13-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Here we determined the relationship between red blood cell (RBC) omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) and usual dietary marine food product intake among 630 Nunavik Inuit adults. Marine food product intake was determined by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and fatty acids were quantified in RBC membranes. Multiple linear regression was undertaken to determine the relationship between marine food product inatke and RBC n-3 LC-PUFAs (dependent variable). Mean RBC n-3 LC-PUFA level was 9.16+/-0.11% [SEM]. The highest correlations noted with RBC n-3 LC-PUFAs were for marine mammal fat (r(s)=0.41, P
PubMed ID
20634051 View in PubMed
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Monitoring of umbilical cord blood lead levels and sources assessment among the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4471
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Sep;60(9):693-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
B. Lévesque
J-F Duchesne
C. Gariépy
M. Rhainds
P. Dumas
A M Scheuhammer
J-F Proulx
S. Déry
G. Muckle
F. Dallaire
E. Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique, Centre de recherche du CHUL-CHUQ, 945, avenue Wolfe, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada. Benoit.Levesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Sep;60(9):693-5
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Firearms
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lead - blood
Neonatal Screening
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Analyses completed on samples collected between 1993 and 1996 showed that about 7% of 475 Inuit newborns from northern Quebec (Canada) had a cord blood lead concentration equal to or greater than 0.48 micromol/l, an intervention level adopted by many governmental agencies. A comparison between the cord blood lead isotope ratios of Inuit and southern Quebec newborns showed that lead sources for these populations were different. Our investigation suggests that lead shots used for game hunting were an important source of lead exposure in the Inuit population. A cohort study conducted in three Inuit communities shows a significant decrease of cord blood lead concentrations after a public health intervention to reduce the use of lead shot. Lead shot ammunition can be a major and preventable source of human exposure to lead.
PubMed ID
12937194 View in PubMed
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Pneumonia epidemic caused by a virulent strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 in Nunavik, Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188115
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2002 Aug 15;28(16):129-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2002

Prevalence of clinical risk factors for osteoporosis in women 50 to 69 years; The Bone Health Nunavik (BOHN) Program

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284534
Source
Pages 163-164 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
S. Morin
A. Robitaille
J. Poliquin
S. Dery
B. Young
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University
Nunavik Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Canada
Ungava Tulattavik Health Centre, Kuujjuaq, Canada
Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services, Kuujjuaq, Canada
Source
Pages 163-164 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 3. Chronic Diseases.
Documents
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Seroprevalence of Seven Zoonotic Infections in Nunavik, Quebec (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101280
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Jul 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2011
Author
V. Messier
B. Lévesque
J-F Proulx
L. Rochette
B. Serhir
M. Couillard
B J Ward
M D Libman
E. Dewailly
S. Déry
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique, Axe santé des populations et environnement, CHUQ-CHUL, Québec, QC, Canada Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université Laval, QC, Canada Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Québec, QC, Canada Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services, Kuujjuaq, QC, Canada Laboratoire de santé publique du Québec, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montréal, QC, Canada National Reference Center for Parasitology, McGill University Tropical Diseases Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada Montréal General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Jul 20;
Date
Jul-20-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In Nunavik, common practices and food habits such as consumption of raw meat and untreated water place the Inuit at risk for contracting zoonotic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of seven zoonotic infections among the permanent residents of Nunavik. The study was conducted in the fall 2004 as part of the Nunavik Health Survey. Blood samples from adults aged 18-74 years (n = 917) were collected and analysed for the presence of antibodies against Trichinella spp., Toxocara canis, Echinococcus granulosus, Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Leptospira spp. and Francisella tularensis. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, traditional activities, drinking water supply and nutrition was gathered using english/inuktitut bilingual questionnaires. The chi-squared test was used to evaluate associations between seropositivity and other measured variables. Statistically significant variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression model to control for confounding factors. Estimated seroprevalences were 8.3% for E. granulosus, 3.9% for T. canis, 5.9% for Leptospira spp. and 18.9% for F. tularensis. Seroprevalence was =1% for Trichinella spiralis, Brucella spp. and C. burnetii. For most infections, seropositivity tended to increase with age. In multivariate analyses, seroprevalence was positively (i.e. directly) associated with age and residence in the Ungava coast area for F. tularensis; age and residence in the Hudson coast area for T. canis; female gender, lower level of schooling and frequent cleaning of water reservoirs for E. granulosus. No risk factor for Leptospira spp. infection was identified. No associations were detected with regards to food habits or environmental exposures. A small but significant portion of the Nunavik population has serologic evidence of exposure to at least one of the pathogenic microorganisms investigated. Further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms for transmission of zoonotic infections and their potential reservoirs in Nunavik.
PubMed ID
21824376 View in PubMed
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The value of mass screening for chlamydia control in high prevalence communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4499
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Apr;78 Suppl 1:i64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
S. Hodgins
R W Peeling
S. Dery
F. Bernier
A. LaBrecque
J F Proulx
J. Joly
M. Alary
D. Mabey
Author Affiliation
Nunavik Board of Health, Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Canada. peelingr@who.int
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Apr;78 Suppl 1:i64-8
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Chlamydia trachomatis
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health promotion
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Public Health Practice
Quebec - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
The social context and epidemiology of STIs in remote communities in Northern Canada was examined. These communities have a persistently high reported incidence of gonorrhoea and chlamydial infection. They remain in the hyperendemic phase of the N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis epidemics. They are ethnically and culturally homogeneous and contain no readily identifiable core groups, making it impossible to distinguish between spread and maintenance networks. Mass screening of the adult population can reduce the reservoir of C. trachomatis infection under these circumstances. It is particularly important to target men in settings such as this where women are routinely screened in antenatal and family planning clinics.
PubMed ID
12083449 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.