Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

A 6-year longitudinal study of caries in teenagers and the effect of "dropouts" on the findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139575
Source
Community Dent Health. 2010 Sep;27(3):172-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
I B Arnadóttir
W P Holbrook
H. Agústsdóttir
S R Saemundsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, University of Iceland Reykjavík, Iceland. iarnad@hi.is
Source
Community Dent Health. 2010 Sep;27(3):172-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - radiography
Fisheries
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Patient Dropouts - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Subjects - psychology
Risk-Taking
Rural Population
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate attrition of subjects in a longitudinal study of caries.
A radiographic study of caries and caries-associated factors was carried out in subjects, initially aged 14 years, and followed-up for six years. Attrition of subjects occurred at the last stage of the study.
A nationwide survey of subjects living in fishing, rural farming, and urban communities in Iceland.
A sub-sample of the nationwide random sample comprising 150 subjects was investigated using bitewing radiographs and a structured questionnaire to determine caries-risk factors. Subjects were re-examined at 16 years and 20 years using the same methods.
Mean caries increment from 14-16 years was 3.0 lesions (1.5 lesions/subject/year) but reduced to 2.6 lesions (0.7 lesions/subject/ year) by 20y. The proportion of subjects found to be caries-free at 14 years, 16 years and 20 years, was 29%, 17% and 10%, respectively. "Dropouts" from this study occurred mostly after 16 years. Analysis of subjects dropping out showed that they were least likely to be from the rural farming community but most likely from the fishing community. Those dropping out attended their dentist less frequently, had a higher consumption of carbonated drinks and a higher prevalence and incidence of caries by 16 years.
Subjects with high-risk behaviours, or residents in a fishing community were more likely to drop out of the study. Recognised advantages of conducting longitudinal studies of caries may, therefore, be lost.
PubMed ID
21046910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approximal caries and sugar consumption in Icelandic teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61892
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Apr;26(2):115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
I B Arnadóttir
R G Rozier
S R Saemundsson
H. Sigurjóns
W P Holbrook
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland Faculty of Odontology, Reykjavik.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Apr;26(2):115-21
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Analysis of Variance
Candy - adverse effects - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Energy intake
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Saliva - microbiology
Abstract
The aim of this study, conducted in 1994, was to examine the association between approximal caries and sugar consumption in teenagers residing in three fluoride-deficient areas in Iceland while controlling for a number of behavioral, residential and microbiological factors. One hundred and fifty subjects (mean age 14 years) selected from the Icelandic Nutritional Survey (INS) were examined radiographically and they completed questionnaires about sugar consumption frequency. Total grams of sugar intake were obtained from the INS for each subject. Caries experience on approximal surfaces, diagnosed from radiographs, was used as the dependent variable in the analyses. Altogether 45.2% of subjects were caries free on approximal surfaces. The overall sample was found to have a mean DFS on approximal surfaces of 2.73 (s=4.36) per subject. Average daily total sugar intake was 170 g per subject and the mean number of sugar-eating occasions between meals was 5.32 (s=6.29) per subject. The regression model indicated that the frequency of between-meal sugar consumption was associated with approximal caries, with frequency of candy consumption being the most important of the sugar variables. In multivariate analysis, no relationship was found between dental caries and total daily intake of sugar, although a significant relationship between total sugar consumption and presence of caries was seen in bivariate analysis. Between-meal consumption of sugar remains a risk factor for the occurrence of dental caries, especially in populations with moderate-to-high levels of dental caries experience.
PubMed ID
9645405 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental caries and Streptococcus mutans in a rural child population in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36587
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1992 Oct;100(5):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
S R Saemundsson
H. Bergmann
M O Magnúsdóttir
W P Holbrook
Author Affiliation
Dental Surgery, Vopnafjördur, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1992 Oct;100(5):299-303
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlorhexidine - therapeutic use
Colony Count, Microbial
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Pilot Projects
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Abstract
In spite of having a high socioeconomic standing, in Iceland caries prevalence has remained stubbornly high. This study reports findings from a mixed fishing and farming community in East Iceland that has traditionally been associated with the highest prevalence of caries. A total of 188 children aged 3-16 yr (96.4% of residents of that age group) were examined. At 6 yr the mean dmfs score was 4.1, DMFS 0 and 48% were caries-free. The mean DMFS score at 12 yr was 4.7 and 22.6% remained caries-free but at 16 yr the DMFS score was 11.6 and no children were caries-free. Caries was unevenly distributed within each age group and was more prevalent among residents of the fishing town than the surrounding farming district. In a pilot study conducted in 1989 mean counts of Streptococcus mutans for children aged 4-7 yr were 2.6 x 10(5) cfu/ml and declined to 4.6 x 10(4) cfu/ml in 1990 after a program of chlorhexidine brushing had been added to the routine caries preventive measures adopted in this community. It may therefore be possible to screen Icelandic children for caries risk and apply preventive measures to those demonstrated to be most in need.
PubMed ID
1411275 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Prevalence of dental caries in children in Vopnafjördur]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37901
Source
Tannlaeknabladid. 1990;8(1):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S R Saemundsson
H. Bergmann
Source
Tannlaeknabladid. 1990;8(1):16-20
Date
1990
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Insurance, Dental
Male
Prevalence
Risk factors
State Dentistry
Abstract
The prevalence of dental caries in Iceland has been high for many years and the improvements reported from the other Nordic countries in recent years has been slow to appear in Iceland. In this study the prevalence of dental caries among young children in Vopnafjörour, a small community in East Iceland, was investigated in the spring of 1989. Virtually all children in the community born between 1982 and 1985 were examined clinically and with bite-wing radiographs and caries scored as dmfs and DMFS according to standard criteria. The results indicated that children in this community did not have poor dental health, no worse than children from other parts of the country. Sixty-five per cent of four year old children were caries-free which is similar to the proportion reported from other Nordic countries. Children living in the country districts surrounding the town had significantly better dental health than those living in the fishing town itself. It was also apparent that four year old children attended the dentist less regularly than those aged 6 years and this was attributed to the failure of the State Health Insurance Scheme to reimburse the full cost of treatment for children younger than 6 years. Caries was unevenly distributed among the children with 78% of the total amount of caries being found in 21% of children. Clearly the best way to reduce further the prevalence of dental caries would be to concentrate effort on those children most at risk.
PubMed ID
2135686 View in PubMed
Less detail