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[Ambulance personnel should take pictures at the site of accidents!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193891
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jun 27;98(26-27):3162-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-27-2001
Author
J. Andréasson
A. Jonsson
B O Suserud
S. Aström
Author Affiliation
Högskolan i Borås, institutionen Vårdhögskolan.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jun 27;98(26-27):3162-3
Date
Jun-27-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Ambulances - manpower
Documentation
Emergency Medical Technicians
Humans
Photography
Sweden
PubMed ID
11478216 View in PubMed
Less detail

Conflicting attitudes toward euthanasia for severely demented patients of health care professionals in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73970
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1988 May;36(5):397-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
H M Waxman
S. Astrom
A. Norberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Geropsychiatry, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1988 May;36(5):397-401
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dementia - therapy
Euthanasia - psychology
Euthanasia, Active
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Institutionalization
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurses' Aides - psychology
Nursing Staff - psychology
Nursing, Practical
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Resource Allocation
Sweden
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
This survey study of 1,798 Swedish health care workers in 31 acute and chronic institutional settings found considerable disagreement between staff concerning euthanasia. For example, attitudes of aides and LPNs, were significantly (chi 2 = 42.0, P less than .0001) more favorable toward active euthanasia (38.9% of aides and 28.8% of LPNs were neutral or approved) than were RNs and physicians (20% and 14.9%). This disagreement was most apparent among those staff in institutions with many demented patients. Favorable attitudes were also more frequent among aides experiencing job dissatisfaction and "burnout," younger staff, and those without a relative in long-term care. Possible reasons for favorable attitudes toward active euthanasia and staff attitude polarization are discussed along with implications for patient care.
PubMed ID
3361041 View in PubMed
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[Decisions and attitudes of nurses caring for severely ill elderly patients: a culture-comparing study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200145
Source
Pflege. 1999 Aug;12(4):244-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
J. Richter
M R Eisemann
B. Bauer
H. Kreibeck
S. Aström
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Universität Rostock. joerg.richter@med.uni-rostock.de
Source
Pflege. 1999 Aug;12(4):244-9
Date
Aug-1999
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Critical Care
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Germany
Humans
Sweden
Transcultural Nursing
Abstract
Results of a comparative investigation in Swedish and German nurses are presented. Based on a case-vignette with three levels of available information about patient wishes the subjects were asked about their decisions. Generally, the Swedish nurses showed a tendency towards less aggressive treatment-options and to perform less frequent cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) against the patient written will compared with the Germans. The compliance with patient wishes among nurses from both countries was related with the valuation of the patient directive as a useful tool in their decision-making process. Furthermore, the "level of dementia" emerged as a significant predictor of the treatment decision in both groups. The results point to the necessity of continuous education and training of nurses aiming at the issues of ethical attitudes and coping with ethically problematic situations in the treatment of the elderly in order to improve patient autonomy.
PubMed ID
10578912 View in PubMed
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Empathy, experience of burnout and attitudes towards demented patients among nursing staff in geriatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73719
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1990 Nov;15(11):1236-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
S. Aström
M. Nilsson
A. Norberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1990 Nov;15(11):1236-44
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Dementia - nursing
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Geriatric Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes - manpower
Nursing Staff - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A non-anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all nursing staff (n = 557) including RNs, LPNs (psychiatric), LPNs (somatic) and nurses' aides, in one nursing home, one somatic long-term care clinic and one psychogeriatric clinic. Scales measuring empathy, burnout experience and attitudes towards demented patients were included in the questionnaire. The aim of the study was to compare levels of empathy, burnout experience and attitudes among different categories of nursing staff and to examine connections between empathy, burnout and attitudes. The nursing staff showed an overall figure of moderately well-developed empathy and the RNs showed the highest empathy. The RNs had a significantly lower degree of burnout compared to the nurses' aides and the LPNs. Of all respondents, 27.4% were assessed at risk from burnout. Overall, the staff showed a moderately positive attitude towards demented patients and the RNs were most positive. No linear correlation was found between empathy, burnout experience and attitudes. However, a weak negative correlation between burnout and empathy is in accordance with other authors who are suggesting that burnout experience leads to lower empathy in the nursing staff. The fact that the RNs showed the most positive attitudes towards demented patients and had the highest level of empathy compared to LPNs and nurses' aides could be related to lower degree of burnout assessed in the RNs. Qualitative and quantitative overload among the LPNs and nurses' aides connected to the growing number of demented patients in the institutions examined are discussed.
PubMed ID
2269745 View in PubMed
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Health care students' attitudes towards, and intention to work with, patients suffering from senile dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74097
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1986 Nov;11(6):651-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
S. Aström
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1986 Nov;11(6):651-9
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Career Choice
Dementia
Euthanasia
Female
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Health care students' attitudes towards and intention to care for patients suffering from senile dementia were measured by questionnaire during the last week of their education. The relationship between curriculum content and attitudes and other variables which affect student training is discussed. It was noted that education on dementia lagged behind the needs of students. Factorial analysis of the respondents' answers on the attitudinal items indicates generally negative attitudes to demented patients. Few female, and none of the male, students stated an intention to work with demented patients. Fear of death and experiences of patients dying are described, and are seen as crucial factors in the care of demented patients.
PubMed ID
3641854 View in PubMed
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[Personnel for the care of senile dementia--education, knowledge, work and attitude to care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242818
Source
Lakartidningen. 1982 Oct 13;79(41):3661-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-1982

[The Society of Women Physicians: surprising comments in the editorial on the proposed changes of the equal opportunities legislation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196607
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Oct 18;97(42):4764
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-2000

Wish to transfer to other jobs among long-term care workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225822
Source
Aging (Milano). 1991 Sep;3(3):247-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
S. Aström
H M Waxman
M. Nilsson
A. Norberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Aging (Milano). 1991 Sep;3(3):247-56
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Dementia - therapy
Geriatrics - manpower
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Long-Term Care - manpower - psychology
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study is based on questionnaires that were sent to the homes of health care personnel working in geriatric care (N = 583) and acute care (N = 328). The purpose was to investigate differences between these groups of personnel regarding job assignment, intention to transfer to another job, attitudes towards demented patients, and the experience of burnout. The results showed that more persons working in acute care were self-assigned to their jobs than those working in geriatric care. More persons in geriatric care stated a wish to transfer to another job in the health care field than those in acute care. The personnel who constantly work with demented patients showed the most positive attitudes towards this group of patients. A larger proportion of personnel with high burnout scores wanted to transfer to another job, compared to those with low burnout scores.
PubMed ID
1764492 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.