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Reading literary theory, reading Ivan Ilych: old wine in new wineskins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219533
Source
Caduceus. 1994;10(3):161-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

To each according to need: a community-based approach to allocating health care resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220356
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Sep 1;149(5):607-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1993
Author
S. Birch
S. Chambers
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Sep 1;149(5):607-12
Date
Sep-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - economics
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - supply & distribution
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Ontario
Abstract
To develop a method of allocating publicly funded health care resources among communities according to their relative levels of need for health care independent of their current patterns of use.
For each health care program population mean levels of resource allocation were calculated and were adjusted for age and sex to produce a national age- and sex-adjusted share of program resources. Indices of relative need for health care (for most programs the standardized mortality ratio) were derived from existing data on aspects of illness and death and were then used to weight the age- and sex-adjusted shares for between-community differences in health risks and health care needs.
The populations of the 49 counties in Ontario were used as the communities among which resources were allocated. Health care expenditures in 1988-89 by the Ontario Ministry of Health were used as the "budget."
Age- and sex-adjusted resource allocations weighted for between-community differences in health care needs differed from allocations based on population size, in certain cases by up to 100%.
Existing data can be used to propose allocations of health care resources that relate to relative levels of need for care across communities.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(4):489-5001948163
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):112-78334602
Cites: Science. 1988 Jul 29;241(4865):540-53399889
Cites: Community Med. 1979 Nov;1(4):275-81527310
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Feb;109(2):186-204425958
PubMed ID
8364817 View in PubMed
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